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The back-up plan is in case regulators find issues with lithium batteries after the 787 troubles

In the wake of Boeing's 787 Dreamliner issues, Airbus said it's prepared to redesign or utilize alternatives to its A350 lithium-ion jet batteries.

Airbus expects to use lithium-ion batteries much like those used in the 787 Dreamliner, but with recent battery fires occurring in the 787 jets, Airbus is ready to make any necessary changes that authorities may require.

Airbus has addressed that fires could be a potential threat when using lithium-ion batteries, but feels safe with its designs enough to continue with efforts to use them.

"We identified this fragility at the start of development and we think we resolved it about a year ago," said Fabrice Bregier, Airbus CEO. "Nothing prevents us from going back to a classical plan that we have been studying in parallel.


"We have a robust design. If this design has to evolve, we have the time to do that. If it has to change in a more drastic way because the authorities reach the conclusion that the technology is not mature, then we have all the time we need to do this on the A350 before first delivery in the second half of 2014."

The 787's lack of fire-fighting system has been the subject of inspection over the last week, but Airbus declined to offer any details regarding the A350's fire-fighting system or on the battery's design overall.

Throughout January 2013, 787 Dreamliner jets through Japanese airlines All Nippon Airways (ANA) and Japan Airlines (JAL) had various issues concerning the lithium-ion batteries. The 787s were grounded in the U.S., Japan and India while an investigation began.

Source: Reuters



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RE: Airbus better than Boeing ?
By US56 on 2/3/2013 8:53:47 PM , Rating: 2
Presumably you are referring to Wernher von Braun. The claim that Americans have never acknowledged the contribution of von Braun, Rudolph, and many other German engineers and managers who contributed to the U.S. space program is patently ridiculous. The truth is very much the opposite. It is also a fact that neither the F-1 nor J-2 engines, the prime movers of the Saturn V, were personally designed by von Braun. He was in charge of the overall design of the Saturn series of heavy lift vehicles. He did take a personal interest in the design of the engines because that was the most critical element of the program with the possible exception of the inertial guidance system. The F-1 and J-2 engines were designed by very capable teams of engineers and managers at Rocketdyne whose work was overseen by similarly capable teams of engineers, managers, and administrators at NASA. How things have changed. Sorry to say, the U.S. could not repeat the feat of landing a human on another celestial body today despite all the computer aided engineering tools. It's not because engineers today are not capable. It's a lack of national motivation. We really have the former Soviet Union to thank for super-motivating the U.S. space program at the time.


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