backtop


Print 103 comment(s) - last by StanO360.. on Apr 22 at 12:08 PM


  (Source: Paul Stamatiou)
America's second largest automaker is targeting smaller vehicles, gunning hard for baby boomers and Gen Y buyers

At a press event on Friday, Ford Motor Comp. (F) unveiled its new advertising plan to target 160 million Americans that fall into either the "millennial" (aka "Generation Y"; born in the early 1980s to early 2000s) or "baby-boomer" (born between 1946-1964) generations.

I. Ford Guns for Gen. Y, Plugs Zipcar Partnership

Ford's new campaign will focus on the so-called "super segment" which includes small cars, midsize sedans, and small utility vehicles.  The segment accounted for only 35 percent of Ford sales in 2004, but as customers have moved towards smaller vehicles Ford today sees it account for 50 percent of sales.

The automaker has excelled in recent years, behind only General Motors Comp. (GM) in U.S. sales.  In fact, all of the U.S. automakers have done well -- Chrysler LLC is in third place, while Toyota Motor Comp. (TYO:7203) and Honda Motors Comp., Ltd. (TYO:7267) have fallen behind in U.S. sales.  Strong growth in the super segment has saved Ford, sustaining its U.S. growth, while sales have slumped in Europe.  "Super segment" models include the (re-introduced) Fiesta, Focus, Fusion, and Escape.

The automaker acknowledges that the large millennial generation represents a risk, with more of them living with their parents or having lower incomes, but says it's confident it can appeal to them as they settle down and have children.

Ford's Group Marketing Manager Amy Marentic remarks, "Millennial want a vehicle that looks great, but at the same time are sensitive to things like value, fuel efficiency, technology.  [They're] not going to be brand loyal to what their parent did.... When they drive up to the club they want to look fabulous... Just like their cell phone, just like their shoes... they want their car to make a statement about them."

The company views its partnership with Zipcar Inc. (ZIP) as a crucial piece of effective advertising to Generation Y buyers.  Ford Sales Analyst Eric Merkle says that when Gen. Y buyers graduate from colleges they're used to driving Ford via Zipcars, which mostly are Ford Focuses, with a few Escapes mixed in.  

ZipCar
Zipcar is a key partnership for Ford's Gen. Y appeal. [Image Source: Kelvin Ma/Bloomberg]

He says that some will move to cities -- where more Ford Zipcars await -- while others will opt to move to the suburbs and buy a vehicle for commuting.  He says those buyers are more likely to buy a Ford.

In total, Zipcar's Ford fleet logged 2.2 million driver hours last year, with about 700,000 drivers.

II. Manuals Seeing Strong Sales Among Younger Drivers at Ford

In an interview Eric Merkle was asked about how Ford would react to manual drivership decreasing in younger buyers.  Mr. Merkle disputed that premise stating, "Oh no, [Millennials] do really like to drive manuals.  I really think that you're starting to see the manual starting to come back."

He supports his claim with sales figures.  He says approximately 12 to 23 percent of Ford Fiestas sold per month (as many as 1 out of every 5 sold) and 9 to 17 percent of Focuses sold per month come with manuals.  

Manual Transmission
Around one in five Focus and Fiesta buyers pick manuals some months.
[Image Source: Automobile Magazine]

While he did not cite a breakdown by generation, the Focus and Fiesta are cars that are thought to do quite well with Gen. Y buyers, so his claim may well be accurate.

Ford views its chief competitors in the super segment -- particular in the manual sales -- as Mitsubishi Corp. (TYO:8058), Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd. (TYO:7270) subsidiary Subaru, and Volkswagen AG (ETR:VOW).

III. Ford Blasts Back at Critics of MyFord Touch

Mr. Merkle also commented, "[With Sync/MyFord Touch] we didn't want the vehicle to become the cell phone; we wanted to integrate seamless with the cell phone."

I asked Ms. Marentic about Ford's struggles with harsh criticism from J.D Power and Associates and Consumer Reports regarding its graphically overhauled MyFord Touch infotainment system.

MyFord Touch
MyFord Touch in the F-Series. [Image Source: Jason Mick/DailyTech]

She defended Ford's strategy, acknowledging that much like the smartphone, the system started with some bugs, but has gained from continual patches/improvements.  She also asserted that Ford's customer satisfaction surveys consistently rank vehicles sold with MyFord Touch above those not sold with it.

I asked her why the disconnect then, by Consumer Reports, when they are supposed to predict how consumers will react to a vehicle in terms of satisfaction.  She responded, "That's true.  That sounds like a good question for Consumer Reports."

Responding to my inquiry about whether the criticism would soften amid competitors like GM introducing similar technologies in their vehicles, she predicted it likely would, commenting, "As the first mover you get a lot of love, and you get a lot of criticism.  But everybody's going there [to infotainment].  It is the future."

IV. CAFE Quandaries and Looking Ahead to the 2014 Fiesta Mix

I asked Ms. Marentic if she worried about the demand for smaller vehicles to backfire if it flips in coming decades, as automakers may have grown more complacent with regards to tough CAFE increases, such as President Obama's 54.5 mpg 2025 target.  She said she didn't think so, arguing that Ford is always an industry leader in fuel efficiency.

The advertising campaign will kick off not long before the new 2014 Fiesta ST -- a performance-geared variant of the popular front wheel drive (FWD) subcompact  -- hits dealerships the new Fiesta ST "hot hatch" hatchback will be driven by a 1.6L EcoBoost four-cylinder engine, with 197 hp and 214 lb-ft of torque, feeding into a six-speed manual transmission with overall steering ratio of 13.6:1 and increased roll stiffness at the rear axle.  The hatchback is currently the sales leader in Europe in its segment.  

2014 Ford Fiesta
2014 Ford Fiesta ST

Ford will also introduce a new fuel efficient 1.0L inline 3-cylinder EcoBoost Fiesta later in the fall. The engine block of the I3 is light enough to carry onto an airplane (around 50-60 lb, according to estimates).  

Ford Fiesta
Ford Fiesta's 1.0L engine block takes a trip through airport security as a carry-on.
[Image Source: Ford via AutoBlog]

The petite engine is expected to produce around 123 hp and 148 lb-ft of torque.  It bumps the highway fuel economy to 40 mpg.  The new 2014 Fiesta models pack an improved MyFord Touch screen.

Ford's hybrids (Fusion, C-Max) have been seeing strong sales, although its Focus Electric battery electric vehicle has seen tepid sales, forcing deep discounting.

[A special thanks to web-designer and photographer Paul Stamatiou for the shifter shot.  

Sources: Ford [1], [2]



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: March of progress
By inighthawki on 3/24/2013 12:58:10 AM , Rating: 1
I never said I did, nor do I have a problem admitting that, but everyone is missing my point.

They are reading my post and immediately assuming that my point is that manual is harder to drive and is a distraction. I am trying to state that once the initial (very small) learning curve of driving a manual transmission vehicle becomes second nature to the operator, the distinction between driving a manual versus driving an automatic no longer exists. The type of transmission plays no role in how well a person pays attention to their surroundings. There are plenty of people who drive automatic that are just as engaged as the people who drive a manual.

Whether or not a person who drives a manual vehicle is more inclined to be more engaged in the driving experience is completely beside the point I'm trying to make. I have no doubt that driving a manual transmission vehicle will provide the driver with more experience with how the vehicle operates, but having a greater knowledge of how the vehicle works does not guarantee a better driver.


RE: March of progress
By Manch on 3/27/2013 11:09:17 AM , Rating: 2
First you say manuals are a distraction:
quote:
I disagree in cases where the driver is not simply distracted by something else. Having a manual transmissions takes focus OFF traffic and on to actually performing a task at the same time. With an automatic it allows the ability to focus more on what is happening around you than worrying about when you need to shift.


Then it's when you're a "newb"
quote:
Those that are "newbs" at manual transmission are certainly going to be distracted the first number of times driving because it requires them to be far more engaged on how to operate the vehicle than to pay attention to what's happening around them.


Then you say it doesnt once your used to it and added the unskilled caveat:
quote:
What i mean is if the entire experience becomes completely transparent, then it's no different from driving with an automatic transmission. You either let the car do it for you, or you just do it enough that it's reflex. The net result is you have just as much attention to pay to the road as you do driving an automatic. I see no gain there. (And I'm not referring to the technical benefits of the transmission itself)

quote:
I was simply stating that to an unskilled driver, it does require thought and thus not all of their attention is always put on the road, whereas with an automatic this is never the problem, because you can devote your entire attention to what is around you. Once you learn to drive a manual transmission well enough, there is no longer a gap between the two, but manual at that point provides no extra benefit as other posters have tried to claim.


then a littlebit more lane changing with your point and my favorite part in the bold...
quote:
They are reading my post and immediately assuming that my point is that manual is harder to drive and is a distraction. I am trying to state that once the initial (very small) learning curve of driving a manual transmission vehicle becomes second nature to the operator, the distinction between driving a manual versus driving an automatic no longer exists.

No one assumed anything! You said in your first post: Having a manual transmissions takes focus OFF traffic and on to actually performing a task at the same time.

then this bit of flip flop...so now it's not distracted it's engaged
quote:
Whether or not a person who drives a manual vehicle is more inclined to be more engaged in the driving experience is completely beside the point I'm trying to make.


Now, if you don't drive a manual, then how can you even sit here and argue any point?
At this point do YOU know what your point is?


"Mac OS X is like living in a farmhouse in the country with no locks, and Windows is living in a house with bars on the windows in the bad part of town." -- Charlie Miller














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki