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Fragmentation may need users wondering who should be patching their Android devices

Android fragmentation has been a significant problem for Android smartphone users, smartphone makers, and developers for a long time. Hardware capabilities of Android devices vary widely and not all smartphone manufacturers are willing to give older smartphones upgrades to the latest versions of Android OS (hoping instead that customers will simply buy a new smartphone).

Security researchers are now saying that the rampant fragmentation in the Android market could leave users vulnerable to attacks. According to the researchers, one of the major problems is that it remains unclear who is responsible for patching the Android operating system on smartphones on the market.
 
The question is should Google, the smartphone maker, or the wireless carrier be offering fixes for security issues. Google often moves quickly to patch security problems, but carriers and smartphone makers that use a customized operating system may drag their feet or simply not offer the fix at all.

This fact, according to security experts, means that the Android operating system leaves users more vulnerable to hackers, scam artists, and malware than competing operating systems.

“You have potentially millions of Androids making their way into the work space, accessing confidential documents,” said Christopher Soghoian, a former Federal Trade Commission technology expert who now works for the American Civil Liberties Union. “It’s like a really dry forest, and it’s just waiting for a match.”

The researchers say that if a major malware outbreak for Android devices surfaces, the system for updating smartphones using Android could dramatically slow efforts to protect information carried on the devices.

Source: Washington Post



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By retrospooty on 2/8/2013 10:14:52 AM , Rating: 1
Ya, its kind of a trend here... Other than the the occational "idiot" decribed above, for the most part, our elderly users have iPhones and the younger ones have Androids.

LOL "This is NOT your fathers smartphone".


By retrospooty on 2/8/2013 3:34:45 PM , Rating: 2
Signifying nothing...

More than 1/2 of those Android sales are super cheap low end phones that arent being sold to people like us here at AT/DT. If you are the type of person that needs corp. email and just occasional internet, why would you buy a high end phone like iPhone or GS3? Its a result of the platforms flexibility. If there were low end iPhones you would see the same thing. In fact if there were low end iPhones, they would probably hold the majority of marketshare... But there arent and they dont.


By KoolAidMan1 on 2/8/2013 5:28:14 PM , Rating: 2
Its because most Android phones are low end. Even among the high end the GS3 is in the minority. I don't know how else to reconcile how it has half the usage statistics of the much newer iPhone 5 or just a fraction of the 4S.

GS3 users use the internet and apps the same way an iPhone user would, there are just much fewer of them out there.


By nikon133 on 2/10/2013 3:21:40 PM , Rating: 1
Here's a possible scenario.

Android users know that computers still exist, and use them regularly - when PC is available and better device for the job, which is almost whenever PC is available.

iOS users were brainwashed with late SJ's "post-PC" mantra and, as such, try to use their iOS devices for everything, including stuff those devices cannot do, or do poorly. As a result, they spend much more time trying to achieve something.


By GotThumbs on 2/8/2013 10:06:25 AM , Rating: 2
Security is not just about APPS, but your phones settings and data sharing. Again, self education is the key.

I would like to see a way to bypass the carriers install and go vanilla Android. While older phones would not be a snappy on the latest OS, I would like the choice.

Best wishes on your choices,


By retrospooty on 2/8/2013 10:07:54 AM , Rating: 1
"I would like to see a way to bypass the carriers install and go vanilla Android"

Done... Cyanogenmod!

http://get.cm/


By retrospooty on 2/8/2013 10:08:48 AM , Rating: 2
I menat to add... I have been running CM10.1 (Android 4.2.1) on my GS3 for several weeks now. Its absolutely brilliant.


By retrospooty on 2/8/2013 10:09:59 AM , Rating: 3
I "menat" to type better too.


By Rukkian on 2/8/2013 1:21:24 PM , Rating: 2
AOKP 4.2.1 on my GNEX, and love it.


By Spuke on 2/8/2013 2:29:16 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
AOKP 4.2.1 on my GNEX, and love it.
Is that the Samsung GNEX? I'd love to upgrade mine if it is. Not sure why it hasn't been pushed OTA.


By Rukkian on 2/11/2013 5:07:28 PM , Rating: 2
That is correct, I have the verizon Galaxy Nexus, and while it is slightly annoying that Verizon has gotten in the middle of the updates, I have been on aokp for almost a year now, and it has pretty much always been rock solid, with some very nice added features.


By Spuke on 2/8/2013 2:27:48 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I menat to add... I have been running CM10.1 (Android 4.2.1) on my GS3 for several weeks now. Its absolutely brilliant.
Damn, didn't know there was a JB ROM for that. Works great huh?


By retrospooty on 2/8/2013 2:43:35 PM , Rating: 2
Oh yeah. They had CM10 (Android 4.1) for months and months now. CM10.1 (Android 4.2.1) has been out for well over a month for the GS3. They are usually right on top of things with every high end phone. Anyhow, get it, its great, and no Samsung bloatware in the way. They have nightly builds and monthly stable releases.

Go here... http://get.cm/

The GS3's are listed below. Find the right carrier model and get the latest "M Snapshot" (the monthly stable release)

d2att
d2cri
d2mtr
d2spr
d2tmo
d2usc
d2vzw


By Spuke on 2/8/2013 5:50:48 PM , Rating: 2
Thanks much!!!


By bug77 on 2/8/2013 10:29:10 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Here's a thought.... Think


You have lost most readers right there.


By someguy123 on 2/10/2013 3:39:12 AM , Rating: 3
It's weird seeing a dailytech article being less biased than the comments section.

Google put itself in a position (probably to win over manufacturers initially) where they cannot properly distribute security updates due to an OEM wall. This isn't about the protection of walled in gardens vs open systems as much as its about the poor foresight and OEM laziness/bad business practices. Being "smart" about apps is an entirely different story as this is just about general software updates.


By KoolAidMan1 on 2/10/2013 4:38:50 PM , Rating: 2
Mick didn't write the article, that's probably why.

Otherwise nothing will change the comment section, not while the Android defense force is there to spin their usual excuses. It's like seeing a Yaris user group defending their third rate cars.

You're right, Google's lack of control is the biggest thing holding back the platform right now. There is no accountability for updates and no active security updates. Carriers have little reason to support older phones when they have new and upcoming ones to sell. Someone here posted about their carrier taking a year to update to 4.0, after JB got released.

Hacking your locked bootloader and installing your own ROM is an option for your average nerd, but it isn't for normal people. OEMs and carriers either need to take better care of their customers or hand control over to Google.


That is always the case... and the choice
By retrospooty on 2/8/2013 9:33:59 AM , Rating: 3
The "Walled garden" approach like Apple gives them more control and better security, but very much limits options.

The "open" approach gives flexibility, but is more difficult for developers and more open to attacks. It just depends on what you want.

Funny thing here. Even Wozniak thinks Apple has lost its lead with regards to tech and OS

http://www.theverge.com/2013/2/7/3963962/steve-woz...




RE: That is always the case... and the choice
By quiksilvr on 2/8/2013 9:53:56 AM , Rating: 2
Blame the cellphone makers, not Android. They can easily upgrade to the latest and most secure OS. Hell, if the Nexus S, a single core 1GHz phone with 256MB of RAM can have Jellybean, why cant the millions of other entry level phones HTC, Samsung, Motorola, Huwaei, etc. that have the same specs? Hell, even mulitple dual-core CPU phones with more ram are left with ICS.


RE: That is always the case... and the choice
By retrospooty on 2/8/2013 10:00:06 AM , Rating: 2
I know, carriers too. But they arent interested in upgrading old devices, they need to sell new ones. Apple has one phone per year to make a ROM for and other makers have dozens if not several dozen each. Thus the walled gardens benefit.

Dont get me wrong, I use Android and love it. Apple's current offering is not up to par with its competition. I agree with Woz... In fact, I have been saying that since Jelly Bean was released last summer. Android has alot of strengths, but the best security isnt one of them. Fortunately for me, I dont care about security, I care about having the best mobile experience, and that is currently Android, by a long shot.


By KoolAidMan1 on 2/9/2013 4:32:33 AM , Rating: 2
The article reads like less about praise for Android and more about praise for Samsung.

He also still uses an iPhone and says that Windows Phone has a UI that "beat Android's by a wide margin". Can't say I disagree.


Really?
By bug77 on 2/8/2013 10:27:01 AM , Rating: 1
Windows isn't fragmented and it's targeted by most malware precisely because it's a huge, guaranteed target. So researchers can just stfu, we know they can claim just about anything.




RE: Really?
By elleehswon on 2/8/2013 10:47:32 AM , Rating: 2
really? do you realize how many millions of windows machines are still running variants of windows 3.1? windows 95, 97,98, ME and XP(i think xp went out of support this year)? none of which are supported by Microsoft for security updates?

how's that for fragmentation?


RE: Really?
By bug77 on 2/8/2013 11:23:34 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
do you realize how many millions of windows machines are still running variants of windows 3.1?


No, I don't: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usage_share_of_operat...

If you want to call WinXP and Win7 "fragmentation", I won't stop you.


RE: Really?
By Reclaimer77 on 2/8/2013 9:11:33 PM , Rating: 1
Yeah well Windows is pretty "fragmented" right now, that's for damn sure. We have Windows 7 and it's 4 or 5 different versions. Windows 8, same thing. Then we have Windows 8 "RT".

They all run the same basic code (just like Android), but have varying levels of features, security, etc etc.

Still doesn't stop it from being the best desktop OS out there for most people.


RE: Really?
By KoolAidMan1 on 2/9/2013 4:56:35 AM , Rating: 2
Different versions of Windows 7 or 8 don't create fragmentation in a way that affects the ability to run applications or effect security from the outside. The differences between XP, Vista, and 7 don't mean much for running applications either, backwards compatibility is one of Windows' cornerstones.

Fragmentation is very different with Android. It launched in a half-baked state and continues to rapidly improve. The new JB added security and UI smoothness that was basically catch-up with iOS and Windows Phone.

The differences between 2.x and 4.x are massive, much deeper than the differences between Windows XP and 7.


I got an iPhone 5 recently
By KiwiTT on 2/8/2013 2:54:38 PM , Rating: 3
It is my first smartphone. The fragmentation issue, google, maker, carrier, etc. meant I will end up with an unsupported device in less than 18 months if I chose Android. Not good when I generally buy expensive technology for the long haul.




By KoolAidMan1 on 2/9/2013 11:04:24 PM , Rating: 2
You're also getting better third party support, smoother UI, and better hardware components (processor and display) with the iPhone.

If you want more flexibility with homescreen, settings, and hardware then there's Android. Lack of support can be bypassed by unlocking the bootloader and installing ROMs yourself. It's all about what your priorities are. I'm on WP right now, it's in this in-between area that is closer to the iPhone.


Nexus 7
By bupkus on 2/8/2013 10:12:07 AM , Rating: 2
Which is why I only use a stripped down version of Android...

Then again I still have an hp Touchpad w/ CM9. I wonder if that's as much fragmented as it is hp-mented.




RE: Nexus 7
By retrospooty on 2/8/2013 10:13:24 AM , Rating: 2
How is CM9 running on the touchpad? Smooth and stable yet? I know they had issues, just becasue there were never proper drivers made for its guts.

I have one that my wife uses, but still using WebOS.


I wish Google controlled updates.
By Mr Perfect on 2/8/2013 12:47:41 PM , Rating: 2
Personally, I wish Google controlled updates. Want to know why the market is fragmented? Check this out:

1. Google released Android 4.0 on December 16, 2011.
2. HTC promised to have 4.0 released for my model of phone by August of 2012(A leaked build from about that time shows they did in fact create it).
3. On Feburary 5th 2013 Verizon finally pushes the 4.0 update out over the air.
4. In the interim, Google has release two more major versions of Android. You can bet your sweat ass this phone will never see either of them.

My phone has been updated to 4.0 and running nicely since Verizon released the update. I'm enjoying the new features and haven't noticed any bugs or performance problems so far, so the hardware seems capable.

My next pone will be a Google Nexus device, the manufacturers and carriers are just getting in the way.




By Spuke on 2/8/2013 2:36:24 PM , Rating: 1
CM that shit dude!


Nothing but a paid ad
By Trisped on 2/8/2013 7:40:47 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Google often moves quickly to patch security problems, but carriers and smartphone makers that use a customized operating system may drag their feet or simply not offer the fix at all.
They saw the same problem with Windows 7 phones. Microsoft would release a patch which fixed bugs, brought new features, and increased security, but the carriers would not spend the time to approve it.

Personally I think the whole system needs to be reviewed. There are some areas where the manufacturer or the carrier might need to review changes, but in most cases these are just basic OS updates designed to increase security and usability.




Android FTW
By Daemia on 2/10/2013 12:29:35 PM , Rating: 2
Android fragmentation is becoming a thing of the past. The 5 of users using JB is increasing as we speak. Malware is rampant in Android cause that's were the mobile users are at.
Haaa even here Android wins lol..
I guess iOS cease to exist..




iOS issues
By Daemia on 2/10/2013 9:13:45 PM , Rating: 2
!!!!!
By CristinaGibbs22 on 2/9/2013 9:30:04 PM , Rating: 1
up to I looked at the check ov $5706, I accept that my friend could realy bringing in money in there spare time on their apple labtop.. there neighbour had bean doing this 4 only 14 months and at present cleared the depts on there cottage and purchased a great Land Rover Range Rover. this is where I went, Great60.comTAKE A LOOK




A marriage made in hell
By Tony Swash on 2/8/13, Rating: -1
RE: A marriage made in hell
By retrospooty on 2/8/2013 11:11:49 AM , Rating: 2
Or... You could say that the worlds most popular and widely used mobile platform has the same issues as the the worlds most popular and widely used desktop platform. Its part of being on top, you are a target. Its like saying the US gets more terrorist threats than Peru does. Of course it does.


RE: A marriage made in hell
By KoolAidMan1 on 2/8/2013 7:38:11 PM , Rating: 2
Uncurated app sources are the main reason. iOS has malware too, but almost all of it comes from sideloading apps that didn't go through the app store. If you can install anything then a third party can give you malware.

iOS has the biggest active mobile userbase in terms of internet and app downloads, it is a massive target. Blocking malware through a central channel is how there is less of it.


RE: A marriage made in hell
By petrosy on 2/10/2013 7:39:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
iOS has the biggest active mobile userbase in terms of internet and app downloads, it is a massive target. Blocking malware through a central channel is how there is less of it.


By that logic.. America has the largest country population when measured by girth


RE: A marriage made in hell
By jimbojimbo on 2/8/2013 11:58:15 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
most insecure mobile OS embraces the world's most insecure desktop OS

You do realize with Windows 7 it's been extremely secure. In fact people believe their Macs to be immune but it's far less secure than a standard Windows 7 machine. Did you type this in 2008? Their commenting board must be trying to catch up or something.


RE: A marriage made in hell
By Tony Swash on 2/8/13, Rating: -1
RE: A marriage made in hell
By retrospooty on 2/8/2013 12:48:24 PM , Rating: 4
Nice spin... Years of practice I guess ;)


apple not fragmented????
By luv2liv on 2/8/13, Rating: -1
RE: apple not fragmented????
By JackBurton on 2/8/2013 9:52:25 AM , Rating: 4
Seriously? iOS 6 is compatible will ALL iPhone's with the exception of the first and second gen iPhone's. The 3GS (3rd gen) is compatible, but with limited features.

So let's put that in perspective, the latest iOS is compatible with ALL iPhone's except the 2007 and 2009 versions. Are you seriously calling that "fragmented?" Now compare that to Android where even a year old phone may still be not even have the latest OS available to them.

So yeah, that's why they don't mention iPhone "fragmentation." Because that is not an issue with iPhone's. One of the benefits of a closed system.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By JackBurton on 2/8/2013 9:54:24 AM , Rating: 2
Correction: Second gen iPhone was released in 2008.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By RufusM on 2/8/2013 1:38:53 PM , Rating: 3
Any OS is insecure if you're installing sketchy apps on it or visiting sketchy websites.

Rule #1 of computing and life in general: Don't be stupid.

They have all have their share of vulnerabilities. OS updates that patch vulnerabilities help, but that also doesn't mean everyone and their brother is infected either.

This is a solution looking for a problem and the ubiquitous "security researchers" looking to sell anti-virus solutions to mobile users have a massive incentive to keep this conversation going.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By FaaR on 2/8/2013 7:16:49 PM , Rating: 2
This is a complete fallacy. You CAN'T stay safe with an internet connected device by practising the equivalent of "safe sex". There's just tons of drive-by exploits that will take control of your device through what you believe is a harmless ad banner on a legitimate website, or heck, just by being connected. Port-scan exploits are also very common.

You NEED to stay updated with security fixes, and have a (good) virus and malware scanner installed to be reasonably safe. Anything less is just asking to get hit by something nasty; usually with you not even realizing you've got it, because you have no software installed to alert you to the fact you've been compromised.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By CZroe on 2/8/2013 1:42:50 PM , Rating: 2
Technically, only the first-gen ones don't have iOS6 because the iPhone and iPhone 3G were essentially the same phone/generation. The iPhone 3G had a new 3G radio/baseband with GPS but the CPU, GPU, memory, display, and all frequencies were identical. Look at the hardware names: original iPhone is iPhone1,1 while iPhone 3G is iPhone1,2 and iPhone 3GS is iPhone2,1.

That said, Apple arbitrarily distinguished the two and needlessly further fragmented things when they refused to give the original iPhone iOS4 but happily handed it over to iPhone 3G. Even before that, they refused to enable iOS3's A2DP Bluetooth audio playback on the original iPhone claiming that it wouldn't work without more work that they weren't going to do because the hardware was different, which was a bald-faced lie. "A2DP Enabler" for jailbroken iPhones did exactly what it sounds like: Simply enabled playback. It didn't write the software support for the hardware that Apple refused to do, it simple enabled what Apple had disabled and it simply worked.

Just like Android devices, let's not forget that the iOS ecosystem is more than just phones though. There are several more abandoned iOS devices from the iPod to the iPad.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 2/8/2013 9:58:20 AM , Rating: 2
On the flip-side, the first gen iPad was released in 2010 and didn't get iOS 6.

I'm still scratching my head on that one.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By EnzoFX on 2/8/2013 2:22:10 PM , Rating: 2
It's because of the iPad 1's small amount of ram unfortunately.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 2/8/2013 9:56:24 AM , Rating: 4
Well, the 3GS came out in 2009 and it got iOS 6. How many other 3.5-year-old smartphones are out there that are still getting major OS updates?

It's neutered all to hell with regards to major iOS 6 features (compared to the 4S and 5), but it at least is compatible with iOS 6 applications and has the latest security updates.

http://arstechnica.com/apple/2012/09/tempting-fate...


RE: apple not fragmented????
By Reclaimer77 on 2/8/13, Rating: 0
RE: apple not fragmented????
By retrospooty on 2/8/13, Rating: -1
RE: apple not fragmented????
By Tony Swash on 2/8/13, Rating: -1
RE: apple not fragmented????
By retrospooty on 2/8/2013 11:08:30 AM , Rating: 2
LOL... I cant blame him for that. If I got rich 30 years ago, I would work hard either. I would do nothing but play all day.

His opinion is still valid, its the same thing I have been saying for months, so have many others. The iPhone is lagging behind the competition. Put simply, you can do more with almost any other high end phone on the market. There are alot of missing featuresm and IOS is stagnating, while Android, WP8 and BB10 are improving. If Apple doesnt do something to catch up, sales will start to be effected.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By drycrust3 on 2/8/2013 3:02:06 PM , Rating: 1
Just because a person doesn't do things that gain world wide attention doesn't mean those things aren't important. In some ways developing an internationally known (but now totally obsolete) computer in one's youth is far less important than having well behaved children.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 2/8/2013 10:16:49 AM , Rating: 2
I don't disagree with you on stagnation and the UI looking the exact same since 2007. It's pathetic.

But the article was talking about keeping users protected from security vulnerabilities and getting timely updates. The 3GS is over three years old and still receiving regular updates.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By Reclaimer77 on 2/8/2013 10:24:55 AM , Rating: 2
"Security" is a non-issue on smartphones in my opinion. Just a straw man argument really. I mean what percentage of these devices even get infected with something? Like 1%, if that?

And, you know, Apple hasn't exactly had the best track record with pushing critical updates. They've been known to let stuff slide for weeks/months.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By jimbojimbo on 2/8/2013 11:12:22 AM , Rating: 2
That's a good thing... for the jailbreakers out there.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By djdjohnson on 2/8/2013 12:49:49 PM , Rating: 2
Somewhere along the line I read that Android phones have over a 30% infection rate. I wish I could find the source on that, though.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By Rukkian on 2/8/2013 1:18:52 PM , Rating: 2
I would love to see that documentation. The only people that should be able to be infected are those that allow installs from untrusted sources, and then go to infected locations. Most people have no clue how to even do that if they are stupid enough to get infected.

I am not really careful on my rooted phone, have lookout av, but it have never even found 1 issue in 1.5 years I have owned the phone.

I could see 30% of idiots that root their phone and say yes to any prompt, and allow installs from untrusted sources, and go to sites hosting .apk files. The thing is, that probably accounts for about .0001% of android phones out there.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By KoolAidMan1 on 2/8/2013 5:21:32 PM , Rating: 1
Malware gets into Google Play. Their automated filters let 20% of malware slide through. One came through a few days ago that pushes a Trojan onto your PC, and it also uses the microphone to record you and push that recording to the attacker.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By Rukkian on 2/11/2013 5:17:47 PM , Rating: 2
Got a link to this? I would love to see it. I am not saying I don't believe you, but I highly doubt it is legit, and not from IphoneRulez.com. Or from some nigerian prince trying to help you with your phone.

While there are probably a few minor bugs that get through Google Play filters (happens to Apple to), what you are suggesting sounds pretty fishy to me.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By Reclaimer77 on 2/8/2013 7:07:46 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Somewhere along the line I read that Android phones have over a 30% infection rate. I wish I could find the source on that, though.


Well that just sounds absurd of course. I would like to see that "source", because it can't even be possible for such a high number of devices to be infected.

Data shows most people just use their phones to text, make calls, and light browsing. There's just NO WAY you would get an infection doing that.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By FaaR on 2/8/2013 7:29:55 PM , Rating: 5
About 40% of android phones infected in china and russia: http://www.eweek.com/security/android-malware-rise...

...So yeah, it's possible.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By Reclaimer77 on 2/9/2013 9:07:20 AM , Rating: 2
Not relevant. Even if that data is correct, the massive gap between those markets and the US/European market tell me the OS isn't at fault.

Basically you have people in poor countries choosing to willingly install from third party untrustworthy app markets to get out of paying for apps. Has nothing to do with Android.

quote:
"in North America, less than 0.3 percent of users have had a malicious program installed on their phones, according to a recent report by network security firm Kindsight."


This is all that matters.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By retrospooty on 2/9/2013 5:12:09 PM , Rating: 2
exactly, at the company I work at we support over 300 phones, about 50/50 Android and iPhone. We have never once seen a single case of malware on either platform.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By messele on 2/10/2013 7:42:46 AM , Rating: 2
So your own limited experiences are all that matters? Let's see if you hold the same opinion when the billion phone cheapo Android Chinese botnet is inevitably activated at some point in the future because it was "somebody elses problem".

By this point Google will be firmly in bed with the Chinese, or at least they will be under the mistaken impression that they are.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By retrospooty on 2/10/2013 8:13:58 AM , Rating: 2
"So your own limited experiences are all that matters?"

Reading comprehension... No, My own experience managing 100's of Android and iPhones matches the stats posted above. "in North America, less than 0.3 percent of users have had a malicious program installed on their phones"

My point is anyone saying its a huge issue is exaggerating. 3 of 1000 Android users in the US have malware. End of story.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By Reclaimer77 on 2/10/2013 9:32:37 AM , Rating: 2
How does it feel to wake up every day and be a complete moron?

quote:
Let's see if you hold the same opinion when the billion phone cheapo Android Chinese botnet is inevitably activated at some point in the future because it was "somebody elses problem".


Uhhh IS there an Android botnet? I think you just made that up.

quote:
By this point Google will be firmly in bed with the Chinese


Who in the hell ISN'T in bed with the Chinese today? You know where every single i-Device is made right? And where all the parts for the i-Devices come from, right? I'll give you one guess.

I took a crap this morning that made more sense then you.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By CaedenV on 2/8/2013 11:55:19 AM , Rating: 2
Apple is also not fragmented in the same way that Android is. All iPhones use Apples software from the ground up. On Android you may have 100 phones that use the same kernel, but then everything else from the bundled packages, to the UI can be from the phone manufacturer, or even your carrier. Personally I have my dobuts about the ability for HTC or Verizon to be able to write secure code for their devices. Even Sammy, who is a bit better than the rest, is probably not as good at writing software as Google is.
On top of that fragmentation, when there are updates then they go out to specific phones. You phone may get it 'quickly' meaning 2-3 months, or someone may drag their feet and you will get it a year out, or you may not get it at all. These updates often patch issues, and so not getting these patches can leave you open to attack.
So yes, apple does have 'fragmentation', but you are talking about 2 flavors of the OS, and the current OS runs on all 'current' devices that could possibly still be under contract or warranty. That is not the kind of fragmentation that causes concern. The release of products which already come with an outdated version of the OS, bundled with a UI from one company, and a buggy integrated software bundle from another company, and the inability to get 'up to date' software in a timely fashion is what causes concern.

When it comes down to it Google needs to take a bit more control over the platform and implement some form of unification at least on the revision level where everyone running v4 can get at least low level updates that plug holes without worry about it affecting the software packages of other vendors. But then again Google is popular because they are very loose with control, and the price is not bad either. I am not sure that Android would have the same level of popularity among manufacturers if they were to lock things down. I know that WP isnt exactly the most manufacturer friendly company out there (and certainly no Android replacement), but they do offer much less fragmentation, and they also provide a fair amount of Apple Lawsuit protection as well.


RE: apple not fragmented????
By Samus on 2/8/2013 12:34:30 PM , Rating: 4
Have you guys seriously tried running IOS6 on the 3GS? Even IOS5 completely ruined the phone...the performance hit is ridiculous. Multitasking restrictions and other disabled features (things that worked in IOS4.x) I think are intentional to force people to upgrade to a newer phone. After all, Apple will let you UPGRADE IOS versions, but never go back...


RE: apple not fragmented????
By av911 on 2/8/2013 2:20:11 PM , Rating: 3
I experience lag even on an iPhone 4 (iOS 6).


RE: apple not fragmented????
By DanaGoyette on 2/9/2013 5:37:08 PM , Rating: 2
I have an iPod Touch 4G sitting in a closet, because it doesn't have enough memory to actually run iOS5 properly.
It regularly idles with only 8 or so megabytes of memory free. (Good luck writing forum posts on a browser that UNLOADS the page when you switch tabs to copy a link.)

My "Usage logs" are full of page upon page of OutOfMemory failures.

Safari also crashed all the time -- and sometimes takes more than one try to get it to STOP crashing on open. My record: 14 crashes on open, within approximately 1 minute, before it finally stayed open on the 15th try.

Browsing... Crash. Open... crash. Open... crash. Open... crash. Open... crash. Open... crash. Open... crash. Open... crash. Open... crash. Open... crash. Open... crash. Open... crash. Open... crash. Open... crash. Open... crash. Open... oh hey, it stayed open this time!
(I seem to recalling it crash again 5 minutes later.)

My response to the Android fragmentation: if the un-upgraded phones get exploited where there's a fix available, the manufacturers and carriers should be legally liable for any damage.


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