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Google also agreed to destroy all of this data collected in the U.S.

Google is finally settling a three-year investigation this week into a Wi-Fi incident that occurred when compiling data for its mapping service.

Google's Street View mapping cars had accidentally collected personal data, such as home wireless network passwords, between 2008 and 2010. The cars were out collecting images and data for the Street View mapping system in Google Maps, and were using an experimental computer code in the cars' software while doing so. This led to the accidental collection of personal data.


The settlement orders that Google split $7 million among 38 states in the U.S. and the District of Columbia, which were involved in the incident. Google also agreed to destroy all of this data collected in the U.S. (it's still working things out with European countries, where the same incident occurred).

Google will also deploy employee education programs that fill them in about user privacy, and will also launch a campaign about protecting information on wireless networks.

While Google has now been punished for its incident, some are not happy with the amount of the fine. For instance, Steve Pociask, the president of the American Consumer Institute, said that $7 million is nothing to a huge tech company like Google and likely won't ward off any further intrusions of privacy.

Google had a revenue of $50.2 billion in 2012 and $10.7 billion in net income.

Source: Reuters



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RE: Is there such a thing
By sprockkets on 3/13/2013 2:25:54 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I think you have to take it a step further. A better analogy would be if people drove passed your house, took pictures including that of your cars and plates, and then did that for every house on your street and neighborhood, city, state...


People already have the means to do this, legally. Tow truck companies can use the same systems the police do to scan every vehicle going by to see if it a repo. They then will legally tow that vehicle away. One such person said even with the system costing thousands of dollars it has more than paid itself many times with the profit he gets.


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