backtop


Print 53 comment(s) - last by tng.. on Feb 26 at 3:07 PM


Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer
No more telecommuting for Yahoo workers effective this summer

Working from home is definitely not for everyone. For many people, working from home means more distractions and less productivity. For others, it means the ability to work your own hours and while still being an efficient employee. Yahoo has had a number of workers who work exclusively from home and CEO Marissa Mayer doesn't like that.

It surfaced late last week that Yahoo had told hundreds of workers that currently have work from home agreements in place that they have two options. One of those options is to stop working from home and begin coming into a Yahoo office effective in June. The other option for these work from home employees is to quit.

An e-mail marked proprietary and confidential has surfaced from Yahoo that says speed and quality are sacrificed when people work from home.

"To become the absolute best place to work, communication and collaboration will be important, so we need to be working side-by-side. That is why it is critical that we are all present in our offices. Some of the best decisions and insights come from hallway and cafeteria discussions, meeting new people, and impromptu team meetings. Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home. We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together," the memo reads.

It remains unclear what exactly will happen to some of Yahoo's remote workers who don't live near a Yahoo office. AllThingsD reports that Yahoo staffers have written in complaining that they were initially hired under the assumption that they would be able to work remotely with more flexibility. Yahoo has now changed and has given these workers an ultimatum to come to the office or work somewhere else. Yahoo has offered no official comment on the move at this time.

Mayer recently said that the search deal with it and Bing was underperforming and it appears that she is doing everything possible to improve Yahoo's performance.

Sources: Business Insider, AllThingsD



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By AntiM on 2/25/2013 8:39:35 AM , Rating: 5
Working remotely has its advantages and disadvantages, both to the worker and the company. In this day in age, I think a person could work from Antarctica and still contribute productively, depending on what they do. I know plenty of people that are much more productive from home, considering the fact that there are plenty of distractions when at work.

Her arguments seem weak to me; seems like a layoff, without having to announce layoffs.




RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By steven975 on 2/25/2013 9:06:17 AM , Rating: 4
It goes both ways.

If one is doing an operational/maintenance role, working at home can definitely work.

When Yahoo needs to make things that are cutting-edge and require ideas and real collaboration...it doesn't.

And something tells me Yahoo is filled with under-performers working at home.


RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By Flunk on 2/25/13, Rating: 0
RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By Reclaimer77 on 2/25/2013 9:13:01 AM , Rating: 3
Yup. Every telecommuter I know spends a significant portion of the day on personal tasks or just goofing off. It's human nature. If nobody is there to "crack the whip", you're going to get by on doing just enough work to, well, get by.


RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By Makaveli on 2/25/2013 9:22:07 AM , Rating: 5
lol there are people in the office that only do just enough to get by I don't see what the difference is when doing it at home.

It sounds like they just want to lay people off without making a big deal about it.


By Reclaimer77 on 2/25/2013 9:44:39 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
lol there are people in the office that only do just enough to get by I don't see what the difference is when doing it at home.


Hey, no argument here.


By woody1 on 2/25/2013 11:13:24 AM , Rating: 2
Agreed. It's just as easy to procrastinate in the office as it is when telecommuting. You can always find somebody to talk to about unproductive things. Also, when you attend meetings in person, it's harder to multitask. When teleconferencing, you can sometimes get work done while people are prattling on.


RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By chmilz on 2/25/2013 10:41:04 AM , Rating: 5
Home office guy here. I'm the top sales guy in my company, with the most growth year after year, selling at the highest profit. My peers who chose to be based out of an office average 1/4 of my total sales, and make far less profit.

Why? They are micromanaged. They spend considerable time doing BS reporting to satisfy the boss who's up to his ears in paperwork 10ft away.

Do I goof off? You bet your ass I do (this post is a case in point). What I can tell you though is that I get a lot more done here than I did at the office since I don't have a constant stream of people coming by to chit-chat and waste my time.

Also, lunch is SOOOOOOO much better at home. It's not easy to toast a fresh sandwich while french pressing your favorite roast at the office...


RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By Reclaimer77 on 2/25/2013 11:15:22 AM , Rating: 1
Yeah but you're in sales. Way different than the average IT telecommute. You're motivated. If you don't sell (I'm assuming) you don't get paid (as much). You're obviously a very driven individual.

quote:
Why? They are micromanaged. They spend considerable time doing BS reporting to satisfy the boss who's up to his ears in paperwork 10ft away.


Exactly. I think it's a great thing that people can flourish in their comfort zones, as you have, due to technology.

I hope nobody thought I meant all telecommuters are slackers lol. Just the ones I know :)


By chmilz on 2/25/2013 11:31:48 AM , Rating: 4
I'm willing to bet that a lot of people offer the same productivity either way. The only difference is how the time is wasted. At the office you get nagged by 82 different people and get no work done. At home you screw the pooch and vacuum the house. No real difference if you only manage 40 minutes of honest work.


RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By Falacer on 2/25/2013 12:33:07 PM , Rating: 2
While not in a corporate environment my mom has worked from home for over 20 years now doing Medical billing. It allows her the freedom to schedule meetings, pickups & etc. with the doctor's that best suits her busy life.

Prior to working strictly from home; she did the same thing for a small local company that gave it's employee's the option to work from home. However they still had to come into the office one day per work.

I agree with other posters this sounds like an attempt to lay off some staff without having to use the term.


By Falacer on 2/25/2013 12:34:57 PM , Rating: 2
Oops typo... meant to say one day per week.


By jdietz on 2/25/2013 10:02:03 AM , Rating: 2
I'm a lazy procrastinator. I wrote an Excel macro to do data analysis work (that I used to do) solely because I'm lazy. Though I work at the office most days (and from home when I'm sick), it doesn't preclude me from being lazy.


RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By jimbojimbo on 2/25/2013 11:42:17 AM , Rating: 3
There must be a lot of telecommuters reading these comments.


RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By xti on 2/25/2013 10:35:50 AM , Rating: 1
every major company allows remote work - it cuts down tremendously on real estate space/costs at offices, cube rotations (even though they kinda suck) becomes possible...

It sounds like their middle management is weak otherwise, this would never be an issue because of said cost savings they are foregoing - which just means the company is losing control of its own.

every other large corp seems to handle it just fine.


RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By tng on 2/25/2013 3:17:08 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It sounds like their middle management is weak
Maybe, but she does have valid points. I have noticed that most of the good ideas in our company occur when people get together as a group and just throw ideas out. These are never organized, planned meetings, just something that starts as a discussion over a cubicle wall or a couple of engineers talking at lunch.

I have also witnessed when input should be gathered from someone who is working from home, they are often excluded from the discussion, since nobody thinks to call them.


RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By xti on 2/26/2013 11:32:31 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I have also witnessed when input should be gathered from someone who is working from home, they are often excluded from the discussion, since nobody thinks to call them.


that is neither here nor there. if someone is a stakeholder in a meeting about X topic, a meeting invite should always include all people, a dial-in, and most of the time a webinar style connection (live meeting, etc).

And those it reaches can always forward to whom they think should be involved.

thats a simple concept anyone at a large corp should have tattoo'd in their brain from day 1.


By tng on 2/26/2013 3:07:04 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
if someone is a stakeholder in a meeting about X topic, a meeting invite should always include all people
That is the problem, allot of meetings where I work are just brainstorming sessions (not an official meeting) there are often impromptu discussions about Customer X solution or Customer Y sale and it is surprising how many issues get solved this way. Unfortunately if you are out of the office (I am gone at least 50%) you are SOL as far as input on the topic.


RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By cyberguyz on 2/25/2013 10:56:11 AM , Rating: 2
+1 to the advantages and disadvantages.

Pluses:
+ Don't have to face a 1+hr one-way daily commute.
+ Save a ton of money on gas/vehicle wear & tear.
+ Don't have to pack lunches or buy at the local "choke & puke" near the office.
+ Less people milling around my office so I can focus (see the other side of this coin below).
+You can be a slob and work in your jammies/skin if you want (as long as you don't do any video conferencing).

Minuses:
- Since all business meetings take place using your personal phone, it is unavailable to family members use.
- If you have small kids milling about the home can be a bigger distraction than co-workers.
- You often end up putting a LOT more time into your work -- often I pull 10-12 hour days when working at home whereas I can work a more 'normal 9-10 hrs if I go into the office. Burn-out is a big danger of working@home.
- No face time with your co-workers or employees.
- You really need a room your can disappear into for this to work.


By Lord 666 on 2/25/2013 12:08:23 PM , Rating: 2
With the right VoIP corporate phone system, you can make an iOS/Android device a softphone and make it appear as your desk phone using VPN. The technology has been around for more than 10 years.

Like others have said, what Yahoo is doing is a silent layoff. Even in my the traditionally in-person required companies, they are now allowing telecommuting and even telemedicine.


RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By Motoman on 2/25/2013 11:21:54 AM , Rating: 2
Yahoo is going the opposite way of pretty much everybody else...several years ago, IBM bought the company I was working for, and everybody got a choice - either you're an office worker, or you're a remote worker. Office workers got offices/cubes at an office, and had to go in to work everyday. And no cell phone. Remote workers worked from home, or wherever, and got cell phones.

They really pushed people to work remotely, to be honest...the savings in dedicated office space is enormous. And really, you can interact pretty well as a member of a team with modern technology as a remote worker...definitely a case where embracing new technology gets big improvements.

Also, she is a serious CILF.


RE: Sounds like an attempt at downsizing
By zephyrprime on 2/25/2013 12:26:33 PM , Rating: 3
Would definitely hit.


By Lord 666 on 2/25/2013 1:44:30 PM , Rating: 2
Nah, this girl has much more talent all around plus a bigger bank account.

http://www.spanx.com/category/index.jsp?categoryId...


By Souka on 2/25/2013 3:01:09 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I think a person could work from Antarctica and still contribute productively, depending on what they do


Yep, zactly.

For a couple seasons I worked in Antartica doing server based administration for McMurdo base... while programming for a utilities company in Seattle.

The biggest factor was missing out on the office camaraderie back in Seattle, but I got my work done on-time.

:)


By cyberguyz on 2/26/2013 8:14:30 AM , Rating: 2
My employer tried this. It didn't work. Everyone ignored him even though he was the top dog in my company.

What's he gonna do about it? Fire everyone? In my company only 1 in 5 people are not in a position that they cannot telecommute. That 4 out of 5 people do work at home at least 2 days out of a 5-day week. So what's he gonna do?

Firing even 15% of your workforce is corporate suicide.


“Then they pop up and say ‘Hello, surprise! Give us your money or we will shut you down!' Screw them. Seriously, screw them. You can quote me on that.” -- Newegg Chief Legal Officer Lee Cheng referencing patent trolls

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki