backtop


Print 47 comment(s) - last by Philippine Man.. on Apr 1 at 6:52 PM

The company is also adding new Tesla Stores and Superchargers around the U.S.

Tesla Motors is greeting the new spring season with plenty of Model S-related news, including its achievement of more than 500 deliveries per week

"Over the past few months it’s been fun to watch the company achieve new milestones," said George Blankenship, VP of Worldwide Sales and Ownership Experience at Tesla. "First it was the factory ramping up to full production in December. During the past three weeks we have averaged more than 500 Model S deliveries per week, and it looks like we’ll be setting another record this week.

"With all these new cars on the road, it’s fun to watch as Model S racks up the miles. Model S drivers have traveled more than 12 million miles since deliveries first began. That’s a lot of CO2 emissions saved! And how are things going in California? Well, today we registered our 3,000th Model S in the Golden State. That pretty much says it all!"


 
Blankenship's post on Tesla's blog also mentioned a few other tidbits, such as the opening of new Tesla Stores in the Los Angeles area and Miami (as well as more service centers across North America and Europe throughout 2013); the addition of more Superchargers around the U.S. in places like the Pacific Northwest, Illinois, Texas, Florida, the Northeast and California, and the fact that the Model S is now officially a World Car.

Tesla has had some rough patches lately, such as issues with a journalist from The New York Times, who took a test drive this winter and reported a horrific venture. More specifically, he said that the Model S didn't have the range Tesla said it did, and ended up on a flatbed truck at the end of the trip. Musk and the NYT journalist (John Broder) ended up feuding over the matter.

But Tesla and its CEO Elon Musk is turning that luck around with predictions of being profitable in the first quarter and by vowing to pay off its $465 million government loan within five years. 

However, one recent hiccup is a delay to production of the Model X
Tesla had hoped to begin production of the vehicle this year, but those plans have been put off until late 2014 (meaning deliveries will likely be pushed to 2015). 

Source: Tesla Motors



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Now do it for cheaper
By toyotabedzrock on 3/22/2013 4:30:20 PM , Rating: 2
If all the little nice features like the door handles and massive touch screen and leather and nice stereo get stripped could he get the price down to 40-50k.




RE: Now do it for cheaper
By lennylim on 3/22/2013 6:21:41 PM , Rating: 2
The problem with that approach is that many people will balk at paying, say, $45k for an electric car with no bells and whistle. Make it a luxury car, on the other hand, and you're no longer talking about value for money.


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By Reclaimer77 on 3/22/13, Rating: 0
RE: Now do it for cheaper
By captainBOB on 3/22/2013 8:36:48 PM , Rating: 5
Tesla's strategy is to first cater to the high income because they are far more willing to pay for new tech than average joe would.

Tesla does have plans to release a car for the masses later on. Right now going straight into low margin car sales would kill them.

Also the LEAF is doing terribly, far from kicking the Model S in the rear, considering the leaf has a range of ~76 miles to the Model S's 250+ miles.


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By Reclaimer77 on 3/22/13, Rating: 0
RE: Now do it for cheaper
By 1prophet on 3/23/2013 8:19:15 AM , Rating: 2
Yet the same type of mentality of "I don't want to pay for it" somehow rationalizes the subsidies of other industries like oil, agriculture, big bankers etc.,

while calling Americans overpaid and using cheap Chinese goods to eliminate their jobs, from a country that subsidizes its industry openly.


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By Reclaimer77 on 3/23/13, Rating: 0
RE: Now do it for cheaper
By captainBOB on 3/24/2013 11:41:17 PM , Rating: 1
Even in sales as well, its being outsold by the Chevy Volt and Prius plug-in.

http://wot.motortrend.com/dethroned-chevrolet-volt...

They may be selling more units per year than Tesla, but the margins are much, much lower.

Here's a useful guide in your journey to -100
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fallacies


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By Nutzo on 3/25/2013 4:54:26 PM , Rating: 2
Wow, up to 250 miles on a charge. While that would cover most my driving, you still have the long charging time (unless you install an expensive 240 volt charger at you house)

I'd rather buy a hybrid like the Camry with a 620+ mile range for 1/2 the price. With the price savings I'd have enough money to by gas for over 250K miles.


By Philippine Mango on 4/1/2013 6:49:20 PM , Rating: 2
This car is obviously not about being the most economical. If you want the most economical, a Prius is where it's at...


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By Mint on 3/23/2013 2:06:29 PM , Rating: 1
Cars last for 15+ years and go through 3+ owners. I bought a BMW for $9k as a student because a well off guy paid $45k for it new.

Same thing with the Model S. One day some family will buy a $20k used Model S and be saving another $2k/year in fuel costs over a comparable vehicle. If nobody bought EVs 5 years earlier, they wouldn't have that option.

When the gov't can borrow money near zero interest and save society costs down the road much greater than that, it would be stupid not to do so.

BTW, the Model S starts at $53k after credit. It's not just the 1% who are buying them.


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By Dorkyman on 3/23/2013 2:44:55 PM , Rating: 2
I see your points but you need to take off the blinders. Objective studies have shown that the NET environmental costs are about the same; it's just that they are front-loaded in the manufacture of the car battery and in the creation of the electricity at the remote power plant.

But then, hey, most Californians (and I was once one) buy stuff mostly on cool factor, not on any rigorously-reasoned rationale. And right now Tesla is cool.


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By Mint on 3/23/2013 7:06:55 PM , Rating: 2
There's no such thing as an objective study with environmental cost, because you're forced to compare apples to oranges. Gasoline is 2-3x worse from a CO2 perspective, maybe 100x worse regarding urban pollution.

Some studies will assume new electricity generation to charge EVs will have the same mix as current power, others will rightfully consider that the marginally increased consumption will come entirely from wind and natural gas.

On top of that, you have energy security and trade deficit considerations, where EVs are a huge win in today's demand limited global market.

Cool factor only takes you so far. There are limits to how high BMW and Mercedes can jack up prices for the badge, for example.


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By Reclaimer77 on 3/23/2013 7:56:09 PM , Rating: 1
It's a lot harder to clean contaminated soil than C02 air pollution. Nature has a way of dealing, quite effectively, with C02. It's this new thing called trees and plants....

As far as I know there's no plants that can magically un-fu#k toxic waste in the soil and drinking water.

quote:
On top of that, you have energy security and trade deficit considerations, where EVs are a huge win in today's demand limited global market.


They aren't a "win" for ANYONE until they actually become practical enough to replace ICE vehicles. How many times do I need to beat this fact into your skull?


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By Mint on 3/24/2013 2:10:26 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It's a lot harder to clean contaminated soil than C02 air pollution.
If you paid attention, you'd see that I was implying CO2 is the least meaningful way of measuring pollution. Urban air pollution consists of particulates, NOx, organics/hydrocarbons, etc.

And where is the contaminated soil coming from? That's the same BS argument that nuclear opponents use. It infinitely easier to contain solid waste - whether nuclear or industrial - than air pollution. Lithium ion batteries can be almost entirely recycled, too. These aren't lead-acid batteries.

quote:
They aren't a "win" for ANYONE until they actually become practical enough to replace ICE vehicles.
Not for ANYONE? Then why is Tesla selling 500 per week?

And what's wrong with PHEV? Once the cost premium over a regular hybrid hits expected values (as with the Ford C-Max), payback becomes only a few years. Ford is projecting that 30% of their electrified vehicle sales will be plugins.


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By M'n'M on 3/23/2013 3:26:38 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Cars last for 15+ years and go through 3+ owners. I bought a BMW for $9k as a student because a well off guy paid $45k for it new

The used car marketplace will be a bit different for pure EVs. At some point in it's lifetime the owner will be looking at a new battery and the cost for that won't be cheap. Until that cost and timing are better known (not just predicted) I suspect most people are going to be pretty cautious and so the residual value of a 10 year old Tesla is going to be low. The 3'rd buyer may get one cheap but may face that cost. I wonder if that will cause more S owners to hang onto their cars for longer, getting rid of them only when the battery shows degradation ?

Any secondary owner will be living with reduced range. How reduced is an open question and will depend on the charging and driving habits of the prior owners. It'll be interesting to see if Tesla will make battery state info known to prospective secondhand buyers. Battery degradation in a hybrid, like a Prius, isn't as big a deal. A 20-30% loss may not even be noticable. A 20-30% loss in range for a pure EV may make a marginally acceptable car become unacceptable.


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By Mint on 3/23/2013 6:57:29 PM , Rating: 2
I don't think a new battery will be needed for a long time with the Model S. 15% loss after 5000 cycles can be achieved today:
http://info.a123systems.com/blog/bid/151833/Cycle-...
Even if Tesla's batteries only go 2000 cycles before 20% degradation, we're talking about 250,000-500,000 miles, which is beyond the average lifetime of an average gas vehicle.

The other thing about EVs is that once you replace the battery, its lifetime goes beyond a gas car because electric motors are extremely reliable.


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By M'n'M on 3/23/2013 10:12:48 PM , Rating: 2
If you look at the Tesla forums, Tesla is saying a 30% loss in 10 years although they hope it's only 15% in that same time. If you want to pony up 12K$ (for the big battery) when you purchase the car, they'll replace that battery when it's time. I don't know if that deal transfers with the car.


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By Mint on 3/24/2013 3:09:49 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah, there's a lot of uncertainty about real world battery cycle life, which is why it takes time for consumers to trust the technology and lab tests. That's also why government assistance can shave years off the time to get over this chicken and egg hurdle.

Thanks for directing me to those forums. I came upon this paper:
http://ma.ecsdl.org/content/MA2011-02/17/1282.full...
That suggests 15% degradation after 3000 cycles for the same Panasonic batteries that Tesla is using even under unfavorable conditions.

That 12k figure suggests that Tesla believes that there's a lot of utility left in a 10 year old battery and prices will drop quite substantially by then as well.


By 2ndGreenRevolution.com on 3/27/2013 11:16:07 AM , Rating: 2
Tesla's mission has always been to ramp up production and pass (some) cost savings to customers to broaden the appeal. Ultimately, I believe the company is shooting for a pricepoint of mid $30k to compete with compact luxury cars (3 series, A4, C class, etc)


RE: Now do it for cheaper
By highlander2107 on 3/23/2013 5:01:42 PM , Rating: 2
You stupid if you think a touch screen and fancy door handles are worth 30k


"We shipped it on Saturday. Then on Sunday, we rested." -- Steve Jobs on the iPad launch














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki