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Microsoft adds about $20 to single license Office for Mac software

When it comes to pricing and licensing of Office software these days, Microsoft certainly isn’t making any new friends. If you are a Mac user that relies on Office software for business or school, you will be paying more for the next upgrade you purchase.
 
Microsoft has raised the price of Office for the Mac by as much as 17% and has stopped selling multi-license bundles for the productivity suite. The price change puts Office for Mac 2011 on the same pricing schedule as Office 2013 for Windows, despite the fact that it is much older software.

Microsoft hopes that the move will push Mac users to adopt its subscription Office 365 offering.


Under the new pricing schedule, a single-license of Office for Mac Home & Student has jumped from $120 to $140, while Office for Mac Home & Business has been bumped from $200 to $220. Microsoft previously offered Mac users a Home & Student bundle with three licenses for $150 and a Home & Business two-license bundle for $250, which have now been discontinued.

If you need multiple licenses, the new pricing means a significantly larger expense than in previous years. By contrast, Office 365 Home Premium will cost about $100 per year or $10 per month for a single household license covering up to five computers. Office 365 Small Business Premium costs $150 per year per user and allows that one user to install the application on up to five devices that they own.

It's worth noting that if you want a new version of Office for Mac computers, some retailers are still offering the software at the previous prices. However, both Microsoft and Apple are now charging the higher prices.

Source: Computerworld



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By sigmatau on 2/19/2013 7:33:43 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Is it somehow infringing on your ability to get something accomplished?


Absolutely! You really have to ask this question?

Apple affects many people directly and indirectly (I'm talking only about those that do not buy Apple crap.)

1. Apple was able to restrict HTC phones and reduce functionality of other phones because they were able to use our broken patent system to lie and claim intellectual property that is not theirs.

2. Some phone makers have to remove functionality after you bought their phone! It's usualy not a major function and usualy is some eye candy, but have you ever heard of any other company throwing temper tantrums like Apple so that something as minor as a bounce back affect when reaching the end of a web pages is removed?

3. Cars. Most car makers have some stupid iphone/ipod connection that enables certain functionality that cannot be accessed without an iphone/ipod. Really? So basically, to satisfy the 10-20% with iphones, the other 80-90% have to suffer with an inferior stereo? Total BS! Aftermarket is the better way to go, but sometimes you don't want to go through the trouble.

4. eBooks. I probably should have started with this one. When was the last time a new entry into a developed/developing market gets to set and raise all prices including the prices of their competitors? This is beyond crazy to me. Anyone that defends this specifically is also crazy to me. Apple almost got away with raising all ebook prices by 30%. Even those of their competitors!

These are just a few off the top of my head. This is why I hate Apple. And as a former iphone 3GS owner and one that was forced to use the epic fail software called iTunes, I talk from experience too.

Choice? Where? Not if Apple is one of those choices. Once Apple is removed from the list of choices, we will have a real freedom to choose what we want.


"When an individual makes a copy of a song for himself, I suppose we can say he stole a song." -- Sony BMG attorney Jennifer Pariser














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