backtop


Print 45 comment(s) - last by TakinYourPoint.. on Mar 12 at 5:18 AM

Apple rules above the clouds

Gogo is one of the most popular and successful in-flight internet service providers in the world. Now, the company has given some statistics on devices used to connect to its in-flight networks.

The statistics show that 67% of the devices used to connect to Gogo during flights are smartphones and tablets. Tablets are the most preferred device connecting to its network at 35 percent, followed by laptop at 33 percent and smartphones at 33 percent.

The most common mobile operating system that connects to the network during flights comes from Apple with the iPad being the most common device overall. 84% of all devices that connect to the Gogo network during the flight run iOS while 16% use Android.

BlackBerry and Windows Phone/Mobile devices each make up less than 1% of in-flight connections.


The most common task performed using these devices in-flight is average web surfing. Gogo says that passengers are accessing their personal e-mail accounts, using social media sites, checking sports scores, and shopping. Business travelers more often use their work e-mail and finalize reports, listing those two activities as their most frequent tasks during the flight.

With Apple devices so popular during flights, it would come as no surprise that Safari is the most popular browser to access Gogo networks. The second most popular browser is Internet Explorer followed by Chrome and Firefox.
 
While Apple devices are the most common that access Gogo in-flight, Android is catching up. In 2011, only 3.2% of devices accessing the network were Android and so far in 2013, Android accounted for 16% of usage.

Source: Gogo



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: This not that surprising
By Tony Swash on 3/8/2013 2:11:03 PM , Rating: 0
quote:
Looks like the Apple fanboys just can't handle the truth.

Apple products are more expensive - fact
Apple users spend more on apps - fact

People generally buy Android phones/tablets because they are less expensive.
People who are looking for cheaper products are less likely to spend even more money on apps or expensive wireless service on a plane.


Let's take your facts as given for the sake of argument.

Those facts change nothing about the points I was making.

A platform is precisely that, something upon which other things stand. In the case of a computing platform such as Windows, iOS, Android etc what stands on that platform are third party businesses.

Those third party business consists of things like OEMs, software developers, peripheral makers, digital content sellers, web commerce businesses etc, etc. The one thing all those businesses have in common is that they will go where the money is, whatever platform can deliver the best commercial results for the least spend will attract their attention the most.

So the commercial ecosystem that a platform supports is critical in terms of attracting third party support, and third party support is critical in terms of building a superstructure on top of a platform and the superstructure is critical in terms of delivering benefit and value to the individual end user.

Why Android users actually use their platform less than iOS users and generate so much less commercial activity is an interesting question but it doesn't matter in terms of it's affect on platform performance. It could be the result of Apple users being gullible rich fools and Android user being canny bargain hunters, or it could be that the iOS ecosystem is better integrated and the iOS platform does a better job of encouraging end user use. It doesn't matter when it comes to it's impact on platform performance. The mere fact that iOS is a better platform upon which to make money, sell things, distribute content, sell advertising etc, makes it a better platform for third party enterprises. And that has big long term consequences.


RE: This not that surprising
By karlostomy on 3/9/2013 2:19:28 AM , Rating: 2
Hmmm,

Tony, it's disconcerting that you are downplaying the suddenly burgeoning gap in marketshare between android and apple ios.
I would suggest that growing marketshare is always a good thing. How can it possibly be a bad thing? Now before you get all huffy, read on.

Marketshare is a precursor to revenue and profits.
For proof of this, look at the 'loss leader' business model of the ps3 and xbox360. For years, both Sony and MS bent over backwards to establish market share, because marketshare is what it's all about . Both of those companies established this business model because they knew that profits flow from market share, eventually.

Interestingly, apple is being walloped by android in terms of marketshare as of right now.

While Apple may have the upper hand in generating revenue for third party business at present, this may be a result of the prior product infrastructure that apple developed as a result of its prior marketshare dominance. There simply was nothing that competed with apple phone and tablet for a long time.

Now, a new player is in town and really taking marketshare away from apple. This much is fact. As such, the previous apple infrastructure that allowed third party business to thrive, is diminishing and being made available to android.
I would wager this shift will take some time though.

The article has already pointed us toward some evidence that this trend is occurring right now:
quote:
In 2011, only 3.2% of devices accessing the network were Android and so far in 2013, Android accounted for 16% of usage.


Not only is android taking over in terms of market share but consumers are also starting to spend more money within the android ecosystem.
Sure, not near apple spending yet, but give it some time.

Third party business will pick up on this evidence soon enough, even if you don't want to believe or admit it.


RE: This not that surprising
By Tony Swash on 3/9/2013 5:49:58 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Marketshare is a precursor to revenue and profits.


Except when it isn't. Symbian.

quote:
For proof of this, look at the 'loss leader' business model of the ps3 and xbox360. For years, both Sony and MS bent over backwards to establish market share, because marketshare is what it's all about . Both of those companies established this business model because they knew that profits flow from market share, eventually.


Except in neither case did the profits actually flow (neither investment has delivered a return on capital) and in neither case do the respective platforms have a majority share of the market.

The problem is that market share was such a good proxy for measuring relative platform performance for so long during the PC era that most people forget it was always just a proxy measurement of something else (commercial success, platform utilisation, third party support etc). Now that we are faced with a mass mobile device market where the connection between platform success and market share is much flimsier a lot of people get a bit disorientated. They start to think market share is a great thing in and of itself. Again consider Symbian.

As for Android catching up iOS in platform performance, given the multipliers involved it looks like Android needs a minimum of a two to three billion installed base just to match iOS. That's going to take a while


RE: This not that surprising
By karlostomy on 3/9/2013 9:28:45 PM , Rating: 2
Tony, you have inadvertently actually supported my original premise about the importance of marketshare:

Market share is everything. Your examples do nothing to negate that statement.

The ps3 and 360 prove that point. Neither of them had overwhelming market share. I merely used them as an eample of how important it is for major corporations to establish marketshare.

That symbian comparison is an interesting one. I would agree that this might be a good example that marketshare, as you suggest, is not an absolute guarantee of record profits.
However, factual evidence suggests that in android's case there is a growing trend of increased consumer spending and third party participation that was not evident on Symbian during its day.
Interestingly, ios market share (and gradually consumer spending) is being usurped by android, much like Symbian's market share was usurped by android in its day.
The evidence supports this.

I encourage you to think about that for a while.

With regard to the premise of the importance of market share for big business:
Corporations actively pursue overwhelming marketshare (yes, including apple!) because they know it is the first step in generating those record profits via consumer participation and third party support. The fact that some corporations don't succeed in establishing the overwhelming marketshare, or don't fully capitalise on marketshare when it is established (symbian) doesn't negate the premise itself.

For a better example of overwhelming marketshare and resulting profits and third party support, consider these products:
- ps2
- Windows during the 90s
- ios in the last few years.

All of the above had overwhelming marketshare and as a result generated substantial profits and third party support - some faster than others. For every one market failure like 'symbian' you care to mention there are about ten other cases that support my view.

Let's not kid ourselves:
Apple has had its day and is losing its marketshare to android, just like symbian did. I am not saying 'teh applez is doomed' or any such rubbish. Apple is still currently making record profits as a result of its past dominant marketshare, clever marketing and better implementation of established ideas from days gone by. However, as the ios marketshare continues to shrink, it will inevitably lead to lost support from consumers and third party suppliers.

That's not rocket science, even for apple fans.

I do agree with you though that it may take a few more years for this slow transition to android consumer penetration and profit realisation to take effect.

The best thing about this though, is that it is the consumer that benefits, not the corporation.
For some reason you seem to struggle with this concept.


RE: This not that surprising
By retrospooty on 3/10/2013 10:42:03 AM , Rating: 2
"Why Android users actually use their platform less than iOS users"

Actually Tony, this (like most of your past arguments" needs to be retired as well. The latest #'s are out and now Android has surpassed IOS in usage as well.

http://www.itechpost.com/articles/6320/20130309/an...

Google is on the rise, and Apple is on the decline. Hey wouldnt it be funny if your prediction of the worlds favorite tech company stock hitting $1000 mark came true, only the opposite? Because Google just might get there soon. Wouldnt that just burn? ;)

http://www.cnbc.com/id/100537856


RE: This not that surprising
By Tony Swash on 3/10/2013 12:49:27 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Actually Tony, this (like most of your past arguments" needs to be retired as well. The latest #'s are out and now Android has surpassed IOS in usage as well.

http://www.itechpost.com/articles/6320/20130309/an...


I couldn't work out from your link what was being measured and by who. All the data based referenced evidence shows the same, iOS users utilise their platform to do significantly more per user than Android users. Huffing and puffing won't change that.


RE: This not that surprising
By momorere on 3/10/2013 1:30:41 PM , Rating: 2
Of course you can't read it properly as it is yet another article that proves you wrong based on your selective "facts". Since you like Business Insider and Forbes so much, I thought I'd show you a few interesting articles from them.

We all know that the "iWatch" rumors are just a pathetic attempt to keep investors interested for a little longer.

http://news.yahoo.com/forbes-apple-may-planted-iwa...

http://www.forbes.com/sites/haydnshaughnessy/2013/...

You have said numerous times how crApple is moving into the enterprise sector and is starting to take over yet, Samsung is getting in with some of the largest enterprise customers.

http://www.businessinsider.com/american-airlines-p...

Even some of the top crApple writers/bloggers are making the switch.

http://www.businessinsider.com/apple-fanboy-loves-...

http://www.businessinsider.com/why-ihnatko-switche...


RE: This not that surprising
By retrospooty on 3/10/2013 3:13:58 PM , Rating: 2
"Of course you can't read it properly as it is yet another article that proves you wrong based on your selective "facts".

Exactly... When you post selective facts, its easy to see your are trying to mislead people... When you actually start believing in them, its a whole other direction. I wonder which Tony really is.


RE: This not that surprising
By Tony Swash on 3/10/2013 8:01:59 PM , Rating: 2
The link you posted points to an article that contains the following statistic:

quote:
All that has changed now that Androids make up an astonishing 37 percent of the usage share in comparison to Apple's 25 percent share.


It doesn't say of what.

So I followed the link to the linked Motely Fool article which says:

quote:
Fast-forward a few months later and Android's usage share has reached 37%, far above Apple's approximate 25% share.


Again I ask - what was measured and how was it measured.?

The article seems fact and data free. What web usage is being measured, how is it being measured? Without quoting sources you can claim anything. I can claim that 76% of iPhobes have inferiority complexes, it sounds plausible to me but with no data sources to back it up it's nothing more than my opinion.

I suppose it's the difference between the lightweight tabloid end of tech journalism, which unsurprisingly the iPhobes seem to prefer, and the quality end of tech journalism (such as the excellent Asymco site) which is full of data and data source references, which iOS users tend to prefer. Brandishing stereotypes is such fun.

http://techpinions.com/does-the-rise-of-androids-m...


RE: This not that surprising
By momorere on 3/10/2013 8:26:03 PM , Rating: 2
Aww, no comments on my links ? I was waiting for them to get Swashed. So I'm assuming that all my Forbes and Business Insider links are invalid EXCEPT when they are pro-crApple ? Geez, who would have thought ?


RE: This not that surprising
By retrospooty on 3/10/2013 3:10:34 PM , Rating: 2
"I couldn't work out from your link what was being measured and by who"

Of course not. Put in a good dish of denial and its easy not underdstand anything that is going on. GEt used to it though, because its happening, and you will see more and more of it, so prepare your spin now. Let me spell it out for you... The odd argument you keep using of utilization is done, over, move on, Android has caught up. It caught up in sales, then it caught up in features, then it surpassed in both. Then it caught up in hardware and caught up in smooth fluent UI then it surpassed in both. Then it caught up in software/apps and utilization... I will leave the nest step to your imagination.

The point is, regardless of your huffing and puffing, Android is a juggernaut that cannot be avoided. It is not only cheaper, it is better and people are catching on. It will catch up and surpass in all angles eventually unless something better comes along to knock it off. With its ony real competitor meandering away its lead and regurgitating the same products with hardly noticeable impreovements, it seems it happening faster and faster. Better get your spin prepared for that too.

Here is a tidbit for you. Analysts are expecting year over year Apples sales to decrease and profits to decrease for the current quarter. The 1st time since the iPhones release. Get your spin ready for that one too, cuz its coming.

Better yet, try and be a man and detach your sense of self worth from a company and put it where it belongs, back on yourself. Remove Apple and you are a pretty cool, sensible guy with a good head. Add Apple, and you start reeking of fanboyism, denial and blindness.


RE: This not that surprising
By Cheesew1z69 on 3/10/2013 5:49:28 PM , Rating: 2
Android is a failure, Tony says it so it must be true!


RE: This not that surprising
By retrospooty on 3/10/2013 10:27:23 PM , Rating: 2
I believe he called Android a "spectacular failure" LOL... What he is really worried about is IOS repeating the same path that Mac did. That's OK. He can huff and puff all he wants, that fact is that Android is the # 1 mobile OS. As an OS and a platform it is firing on all pistons. Its improving sang growing by leaps and bounds while the competition stagnates.


"If a man really wants to make a million dollars, the best way would be to start his own religion." -- Scientology founder L. Ron. Hubbard











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki