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The DNA of a frozen specimen was used to grow embryos

Australian scientists have successfully taken the first steps necessary for bringing back an extinct frog species.

The team, led by University of New South Wales paleontologist Mike Archer, has grown embryos with the revived DNA of the extinct gastric-brooding frog for the first time.

The gastric-brooding frogs were a genus of ground-dwelling frogs that were native to Queensland in eastern Australia. It was quite an extraordinary genus because it had the only two known frog species that incubated their offspring in the stomach.

However, the gastric-brooding frog became extinct in 1983.


Now, the research team has brought their DNA back to life. It did this by reviving frozen DNA samples of a gastric-brooding frog and inserting the genetic material into donor eggs. The donor eggs were those of a distant relative -- the great barred frog. But the great barred frog's DNA was deactivated by UV light.

As time went on, the cells began dividing, showing signs of growing embryos.

The embryos have not yet turned into tadpoles, but research shows that the dividing cells do, in fact, have the DNA of the extinct frog.

"We do expect to get this guy hopping again," Archer said.

While finding viable DNA and creating the frog embryos was no easy task, this opens the door to the possibility of bringing other extinct species back to life.

Source: smh.com.au



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RE: Question
By Jim Vanus on 3/19/2013 5:46:45 PM , Rating: 3
Man is a part of this planet's life system, not outside of it.

I'm tired of this "man is in the forest" BS. Man is the crown of creation, whether by divine means or evolutionary means, and will continue to define his role in the ecosystem. Now part of that role appears to be the capability to resurrect extinct species.

I'm not too worried about man's impact because the process that produced this planet's many & diverse life forms will continue to do so, as proven by life's ability to recover following past cataclysmic events.

We had better spread to other planets to secure our own survival, which could now quickly come to an end due to a meteor strike, mega-volcanic event, solar event, etc.


RE: Question
By ClownPuncher on 3/19/2013 5:59:37 PM , Rating: 2
When you introduce a species not endemic to the area and that new species devastates crops and livestock, introduces new disease and weakens the economy and ecology, why not do something about it? Dreaming of the stars and moon colonies doesn't do anything to help this particular issue at this particular time.

The frog problem down under is actually a rather large issue.


RE: Question
By Jim Vanus on 3/19/2013 7:07:42 PM , Rating: 2
Man has already come a long way in recognizing negative impacts on the environment and does do something about it. Every individual should avoid doing things that damage the environment. It is up to man to create the kind of ecosystem he wants because no other creature can.

Governments probably pose the greatest threat to the planet's ecosystems because of their proclivity for war.


RE: Question
By JPForums on 3/20/2013 8:51:15 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Governments probably pose the greatest threat to the planet's ecosystems because of their proclivity for war.
A government is a body of people, usually notably ungoverned. - Firefly

Point being, humans have the same propensity for conflict, governed or not. The difference being, under government, there are fewer, larger scale conflicts, where as without we would see dramatically more, much smaller scale conflicts. I suspect the number of deaths and amount of destruction over time would be comparable. They would just come as a constant stream rather than condensed bursts.


"Nowadays, security guys break the Mac every single day. Every single day, they come out with a total exploit, your machine can be taken over totally. I dare anybody to do that once a month on the Windows machine." -- Bill Gates

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