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Windows 8 gets bashed again

The fortunes of Microsoft, hardware manufacturers, and computer makers from all around the world are closely tied together. When Microsoft offers popular software, such as a new version of its Windows operating system, sales of PCs can increase significantly.
 
Dong-soo, a Samsung executive, recently said that Windows 8 is "no better than the previous Windows Vista platform", according to Forbes. The exec also blamed the poor sales of ultrabooks on the "less competitive Windows platform."

Due to the disappointing adoption of Windows 8, Samsung is focusing the attention of its memory fabrication business to mobile chips instead of traditional memory used in notebooks and desktops.
 
However, Forbes puts a different spin on the “poor” memory market with the keen assertion that Windows 8 lacks the bloat that requires such high amounts of memory as in previous versions of the operating system.

While reducing the amount of bloat in the operating system is a good thing for consumers, obviously memory makers don't feel the same way. An operating system that needs less memory means less profit and sales for these memory makers.
 
Samsung isn’t the only company to take jabs at Microsoft and Windows 8. Acer executives have not only blasted Windows 8 sales, but also Microsoft’s poor efforts in educating customers on the differences between Surface RT and Surface Pro.

Source: Forbes



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RE: Cannabilism
By CaedenV on 3/11/2013 11:38:25 AM , Rating: 2
Agreed. The bulk of 'software' in use today is web content like facebook, netflix/hulu/youtube, and news sites. If you have an old pentium 4HT with 2-4GB of ram and windowsXP then you can do all of that with no problem (so long as you are patient with your initial boot time). Annoyed that your system runs slow? Throw in an SSD and a little GPU and watch your old machine feel like new.

Fact of the matter is that most 'software' in use today is written with phones and tablets in mind, and that carries over to the desktop. these experiences are brought to people through the web, and so their internet connection is their primary limiting factor, not things like the hardware or software running on their local machine.

If we get faster phones/tablets, and better internet, then you know what happens to the average computer user? They will tie their portable device to a screen and keyboard and simply replace their desktop. When I got my phone, it replaced every portable device I own. It is awesome to have a single reliable and capable device rather than a ton of nearly-useful single-purpose devices, and I imagine that the phones and tablets that come out in the near future will have more than enough power to replace most people's desktops (provided they have the ability to hook into larger screens/speakers/keys/mice to bring the desktop experience).

My own system is nearly 2 years old now and can do just about everything without breaking a sweat, and it will probably last another 5-7 years with little upgrades here and there, and so I really wonder if I will ever build another computer for myself from scratch, or if this will turn into my home server at some point, and in 5-7 years I move to all dockable portable devices for my enduser machines.

The new consoles coming out, and 4K displays may make upgrading needed (at least for the GPU), but I can't think of another thing that I would want to do on my PC that would require any more hardware than I already have, and I am a pretty heavy user.


"We shipped it on Saturday. Then on Sunday, we rested." -- Steve Jobs on the iPad launch














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