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  (Source: buzzom.com)
Games played a major part in the increased revenue for both parties

Game apps for iOS pummeled Android game apps when it came to revenue for the fourth quarter, but Android is growing quickly.

According to App Annie's Index, iOS games earned 3.5 times the revenue of Android games in Q4 2012. The iOS App Store increased its overall revenue by 20 percent from Q3 to Q4 2012 while the Google Play store doubled its app revenue in the same time period. However, iOS still raked in more cash.

The top revenue makers for iOS (ordered from 1-10 on the top 10 list) included apps by Electronic Arts (EA), Supercell, Gameloft, GREE, Inc., HungHo Online Entertainment, Zynga, Kabam, NHN Corp., SQUARE ENIX and Rovio Entertainment.

For the Google Play store, game companies occupied nine out of the top 10 list for best revenue-making apps. NHN Corp. held the No. 1 spot.

The top five countries contributing to iOS app revenue were the U.S., Japan, the UK, Australia and Canada. For the Google Play store, the top three were Japan, the U.S. and South Korea.




Source: Games Industry



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By Tony Swash on 1/31/2013 6:39:27 PM , Rating: 0
quote:
I don't know if you noticed, but I asked about "platform parity


Sorry I thought the connection would be self evident but I was wrong.

A platform, in the sense that the word is used about computing devices, is something upon which other things are built. Those things are almost all commercial undertaking being carried out for profit, so the function of a platform is to support an ecosystem of commercial activities (hardware and software sales, the selling of digital content such as music and movies, advertising, etc, etc).

In the PC days a unit of platform, a Wintel PC or a Mac, were basically the same as far as acting as a platform went. People did more or less the same things on a Wintel PC or a Mac. This meant that measuring how many Wintel PCs there were compared to how many Macs there were was a very useful way of assessing or measuring the overall commercial health of the ecosystem of each platform. If ten times as many Wintel PCs as Macs were sold you could be confident that the commercial ecosystem of Wintel PCs would be several times that of a Macs. This would attract investment, developers, peripheral makers, distributors, etc, etc to the Wintel PC platform because that was where the bulk of the money was and so the Wintel PCs got even better and more attractive and a feedback loop was created.

So in the PC days market share was a great metric for measuring the commercial health of a platform and hence its prospects.

Because of the evoidence I have covered and linked to in other posts in this thread it is apparent that the mobile device market is not at all like the PC market in that people do not appear to be using their mobile devices the same way on different platforms. To simplify a bit, but not much, iOS user actually use their platform to do things that generate revenue flows, and thus do things which support commercial activity, significantly more than do Android users. Per capita iOS supports much more commerce than Android does per capita.

That means that market share is no longer the golden metric it was in the days of the PC. That means a platform can have a majority market share and still be less successful as a platform for supporting commercial activity and conversely a platform can have a smaller market share and be a much better platform for commercial activity. The money longer follows market share, it follows market share multiplied by platform usage.

This means that in order to work out what is going on in the mobile device markets and ecosystems one has to go way beyond simple market share and look at a whole range of other platform performance metrics. This is interesting I think.


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