backtop


Print 14 comment(s) - last by Alexvrb.. on Feb 17 at 2:11 AM

The WD TV Play is available now

Western Digital announced a new media player today called "WD TV Play," which allows users to stream content from network-connected devices to an HDTV.

WD TV Play is a Wi-Fi enabled media player that lets users stream movies, TV shows, Internet videos and music through apps like Netflix, Hulu Plus, YouTube, Pandora, Spotify, SlingPlayer and VUDU. It has Full-HD 1080p support as well as social apps like Facebook.

In addition to these streaming options, users can also experience media they already own like pictures, music and videos. But this pre-owned content must be on a computer or network storage that has a Digital Living Network Alliance server. Connected digital cameras, camcorders or USB drives can air content on the HDTV, too.


“We are excited to bring popular Internet channels and the ability to play personal media from other connected devices in the home, to budget-minded customers,” said Scott Vouri, general manager for WD's connected life solutions group. “Those features and our new, easy-to-use interface make WD TV Play a product that brings smart-TV benefits to a wide range of people.”

There's a WD TV Remote as well, which is connected over the home wireless network and has pre-programmed buttons for easy app navigation. Users also have the option to use their iPhone, iPad, iPod touch or Android device as a remote with the WD TV Remote app.

The new WD TV Play is now available for $69.99.

Source: Western Digital



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Amazon Prime?
By Alexvrb on 2/17/2013 2:11:04 AM , Rating: 2
That's still a good option for many people. You can do the same thing for Xbox too, I used to use TVersity years ago. But transcoding requires two boxes. You're decoding, re-encoding, and decoding again (constantly). It's not very efficient, and it partially ties up the other machine (wouldn't want to transcode and game online at the same time myself) - not a good option for all households. Also depending on the source and how it is handled, quality can diminish slightly (if done right it is virtually unnoticeable).

Anyway, my point is that the best playback device, that can handle everything, is a PC. You can slap together something cheap with an APU and get damn good results if you use the right software. If you use a lowend sub-75 watt dGPU, even better. But not necessary IMO unless you're driving a fancy home theater setup.

Obviously it's more money than a Roku or similar, but as you pointed out these little boxes have their limitations, and very poor amounts of storage. So everything must be streamed over the internet, streamed from another local device, or additional storage must be attached. I think anyone that is serious about do-anything playback device that can handle any format (without any outside help) should consider building a budget PC.


"If you can find a PS3 anywhere in North America that's been on shelves for more than five minutes, I'll give you 1,200 bucks for it." -- SCEA President Jack Tretton














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki