backtop


Print 65 comment(s) - last by aguilpa1.. on Feb 26 at 3:18 PM

The car will make its appearance at the Geneva motor show in March next month

Volkswagen has confirmed its XL1 hybrid for production, which will make its appearance at the Geneva motor show next month.

The two-seat Volkswagen XL1 has a plug-in diesel hybrid system that allows it to achieve 314 MPG and 31 miles on electric power alone. The CO2 emissions sits at 21 g/km, and it is considered the most aerodynamic car with a Cd figure of 0.189. It's also very light at just 1,752 pounds.


The XL1 hybrid features a 47 bhp 0.8-litre, two-cylinder diesel engine with a 27 bhp electric motor and 5.5 kWh battery pack. According to VW, the XL1 can go from 0-62 MPH in 12.7 seconds with a top speed of 98 MPH.

The XL1 also has some other interesting features, such as a design that completely covers the rear wheels to reduce drag; a pair of rear-facing mirrors on the side of the car instead of door mirrors; wing doors that swivel upwards and forwards, and slightly offset seats for the most interior space possible.


As mentioned, the XL1 is very light at just 1,752 pounds because it is mainly made of carbon monocoque. Aluminum is used on the suspension and dampers as well as ceramic for the brakes and magnesium wheels.

A price has not been confirmed yet, but some reports say the XL1 could cost as much as £70,000 ($107,000 USD). The car will make its appearance at the Geneva motor show in March next month.

Source: Autocar



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By theapparition on 2/21/2013 12:59:40 PM , Rating: 2
To add another point, I love how these mega MPG claims completely neglect the cost of electricity, which is how they are achieving such high numbers.

In theory with no inefficiency, a typical designed sedan, with Cd around .3 and normal frontal area, could only achieve ~140mpg @ 60mph under typical sea level atmospheric conditions. That's it. There's X amount of energy in 1 gallon of gasoline and it takes X amount of energy to move that car against the wind resistance and rolling resistance of tires at that speed. That's also assuming you can convert 100% of gasoline's energy into motion, which right now runs closer to 20-25%. So using the engine and driveline inefficiency, we are closer to 30-40mpg highway as a theoretical top limit for a typical sedan. In reality, car's today aren't that far off.

This is simplified, and of course ignores weight that affects rolling resistance, and the additional energy required to overcome changes in momentum (eg, stop and go, City MPG). A gallon of Diesel contains more energy, and hence would boost those calculations slightly.

To improve this, you need to lower the Coefficient of drag (Cd), significantly reduce the cross sectional area, improve the tires (but improved rolling resistance means less traction.....not quite a good tradeoff) and of course improve engine efficiency. Or go the hybrid route which stores energy in another form.

You can't create energy out of the blue, but you can store it for later use. In this case, the electric batteries. But that doesn't come for free, so it needs to be calculated and provided in these MPG Equivalent claims.


By wordsworm on 2/21/2013 1:57:23 PM , Rating: 2
The VW 1l wasn't hybrid at all, but achieved similar results.

I hope they find a way to make this car under 40k. There's something incredible about being able to take a trip across Canada on $50-60 worth of fuel.


By Jeffk464 on 2/21/2013 11:28:25 PM , Rating: 2
My understanding is the electricity cost for running an electric car is extremely cheap. The money is all tied up in battery packs.


"If they're going to pirate somebody, we want it to be us rather than somebody else." -- Microsoft Business Group President Jeff Raikes

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki