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Strategy Analytics found that Apple shipped about 17.7 million phones for the fourth quarter

A new report from Strategy Analytics shows that Apple was the No. 1 phone vendor in the U.S. for Q4 2012.

According to the report, which was conducted by Strategy Analytics' Wireless Device Strategies service, Apple became the No. 1 mobile phone vendor for the first time in the fourth quarter of 2012. It grabbed about 34 percent of the market in that three-month period.

Strategy Analytics found that Apple shipped about 17.7 million phones for the fourth quarter, which was a healthy increase from 12.8 million shipped and 25 percent of the market share in Q4 2011.


The report noted that Samsung, the hardware maker for many popular Android smartphones, was nipping at Apple's heels with 16.8 million mobile phone shipments in the fourth quarter, giving it 32 percent of the market share. This was a nice 5 percent jump for Samsung from Q4 2011.

LG landed in third place with about 4.7 million phone shipments and 9 percent of the market share in Q4.

Mobile phone shipments overall grew 4 percent for the quarter compared to Q4 2011, jumping from 50.2 million to 52 million in the U.S.

Source: Strategy Analytics



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By TakinYourPoints on 2/3/2013 2:57:28 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
It's about what we get as consumers, not what the companies get.


But those things directly affect consumers. I use desktop operating systems with lots of developers making a broad range of applications. Its the same with my phones and tablets.

As a consumer I use platforms with excellent hardware and broad third party support. They always happen to be ones that are profitable while being easy to develop for. What I as a consumer get is the direct result of what developers benefit from, and iOS continues to lead in areas of power usage and profitability by a wide margin. Their users on average use and demand more, and developers are there to fill that demand.

Remember what Ballmer said, "Developers Developers Developers!!!". Developers make or break any platform. All of those things like ease of development and distribution and usage and profitability trickle down to the end-user experience.

So of course it is important.

And if you don't use applications on tablets or phones, that's cool too. If you do less with your hardware then there are other platforms out there. Android is incredibly versatile and it covers everything from the GS3 to a crappy phone for your grandmother.

A cheap/free Android device that doesn't do much has been perfect for hundreds of millions of people. It isn't a type product I'm interested in, and it doesn't incentivize development like a higher percentage of "real" smartphones would, but I don't fault anyone for not needing much out of their devices either. Hell, there are millions who barely use their desktop computers. Not everyone is a power user and that's totally fine.

Cheers.


RE: Tony 's happy, Mototroll weeps and cries
By Reclaimer77 on 2/3/2013 5:12:52 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Remember what Ballmer said, "Developers Developers Developers!!!".


LMAO yeah and what the fuck does Ballmer know about running a successful mobile platform again? All he knows about developers is that they rejected Windows Phone 7. He had to pay them to even look at Windows Phone 7.5. And they're dragging ass on Windows 8.


By TakinYourPoints on 2/6/2013 3:25:12 AM , Rating: 2
Herpty derp, again you miss the point!

Developers made Windows, just as they've made iOS. Whether or not he succeeded in getting them to WP is completely beside the point, the point is that developers totally matter.


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