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Those who wish to avoid system should quit Verizon, AT&T, Comcast, or Time Warner service

After months of delays, a "six strikes" system designed to curb copyright infringement will go live in the United States, affecting customers on many of the nations' top internet service providers (ISPs).  While avoiding the most draconian of punishments proposed in past plans -- severing offenders' internet connections -- the system will carry serious consequences including connection throttling and forced "education" from anti-piracy groups.

The nation's top two mobile carriers -- Verizon Communications Inc. (VZ)/Vodafone Group Plc. (LON:VOD) joint subsidiary Verizon Wireless and AT&T, Inc. (T) -- are both participating (as is Verizon Communications’ cable network).  Also onboard is top cable internet provider Comcast Corp. (CMCSA), a company that knows a thing or two about throttling.  Rounding out the early adopters is Time Warner Cable, Inc. (TWC), a company known for its tireless efforts to stomp out municipal cable.  The group, along with its big media partners, is known as the Center for Copyright Information.

The Daily Dot was the first to report that the system would go online this week.  The system had been delayed for months due to issues with testing servers getting knocked offline by Hurricane Sandy.

The CCI's so-called Copyright Alert System (CAS) just had a shiny new website and promotion video pop up on YouTube, lending credence to the report that the system will be deployed next week.


CCI Website
CCI's new website just went live.

Under the plan, copyright watchdogs like the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) -- groups that have been internationally involved in convictions or settlements involving their own "theft" of independent artists' work -- will join peer-to-peer networks or BitTorrent transfers and log internet protocol (IP) addresses of people who are downloading "confirmed infringed content".

The first warning carries no action, but later warnings carry ISP-specific "Mitigation actions".  The (sort of) good news is that there is a path to appeal warnings.  Writes the CCI:

There is a $35 filing fee, which may be waived if you meet affordability criteria. The fee will be refunded if your challenge is successful.

Still, the system is a concern for real estate owners and Wi-Fi cafe owners, in that their services could be limited due to their customers’ actions.  In many cases, it would be near impossible for such entities to police their customers’ actions.

The simple solution for business people in that situation is to cancel their service with AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, or Time Warner and seek a local alternative.  

Of course that approach could be difficult in some regions, and may become infeasible if more ISPs jump on the CCI bandwagon.  For now, though, there are alternatives for many customers who want to avoid the system.

Source: Daily Dot



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April fools came early
By mike66 on 2/25/2013 5:50:30 PM , Rating: 2
It's a joke right. Nobody could be that stupid,do you all relise that you can download past this system without any effort. PirateBay has Anonymous Downloading links which simply sets up a VPN to an online server, your ISP can't see what's being downloaded and where from. So thank you MS ( and the piratebay ) for the obvious solution. Are we learning yet!




RE: April fools came early
By Bytre on 2/25/2013 10:25:03 PM , Rating: 2
Your ISP isn't monitoring your data. MPAA / RIAA is. They join all the torrents on tpb and other popular and open trackers with a custom bittorrent client that logs the IPs of the other peers on the torrent. They hand those IP addresses over to your ISP.


RE: April fools came early
By mike66 on 2/26/2013 3:03:00 AM , Rating: 3
They will only get the IP for the server I VPN too, that address changes all the time as the bay does not want it's customers punished for being their customers, it's all done from other countries which would tell MPIAA and the like to take a flying leap. Oh and by the way I belong to a ISP which refuses to deal with the copy right clowns, yah for Australia's biggest telephone company telstra.


RE: April fools came early
By Shadowmaster625 on 2/26/2013 11:07:23 AM , Rating: 2
He's right. I remember reading years ago about setting up a VPN to get around all this crap. Now its so simple its just transparent. You dont even set anything up. There is no way for these power mongers to stop this. They are 5 years behind. Once they figure out a way to stop VPNs, we will have already moved onto something else. You can encode large amounts of data into any audio or video stream. If the sender and receiver both possess the original video, then all the data on the stream can be altered slightly to store encrypted data. But it would still be a perfectly valid video file too. What are they going to do to stop that, block video streams? It is absolutely pointless, just like it is pointless for the FBI to try and spy on hardcore criminals who have smartphones with custom basebands that frickin encode voice data into a completely different voice data stream before sending. They have absolutely no clue what the criminals are saying, or even who is talking. All they hear is "honey, pick up some eggs at the store on your way home". Encoded within that bitstream is the actual data. They or anyone else has no frickin clue whether something is buried in there or not. It is way over the bureaucrats' heads how any of this stuff works, or how unstoppable it all is. But they continue to suck off a hundred billion a year for nothing.


RE: April fools came early
By Shadowmaster625 on 2/26/2013 11:07:24 AM , Rating: 2
He's right. I remember reading years ago about setting up a VPN to get around all this crap. Now its so simple its just transparent. You dont even set anything up. There is no way for these power mongers to stop this. They are 5 years behind. Once they figure out a way to stop VPNs, we will have already moved onto something else. You can encode large amounts of data into any audio or video stream. If the sender and receiver both possess the original video, then all the data on the stream can be altered slightly to store encrypted data. But it would still be a perfectly valid video file too. What are they going to do to stop that, block video streams? It is absolutely pointless, just like it is pointless for the FBI to try and spy on hardcore criminals who have smartphones with custom basebands that frickin encode voice data into a completely different voice data stream before sending. They have absolutely no clue what the criminals are saying, or even who is talking. All they hear is "honey, pick up some eggs at the store on your way home". Encoded within that bitstream is the actual data. They or anyone else has no frickin clue whether something is buried in there or not. It is way over the bureaucrats' heads how any of this stuff works, or how unstoppable it all is. But they continue to suck off a hundred billion a year for nothing.


RE: April fools came early
By tecknurd on 2/25/2013 11:34:34 PM , Rating: 2
A packet firewall can read if a packet for a VPN is being used. Then the connection could just be cut off at that point.


RE: April fools came early
By mike66 on 2/26/2013 2:47:38 AM , Rating: 2
being cut off for using a VPN? That's only half the users out there, will not happen.


RE: April fools came early
By bodar on 2/26/2013 3:49:09 AM , Rating: 2
"Oh I'm sure you were just 'working from home and needed to access the corporate network.' Do you take me for an idiot, sir? Only pirates use VPN. We're onto you and your shenanigans."


"Well, we didn't have anyone in line that got shot waiting for our system." -- Nintendo of America Vice President Perrin Kaplan














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