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The car will make its appearance at the Geneva motor show in March next month

Volkswagen has confirmed its XL1 hybrid for production, which will make its appearance at the Geneva motor show next month.

The two-seat Volkswagen XL1 has a plug-in diesel hybrid system that allows it to achieve 314 MPG and 31 miles on electric power alone. The CO2 emissions sits at 21 g/km, and it is considered the most aerodynamic car with a Cd figure of 0.189. It's also very light at just 1,752 pounds.


The XL1 hybrid features a 47 bhp 0.8-litre, two-cylinder diesel engine with a 27 bhp electric motor and 5.5 kWh battery pack. According to VW, the XL1 can go from 0-62 MPH in 12.7 seconds with a top speed of 98 MPH.

The XL1 also has some other interesting features, such as a design that completely covers the rear wheels to reduce drag; a pair of rear-facing mirrors on the side of the car instead of door mirrors; wing doors that swivel upwards and forwards, and slightly offset seats for the most interior space possible.


As mentioned, the XL1 is very light at just 1,752 pounds because it is mainly made of carbon monocoque. Aluminum is used on the suspension and dampers as well as ceramic for the brakes and magnesium wheels.

A price has not been confirmed yet, but some reports say the XL1 could cost as much as £70,000 ($107,000 USD). The car will make its appearance at the Geneva motor show in March next month.

Source: Autocar



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314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By alpha754293 on 2/21/2013 11:40:24 AM , Rating: 2
314 mpg might be overstating it a little (probably mpg-Imp.) and that's probably the combined mpg-e-Imp. at that). But still, anything north of 100 mpg-US would be welcomed!




RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By ppardee on 2/21/2013 12:26:15 PM , Rating: 3
Even if it isn't overstated, it's not really as big a deal as most people think as far as the pocketbook (who has a pocketbook anymore? Is that what you'd call a small Kindle today?) is concerned.

A car getting 10mpg would burn 10 gallons in 100 miles, yes?

A car getting 50 mpg would burn 2 gallons in 100 miles. Yeah! Saved 8 gallons!

A car getting 100 mpg would burn 1 gallon in 100 miles... Only saved 1 gallon??

A care getting 300 mpg would burn .33 gallons in 100 miles... tripled the gas mileage and only saved 0.66 gallons.

If you drive the car 100k miles in its lifetime, going from 50 mpg to 300 mpg will save you about $6500 (assuming around $4/gal) That's not chump change, but it won't offset the price difference between this (ugly) car and a Prius.


RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By bug77 on 2/21/2013 12:47:22 PM , Rating: 5
That's why I like the European way of measuring consumption better. This VW actually uses 1l/100Km.


RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By Mint on 2/21/2013 1:06:18 PM , Rating: 1
True, but on the other hand the European MPG tests are much less representative of the real world. A car marketed as 60MPG+ in Europe will get 35MPG combined with the EPA test in the US.


RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By Argon18 on 2/21/2013 3:55:22 PM , Rating: 3
I'd argue the opposite, that the US EPA tests are not representative of real world consumption, while the EU tests are. Modern diesels in particular, get much better real-world numbers than what the EPA sticker states.

The fact is, that Europe "gets" diesels, and understands that they must be tested differently - both in terms of emissions, and fuel economy - from gasoline cars, if you are to obtain accurate numbers.


RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By Spuke on 2/21/2013 6:27:57 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Modern diesels in particular, get much better real-world numbers than what the EPA sticker states.
And what numbers are those? Most of the numbers I've seen for VW diesels in particular are right at rated hwy. How is that better? Also, most auto publications state that the EU's testing methods are NOT anywhere near real world. Most politely say they're optimistic at best.


By Strunf on 2/22/2013 8:00:40 AM , Rating: 2
hmm I get exactly the rated "mpg" VW states for my car, the thing is people drive differently and that counts a lot on your "mpg" performance.


By JPForums on 2/25/2013 10:18:27 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
The fact is, that Europe "gets" diesels, and understands that they must be tested differently - both in terms of emissions, and fuel economy - from gasoline cars, if you are to obtain accurate numbers.
Perhaps you can explain then. I figured the best way of testing, regardless of fuel type, is to model the way drivers drive in the real world as best as you can. Then record the distance traveled and the fuel consumed (you could also record emissions). Then it becomes a simple calculation to get the rate consumption/emission. You need different models depending on the area as driving patterns are different depending on location, but the accuracy of the test is directly related to how accurately the model represents the area in question. Fuel type, at best, has an indirect influence that would be captured directly by a good model.


By bug77 on 2/21/2013 5:13:18 PM , Rating: 2
I was strictly speaking about the measurement unit, not about _how_ it's measured.


By Dr. Kenneth Noisewater on 2/21/2013 7:09:10 PM , Rating: 2
Are those US gallons or Imperial gallons?


By alpha754293 on 2/22/2013 4:16:50 PM , Rating: 2
Like I said in my original comment, it's probably mpg-Imp. Even if it were, that would probably still mean that the fuel economy in mpg-US would be something like 261 mpg.

And also like I said in my original comment, ANYTHING over 100 mpg-US would be greatly appreciated!


RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By theapparition on 2/21/2013 12:59:40 PM , Rating: 2
To add another point, I love how these mega MPG claims completely neglect the cost of electricity, which is how they are achieving such high numbers.

In theory with no inefficiency, a typical designed sedan, with Cd around .3 and normal frontal area, could only achieve ~140mpg @ 60mph under typical sea level atmospheric conditions. That's it. There's X amount of energy in 1 gallon of gasoline and it takes X amount of energy to move that car against the wind resistance and rolling resistance of tires at that speed. That's also assuming you can convert 100% of gasoline's energy into motion, which right now runs closer to 20-25%. So using the engine and driveline inefficiency, we are closer to 30-40mpg highway as a theoretical top limit for a typical sedan. In reality, car's today aren't that far off.

This is simplified, and of course ignores weight that affects rolling resistance, and the additional energy required to overcome changes in momentum (eg, stop and go, City MPG). A gallon of Diesel contains more energy, and hence would boost those calculations slightly.

To improve this, you need to lower the Coefficient of drag (Cd), significantly reduce the cross sectional area, improve the tires (but improved rolling resistance means less traction.....not quite a good tradeoff) and of course improve engine efficiency. Or go the hybrid route which stores energy in another form.

You can't create energy out of the blue, but you can store it for later use. In this case, the electric batteries. But that doesn't come for free, so it needs to be calculated and provided in these MPG Equivalent claims.


By wordsworm on 2/21/2013 1:57:23 PM , Rating: 2
The VW 1l wasn't hybrid at all, but achieved similar results.

I hope they find a way to make this car under 40k. There's something incredible about being able to take a trip across Canada on $50-60 worth of fuel.


By Jeffk464 on 2/21/2013 11:28:25 PM , Rating: 2
My understanding is the electricity cost for running an electric car is extremely cheap. The money is all tied up in battery packs.


RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By Solandri on 2/21/2013 2:45:43 PM , Rating: 3
Was gonna post that. Thank you for making the point.
quote:
If you drive the car 100k miles in its lifetime, going from 50 mpg to 300 mpg will save you about $6500 (assuming around $4/gal)

More relevant for comparison:

- Going from a SUV which gets 14 mpg to a 25 mpg sedan will save you about $12,600.
- Going from a 25 mpg sedan to a 50 mpg hybrid will save you about $8000.
- Should be obvious from the above, but going from a 14 mpg SUV to a 50 mpg hybrid will save you about $20,600.


RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By Spuke on 2/21/2013 3:07:59 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
- Going from a SUV which gets 14 mpg to a 25 mpg sedan will save you about $12,600.
What SUV gets 14 mpg?


RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By twhittet on 2/21/2013 4:05:58 PM , Rating: 2
Chevy Suburban for one (no, I'm not going to bother listing all the years it's rated for 14mpg or less).

I'm sure there are plenty of others out there that get that - especially real world mpg vs EPA.


RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By Spuke on 2/21/2013 6:38:36 PM , Rating: 2
I see it gets 15/21. That's not 14 and the 15 is city only mpg. I had inlaws with these and they all averaged 16 mpg in regular driving (meaning a mix of hwy and city). Also, why did you pick the Suburban? There aren't exactly a lot of these being sold and they're no where near what people buy when purchasing a SUV. It would make more sense to pick the CR-V or the Explorer as those sell in MUCH greater numbers, #11 and #16 respectively, than any other SUV.


By Souka on 2/22/2013 11:55:18 AM , Rating: 2
My wife has a Acura MDX and gets 17MPG avg
I had a Subaru Forester and got 20MPG avg

I now have a used Prius ($6k, 35k on the odo...friend of family deal). I'm averaging 47MPG.

But I did give up a bad weather capable car...but saving $1200+ year in gas is well worth it. I'll call a cab if/when needed.


By Masospaghetti on 2/22/2013 9:18:59 AM , Rating: 2
14 MPG was pretty typical of a full size V8 SUV from the previous decade...most of which are still driving around.

Toyota Sequoia is like 13/17 IIRC
Even Explorer V8's were 12/17 - 13/19


By djcameron on 2/21/2013 9:16:59 PM , Rating: 2
The Prius is ugly too.


RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By alpha754293 on 2/22/2013 4:09:06 PM , Rating: 3
who the hell drives 100k miles in the lifetime of the vehicle?

Granny going shopping and church?

And if that's the case, WHY would you be buying a $100k car that can do 300 mpg for that purpose?

(The premise of your argument is invalid; therefore, your argument is invalid.)

100k miles, I do that in like two years. Average/nominal.

Right now, I get an actual combined of around 27 mpg or so (+/- 2 mpg). Even IF it were ONLY rated at 270 mpg-US, that'd still be a 10 TIMES increase.

50000 miles / 27 miles/gallon = 1852 gallons
1852 gallon * $4/gal = $7407 per year.

50000 miles / 270 miles/gallon = 185.2 gallons
185.2 gallon * $4/gal = $740.74

Cost difference = $740.74-$7407 = $6666.67/year.

If I keep the car for ten years, I would have saved $66,666.67 over its lifetime.

How is it not a big deal? OBVIOUSLY if you're looking at getting a car like this, you're either trying to be green, or you just drive a lot.


By JPForums on 2/25/2013 10:04:56 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
100k miles, I do that in like two years. Average/nominal.
quote:
Cost difference = $740.74-$7407 = $6666.67/year
quote:
If I keep the car for ten years, I would have saved $66,666.67 over its lifetime.
What car do you drive? I'd love to get my hands on a car that will last 500K miles without negating the savings in completely rebuilding it. Doing so while putting on 50,000 miles per year is very impressive. Certainly I can see large diesels putting over 1M miles on with few problems, but I'm apparently looking at the wrong sedans as my expectations are significantly lower. I would not expect a hybrid with a greater number of moving parts (points of failure) and ultra light construction to hold up nearly that many miles.
quote:
who the hell drives 100k miles in the lifetime of the vehicle?
There are a lot of people in the U.S. that like to trade in their vehicles at arbitrary mileage (100K is probably a popular value) whether it has problems or not. It's not like Europe where people often drive the car into the grave. They're also a lot less consistent with their car maintenance in the U.S. than in Europe.


By testerguy on 2/24/2013 12:14:06 PM , Rating: 2
Firstly, mpg isn't just a measure of cost. It's more importantly a measure of efficiency - which is directly related to environmental impact. People who buy this car will be doing so mainly for that reason, above anything else.

These cars are not marketed as saving you money overall, they are marketed as reducing emissions.

Also, theoretically ranges of cars can be higher if mpg increases (not always, but can do).

Also - natural resources like oil are diminishing so you shouldn't expect the prices to remain that low.


RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By Trisped on 2/21/2013 2:15:28 PM , Rating: 3
If you go to the source linked at the bottom of the article (http://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/geneva-motor-sho... ) it states:
quote:
The XL1 can travel for 31 miles just on battery power alone and has a claimed range of 310 miles on diesel and battery power combined, despite having a tiny 10-litre fuel tank.

Rough calculations suggest that the XL1 is capable of a real-world 127mpg in ideal conditions, a product of the car’s 795kg kerb weight, its very slippery body and wind-cheating and low resistance narrow tyres on magnesium wheels, which measure just 115/80 at the front and 145/55 at the rear. A guide to the XL1’s efficiency is that VW claims it requires just 8.3bhp to be able to maintain a steady 62mph cruise.
So we are looking at a 127 MPG, the 314 number quoted in the article is probably the maximum driving range when fully fueled (full battery, full diesel tank).


RE: 314 mpg might be overstating it a little
By Spuke on 2/21/2013 3:07:53 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
So we are looking at a 127 MPG, the 314 number quoted in the article is probably the maximum driving range when fully fueled (full battery, full diesel tank).
At what speed and in what conditions?


By SilthDraeth on 2/23/2013 10:53:54 PM , Rating: 2
Rough calculations suggest that the XL1 is capable of a real-world 127mpg in ideal conditions , a product of the car’s 795kg kerb weight, its very slippery body and wind-cheating and low resistance narrow tyres on magnesium wheels, which measure just 115/80 at the front and 145/55 at the rear. A guide to the XL1’s efficiency is that VW claims it requires just 8.3bhp to be able to maintain a steady 62mph cruise .


By alpha754293 on 2/22/2013 4:11:36 PM , Rating: 2
*edit*

Sorry. I originally make the assumption that this is a PHEV. Whoops. My bad. So it's not MPG-e-Imp. But still, it's pretty damn good.


By Florinator on 2/25/2013 11:16:25 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
But still, anything north of 100 mpg-US would be welcomed!


Not at a price tag of over $100k, it wouldn't... For $100k you can have a Tesla Roadster, which beats the VW both in looks and performance...


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