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New device to be unveiled in New York City

If you're a fan of Samsung's Galaxy smartphones, you will be glad to hear the latest rumor making the rounds. Sources are indicating that Samsung is set to announce its next high-end smartphone called the Galaxy S IV on March 14. The mid-March introduction date was unveiled started with a tweet from Eldar Murtazin.

Murtazin wrote, "Save the date for a big announcement - March 14 :) And keep silence ;) HTC will miss HTC One sales again :( Like it was in 2012."

The Verge backs up that tweet, stating that March 14 is "definitely" the day that Samsung will be unveiling its latest generation flagship smartphone.

Another interesting tidbit that comes from the sources claiming to be familiar with Samsung's plans is that the manufacturer will focus on features rather than raw specifications.

The sources said, "The leap in cool new features from [Galaxy S III] to the next flagship will be bigger." That would seemingly mean that the leap and features would be bigger between the S III and S IV that it was between the S II and the S III.

Source: The Verge



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By Solandri on 2/20/2013 2:55:14 PM , Rating: 4
I suspect Apple does some color calibration based on samples of the screen hardware they use in their phones, but it's not per device. This is a redux of the Mac vs PC in the 1990s. Apple made an attempt to color calibrate their computers and displays. PC makers did not. That's why Macs captured such a large share of the professional graphics and artists community.

In the 2000s, color profiling and color calibration started to become affordable making this a moot issue. Colorimeters are now in the $100-$200 range. Even if your equipment comes pre-profiled, there's often significant improvement from doing your own custom color profile. So even Mac owners doing professional graphics work own a colorimeter.

Which brings us to phones. Color accuracy should not be an issue on phones. It's a problem which was solved over a decade ago on PCs. Android and iOS simply need to add support for color profiles, and the phone stores need to have a $150 colorimeter. If you're unhappy with the color accuracy of your phone, the store could then generate a new profile, load it, and your phone's colors are now accurate. If the color of the screen shifts with age (as I suspect AMOLED does), then you just take it back to the store for a new profile every 6-12 months.

The only reason it's not being done is that the vast majority of phone buyers simply don't care. The only people who care are a handful of graphics professionals, and legions of fanboys looking for anything to argue about.


By TakinYourPoints on 2/21/2013 3:43:21 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Color accuracy should not be an issue on phones. It's a problem which was solved over a decade ago on PCs.


The thing is that they are pretty consistent between devices without user calibration, close enough at least. I've seen several myself and Anandtech's analysis corroborates it.

SRGB gamut and gamma charts are below: http://www.anandtech.com/show/6330/the-iphone-5-re...
http://www.anandtech.com/show/6472/ipad-4-late-201...

http://www.displaymate.com/iPad_ShootOut_1.htm#Tab...

The iPad 3/4 in particular is nearly reference quality out of the factory, something that is remarkable for a $500 consumer product. We've started using them at work for quick color passes on images when we're in the field. Very convenient and completely unexpected.

Getting this level of color calibration from other manufacturers would be great but HTC seems to be the only other company interested in making their screens look good.


"Google fired a shot heard 'round the world, and now a second American company has answered the call to defend the rights of the Chinese people." -- Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.)

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