backtop


Print 50 comment(s) - last by FiveTenths.. on Mar 13 at 12:12 PM

GM's goal is to cut weight by as much as 15 percent to reduce fuel consumption

General Motors (GM) is in the midst of developing an electric vehicle (EV) that can achieve 200 miles of battery-only range.

GM CEO Dan Akerson unveiled the project last week at the IHS CERAWeek energy conference broadcast on CNBC.com.

“There will be breakthroughs in battery technology, they’re on the horizon,” Akerson said. “We’re actually developing a car today which is really anathema to the way the auto industry works: We’re running a dual play on the technology to see which one will succeed. One will result in” a 100-mile range, “the other will be a 200-mile range.”

Akerson went on to say that fuel consumption can be reduced by 6.5 percent if the vehicle weight is cut by 10 percent. GM's goal is to cut weight by as much as 15 percent.


GM CEO Dan Akerson
 
Further, Akerson described GM's previous plans to put 500,000 green vehicles on the roads by 2017. It's doing this with its Chevrolet Volt, the new all-electric version of the Chevrolet Spark and a diesel version of the Chevrolet Cruze.

GM hopes to increase Volt sales by 20 percent this year alone.

“Everywhere you look there are opportunities to seize the energy high ground,” Akerson said. “Indeed, our leaders have been presented with an historic opportunity to create a national energy policy from a position of strength and abundance. The pillars of such a plan must include energy diversity, so we do not become dependent on any one fuel or energy source.”

Last week, Akerson called for a consumer-driven national energy policy where he'd like President Barack Obama to appoint a Blue Ribbon Commission (which would lead to the development a 30-year policy framework for energy security with progress reviews every five years).

Source: Bloomberg



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Diesel is not green
By CZroe on 3/11/2013 11:10:28 AM , Rating: 2
"Simply because" it burns as clean as gasoline? You missed where he pointed out that diesels were also more efficient. If you don't think that factors in, then I guess dino-fuel hybrid cars are never comparatively "green" no matter how fuel efficient.

Future headline:
New, green, 2025 Toyota Prius gets astounding 300MPG
Your reaction:
THAT'S NOT "GREEN!"

That said, diesel is refined from the same petroleum as I understand it and, therefore, it's not a substitute. More demand for it doesn't make things more or less green because the other refined products WILL be used.

That's also why reusable shopping bags aren't "green" in any way, shape or form. The plastic is a BYPRODUCT of oil production. The price reflects supply and demand. It's cheap because it's an abundant byproduct that has no particular market demand driving production and yet it gets produced anyway when filling a different demand (kerosene, diesel, gasoline, motor oil, Vaseline, more useful plastics, etc).

Abstain and the demand goes down and the price drops even further until the market finds a new use for it at the new lower price. Congratulations: You just saved someone else some money by spending your own money on reusable shopping bags and not using the practically free grocery bags. You also made the person selling reusable shopping bags some money. How philanthropic of you! Too bad you didn't stop a single molecule of atmospheric CO2 contribution and oil refinement continued due to the other demands.


RE: Diesel is not green
By boeush on 3/11/2013 11:43:01 AM , Rating: 3
You totally miss the point on shopping bags. The issue is not price, it's pollution. Not atmospheric pollution, but pollution in the form of plastic bags being strewn all over land and water. Plastic that is non-biodegradable, even poisonous or at least hazardous to animals when they ingest it. Plastic that clogs landfills, interfering with natural decomposition processes, leaching into groundwater, which you then drink either directly or indirectly by consuming produce grown with it. And so on.

As for 'clean' diesels, there ain't no such thing. As long as you can smell the diesel exhaust, that means you are inhaling micron-sized carcinogenic soot. And not just inhaling, but also ingesting, because that crap gets in everything. Woe be to you if you happen to live near a freeway or a busy roadway, with clouds of diesel exhaust bellowing all around you. Sure, individual cars may produce small amounts by virtue of being 'clean', but if these things become popular and wide-spread, those small amounts will tend to add together into Beijing-style toxic miasma. Especially in places where geography constrains air movement or hot summer climates promote smog formation...


RE: Diesel is not green
By Dorkyman on 3/11/2013 12:37:35 PM , Rating: 2
Hey, take care of your own neighborhood.

Where I live, there isn't a plastic bag (or any other litter, for that matter) to be seen. In fact many people pick up the stray McDonald's wrapper or straw when they go for walks. So we have no need for Benevolent Dictator telling us we cannot use plastic bags any more.

As for diesel, you need to compare it to the status quo. A diesel car will replace a gasoline car. It will get significantly better mileage. That's a plus.

I had a diesel car back in the '80s. Great car but there was some blue exhaust (no longer an issue) and the rattle of the engine at idle was irritating to some (no longer an issue). Diesels are great.


RE: Diesel is not green
By Dr of crap on 3/11/2013 12:52:48 PM , Rating: 2
Haven't been to a major "urban area" lately have you -
Dirty and full of garbage, such as plasitc bags. But then those people must not mind it either or they do something about it!


RE: Diesel is not green
By Souka on 3/11/2013 2:28:11 PM , Rating: 2
@Dorkyman: That's proably because the wildlife is eating the garbage, rain washing it down into the storm drains (which go to creeks/lakes/sea), and wind dispersing the bags more than 10ft from where you walk.

:)


RE: Diesel is not green
By boeush on 3/11/2013 5:23:13 PM , Rating: 1
Your 'Benevolent Dictator' of choice is the invisible hand of the market economy. Except it is not remotely benevolent; it is at best indifferent. At worst, it's malevolent, especially in cases where negative impacts are either not priced properly, or never priced in the first place.


RE: Diesel is not green
By random2 on 3/11/2013 6:38:45 PM , Rating: 1
Finally....someone who gets it.

People need to be more aware of the indifference shown by our corporate benefactors, (a word I use very loosely) and start voting with their wallets.


RE: Diesel is not green
By random2 on 3/11/2013 6:31:32 PM , Rating: 3
So none of the plastic bags in your neighbourhood go into the garbage?

Wish the same could be said for the neighbourhood next to yours, or the ones in the next county, state or country. You guys might be perfect but not everyone is.


RE: Diesel is not green
By CZroe on 3/11/2013 3:07:04 PM , Rating: 2
No, these days as it relates to the environment, "green" refers to the greenhouse effect and global warming and not to localized litter. Regular shopping bags are perfectly recyclable, so reusable shopping bags are promoted as "green." Got it? Litter is a completely different issue.


RE: Diesel is not green
By boeush on 3/11/2013 5:17:30 PM , Rating: 2
Who died and bequeathed you the authority to redefine not just mere words, but entire conceptual frameworks? Pollution is pollution, no matter whether it takes the form of 'litter' or not. Green policies seek to minimize pollution in particular, and all negative/disruptive effects on natural ecosystems in general.


RE: Diesel is not green
By random2 on 3/11/2013 6:19:46 PM , Rating: 2
Not to mention the gear-heads who have re chipped along with other modifications and figure the amount of soot and emissions spouting from their stacks is directly proportional to the torque and HP output of their 1 tonne diesel trucks.


RE: Diesel is not green
By Solandri on 3/11/2013 12:00:40 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
"Simply because" it burns as clean as gasoline? You missed where he pointed out that diesels were also more efficient.

Diesel isn't that much more efficient that gasoline. You can't look at MPG to compare efficiency because diesel is a denser fuel. It weighs more per gallon than gasoline, or put another way if you processed a gallon of diesel to convert it to gasoline, you'd get about 1.15 gallons of gasoline. That's why chemists do their calculations by mass, not by volume.

After you account for that, diesel is a litte more efficient than gasoline primarily because of the higher compression ratios used in diesel engines. In that respect it's similar to a high-octane gasoline. Also, most of the vehicles which use it (trucks) are not general-purpose. They have one task (hauling loads of x tons) and their engines can be designed with that exact load in mind.

quote:
That said, diesel is refined from the same petroleum as I understand it and, therefore, it's not a substitute. More demand for it doesn't make things more or less green because the other refined products WILL be used.

There's some wriggle room in the refining process, and you can to some extent vary the amount of diesel vs. gasoline you get out of a barrel of oil. It's partly dependent on the type of crude oil (e.g. heavy Alaskan crude favors diesel, Texas light sweet crude favors gasoline, though diesel and gasoline are very similar in the hierarchy of things you make from petroleum). And heavier fuels like diesel can be "cooked" to break up its molecules into lighter fuels like gasoline. Going the other way is harder.

quote:
That's also why reusable shopping bags aren't "green" in any way, shape or form. The plastic is a BYPRODUCT of oil production.

I always figured they weren't "green" because they're being thrown away in landfills after a single use. I'd rather we use plastics for semi-durable things like car body panels and TV exteriors, instead of single-use disposable items.


RE: Diesel is not green
By CZroe on 3/11/2013 3:14:40 PM , Rating: 2
A great read. Thanks. BTW, I think you missed "reusable" when you responded to that last quote of mine. ;)

Also, as I understand it, the plastic from plastic bags isn't appropriate for most durable/semi-durable uses or else there would be demand for it and it would be used for it. That's not to say that the market won't find a suitable use, but a more suitable use after we stop using it for shopping bags would either be completely new/novel (how convenient) or now financially viable only due to the drop in demand/price.


RE: Diesel is not green
By Jaybus on 3/11/2013 12:09:34 PM , Rating: 2
It is not quite obvious that a hybrid is in fact more green. If it uses less petroleum, then it is because it is running on battery. So one must factor in the charging of the battery. How much coal, gas, or oil had to be burned to charge the battery? Is it really greener? Well, it depends on where it is charged. I suppose that if you charge it here in Tennessee where TVA produces 47% of its electricity with nuclear (38%), hydro (8,3%), and wind/solar (0.7%), why then yes it is. If you live somewhere that has shut down their nuclear facilities, well then unless wind and solar get orders of magnitude better than they are now, then probably not.


RE: Diesel is not green
By Dorkyman on 3/11/2013 12:41:15 PM , Rating: 2
Great article in the WSJ today about this very topic. The data shows that it takes a HUGE amount of energy and CO2 generation to make an electric car, and that the electric car's net CO2 footprint only becomes less than that of an ICE car after 50,000 miles of driving.


RE: Diesel is not green
By Mint on 3/12/2013 7:27:48 AM , Rating: 2
CO2 is a tiny part of pollution. It merely has the biggest buzzword.

Urban air pollution is far more significant in terms of health issues. "Dirty" cities are a in fact more efficient economically and environmentally on a per-capita basis, but it also means that pollutants effect more people before they becomes benign.

The other thing is that new electricity generation is almost all natural gas or wind. The WSJ article mentioned 6oz of CO2 per mile, which works out to over twice the CO2 per kWh of natural gas. So they made the incorrect assumption that each new EV produced results in electricity generation proportional to our existing mix.


RE: Diesel is not green
By CZroe on 3/11/2013 3:02:51 PM , Rating: 2
I wasn't talking about plug-in hybrids. In fact, I specifically excluded them with the word "only" before I accidentally lost it when editing for clarity. "...dino-fuel [only] hybrid cars..." Oops.

And, yeah, the futility of all this is kind of my other point.


RE: Diesel is not green
By random2 on 3/11/2013 6:16:11 PM , Rating: 2
""Simply because" it burns as clean as gasoline? You missed where he pointed out that diesels were also more efficient. If you don't think that factors in, then I guess dino-fuel hybrid cars are never comparatively "green" no matter how fuel efficient."

I think you might have missed the point where Flunk mentioned they were fuel efficient.


"This is about the Internet.  Everything on the Internet is encrypted. This is not a BlackBerry-only issue. If they can't deal with the Internet, they should shut it off." -- RIM co-CEO Michael Lazaridis














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki