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Print 45 comment(s) - last by TakinYourPoint.. on Mar 12 at 5:18 AM

Apple rules above the clouds

Gogo is one of the most popular and successful in-flight internet service providers in the world. Now, the company has given some statistics on devices used to connect to its in-flight networks.

The statistics show that 67% of the devices used to connect to Gogo during flights are smartphones and tablets. Tablets are the most preferred device connecting to its network at 35 percent, followed by laptop at 33 percent and smartphones at 33 percent.

The most common mobile operating system that connects to the network during flights comes from Apple with the iPad being the most common device overall. 84% of all devices that connect to the Gogo network during the flight run iOS while 16% use Android.

BlackBerry and Windows Phone/Mobile devices each make up less than 1% of in-flight connections.


The most common task performed using these devices in-flight is average web surfing. Gogo says that passengers are accessing their personal e-mail accounts, using social media sites, checking sports scores, and shopping. Business travelers more often use their work e-mail and finalize reports, listing those two activities as their most frequent tasks during the flight.

With Apple devices so popular during flights, it would come as no surprise that Safari is the most popular browser to access Gogo networks. The second most popular browser is Internet Explorer followed by Chrome and Firefox.
 
While Apple devices are the most common that access Gogo in-flight, Android is catching up. In 2011, only 3.2% of devices accessing the network were Android and so far in 2013, Android accounted for 16% of usage.

Source: Gogo



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RE: My thought...
By karlostomy on 3/9/2013 12:50:35 AM , Rating: 2
@ typ

That is actually a good point, but there is more to it.

It is quite possible that android has a lot of lower end users that simply cannot afford inflight wifi and that would also partly explain the disparity of global internet usage.

Having said that, it must also be noted that
quote:
In 2011, only 3.2% of devices accessing the network were Android and so far in 2013, Android accounted for 16% of usage.


Wow.
While apple undoubtedly has the upper hand in usage statistics (for now) this does seems to be changing rapidly.

Simply said, android is currently trouncing ios in market share and also catching up fast in actual usage statistics.
The stats don't lie.

This certainly points to the possibility that some of the traditional apple consumers (that have more disposable income) are now migrating to the android platform.

I guess there is a lot to be said for competition.
Consumers benefit from better features, higher quality products and lower prices.
Eventually consumers realise where the value is and seem to be slowly moving away from apple.


RE: My thought...
By TakinYourPoints on 3/12/2013 5:12:33 AM , Rating: 2
I think it is more a matter that as more Android devices get sold, more of them are inevitably in the high end category. The notion that iDevice users are the ones who use high end features is a silly one. It is all about what the device is capable of, whether it is running iOS or Android or BB or whatever.


RE: My thought...
By TakinYourPoints on 3/12/2013 5:18:44 AM , Rating: 2
The thing to forget is that this isn't about in-flight wifi, these usage statistics reflect overall usage trends. Even with a 5:1 difference in marketshare iOS still makes up over half of mobile traffic, the bulk of app downloads and mobile developer profits, and it even makes up the majority of Google's mobile ad revenue.

Again, it doesn't come down to the user, it comes down to the type of device being used. A GS3 or GN2 gets the same sort of usage that an iPhone does, there just aren't as many out there compared to the lower end devices given out for cheap or free.


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