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Most of the fired employees come from the hardware (Steam Box) and mobile divisions

Prepping for the launch of its upcoming Steam Box and expansion onto multiple mobile platforms, gaming giant Valve Corp. is making some major changes to its staff, including firing a number of employees.  The software firm -- which became famous for its Half-Life series, its Source engine, and its Steam game distribution network -- has fired at least 25 employees, according to Gamasutra.  At least eight employees disappeared from a publicly available staff registry, seemingly partially confirming the news.

The casualties include Jeri Ellsworth, a hardware engineer responsible for prototyping the Steam Box controllers, and Jason Holtman, who helped architect the STEAM service and handle developer relations.

The bulk of the cuts appear to be in the hardware and mobile (Android) divisions.  While ostensibly the Steam Box is still on track for a release sometime next year, the cuts raise question about whether Valve is second-guessing the leap into the hardware space.

Gordon from Half Life
Valve is thinning the herd.

Firings are very unusual at Valve.

The Seattle-area company is famous for its outside-the-box management strategy.  There are no bosses, no employee at the company has an official title, and there are no cubicles -- employees migrate their desks around the building to wherever they're working each week in organic fashion.

In the past, most employees who didn't work out left on their own terms without being fired.  Gabe Newell -- who The NYT says is at times referred to as the "CEO" of the company, but only by empty formality -- comments, "I get freaked out any time one person leaves.  It seems like a bug in the system."

Valve employs a little over 300 employees, reportedly, so the cuts may represent as much as 8 percent of the total workforce.  Valve employees told Gamasutra that the company is making "big decisions" and referred to the uncharacteristic firing as "the great cleansing".

Sources: Gamasutra, Develop



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By NellyFromMA on 2/15/2013 2:22:07 PM , Rating: 2
Like I said, a couple of phenominal games and a couple of small good ones.

Half-life phenominal. Left 4 Dead good enough hardly phenominal (you know, you have to earn that in my book). Counterstrike, a small good game with a cult following. I played CS for a LONG time when it was new and when it wasn't anymore and while it was fun, it was never phenominal.

Saying Left 4 dead and CS are phenominal and in the same class as Halflife just isn't true to me. It's an opinion and you're entitled to yours for sure as I am mine.

Are Left 4 Dead and CS good games, even great? Depends who you are. L4D is good IMO, CS is great FOR WHAT IT WAS, which was a small little mod. Thats what Valve does.

Little mods become slightly bigger stand alone games. They do this way more often than release blockbusters like Half life, forwhich only that series stands out as phenominal to me.

Hopefully I've made my points more clear, but I suspect people (not you necessarily) are just repulsed by opinions that differ from their own 'facts'.


RE: Well someone's gotta pay for the whale to eat..
By Piiman on 2/16/2013 8:18:35 AM , Rating: 2
Your point is only your opinion and what YOU thought of their games.
My opinion of their games is totally different than your, go figure.

In short your opinion of their games is not nessarily what the masses think. (nor or mine for that matter)


By TakinYourPoints on 2/17/2013 11:30:47 PM , Rating: 2
All this and rarely ever a mention of DOTA 2 around these parts.

Bunch of casuals all up in here. ;)


"I modded down, down, down, and the flames went higher." -- Sven Olsen











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