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Print 6 comment(s) - last by deltaend.. on Mar 1 at 10:35 AM

The US tech industry is recovering from the down economy, and spending is increasing

The US economy clearly isn’t out of the woods quite yet, but the technology industry is rebounding nicely as consumer electronics sales, enterprise spending, and IT investments are on the rise.

As the tech industry recovers from the down economy, there are new job opportunities opening up – and a growing need for new computers, servers, and IT services.  The current economic recovery process has proven to be more forgiving, with the tech sector improving from 4.4 percent unemployment in Q1 2011 down to only 3.3 percent in Q4 2012.
 
Companies tend to have a love-hate relationship with the IT world, as a constantly evolving tech market can be sometimes difficult to navigate.  Internal corporate IT departments are often underfunded and over worked, while executives also can be hesitant to recruit a third-party IT firm to lend a hand.
 
During the dot-com boom, companies seemingly weren’t able to hire workers fast enough – until the market crashed, leaving everyone from C-level executives all the way to administrative assistants unemployed.  Since that time, there have been a number of technological breakthroughs, and the success carriers over to today’s generation of product and service development.
 
The adoption of cloud computing and mobile technology has drastically complicated the computer landscape, with cost, stability issues and security problems critical for proper day-to-day operations.

Here is what Dan Sanguinetti, President of IT specialist firm PC Professional, said in a statement:
 
“The IT industry has transformed the delivery of applications to the business community through the use of cloud computing.  The concerns uncovered by the IT community include the need to contain IT costs, better control the migration to new versions of software, and provide access from an assortment of devices – it has ushered in the use of the cloud to improve productivity.  Cloud offerings have helped evolve services to a world of increased reliance of remote access to patch file servers, remote access problems with the workstations, tablets or smartphones, along with the migration of data for backup and offsite storage.”
 
As companies continue to evolve their business strategies, it’s interesting to note IT departments are now better suited to offer robust data disaster recovery programs.  The addition of cloud computing adds a unique twist, making the technology look extremely appealing, but there are plenty of potential issues that will need to be addressed in the near future.
 
It’s a brave new digital age out there, and it should be quite a ride…

Sources: FierceMobileIT, PC Professional, Data Center Journal



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RE: Confusing
By deltaend on 3/1/2013 10:35:55 AM , Rating: 2
I completely agree. I am a multi-faceted IT guy and during the “recession” we had unparalleled growth as other less streamlined companies lost their clients due to over-pricing and low quality of work and we filled in the gap. We have now been in business for 10 years and I couldn’t ever remember a time where we were just a _______ shop or someone who worked here was only a specialist in ___________. That kind of thinking in juvenile and hardly worthy of someone who calls themselves an IT guy. The idea that you can learn one skill and then coast on that one skill to a tune of $80k/year for the rest of your life is pathetic. You go find any nurse or doctor who only knows how to do one thing, or one lawyer who only understands one type of law. We aren’t the only field that has needed to adapt and become more worthy of the money we are making and I for one am glad that we have gone through such a pruning. Perhaps people will think twice before trying to break into the IT field just because it seems easy and only actually do it if they truly enjoy the work and the unending personal educational process that goes with it.


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