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  (Source: slashgear.com)
The business versions of the new Office will launch February 27

Microsoft released Office 365 today as a subscription, cloud-based service that costs only a little over $8 per month.

Office 365 Home Premium costs $99.99 per year and features Word, Excel, Outlook, Access and Publisher. It also comes with 20GB of cloud storage in SkyDrive and 60 minutes of worldwide calling through Skype per month.

This version works with up to five desktops, tablets and laptops, and will receive automatic updates since it's cloud-based.

“Today’s launch of Office 365 Home Premium marks the next big step in Microsoft’s transformation to a devices and services business,” said Steve Ballmer, CEO of Microsoft. “This is so much more than just another release of Office. This is Office reinvented as a consumer cloud service with all the full-featured Office applications people know and love, together with impressive new cloud and social benefits.”

Microsoft also launched a few other versions of Office today, including Office 365 University, which is $79.99 for four years and up to two PCs or Macs, and offers all the same features as Office 365 Home Premium; Office Home and Student 2013, which is $139.99 for one PC and offers Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote without any Office 365 extras; Office Home and Business 2013, which is $219.99 for one PC and offers the same features as Office Home and Student 2013 (but includes Outlook), and Office Professional 2013, which is $399.99 for one PC that offers the same features as Office Home and Business 2013 but with Access and Publisher.

The business versions of the new Office will launch February 27.

Source: Microsoft



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um... what?
By talikarni on 1/30/2013 6:26:11 PM , Rating: 2
I don't blame them for wanting to create a system like this, but most businesses and companies with their internal email systems already have several Terabytes worth of storage. I foresee this Office 365 being a massive flop unless they greatly increase the storage amount.

I go through 20GB worth of email alone per 2 months with my work... plus another 50GB+ per year in scheduling and other office documents.

No way I would pay anything for online storage like that when I can have my own local storage by getting a 2TB hard drive for around $100 and keep it for as long as I want.

and really Open Office and Libre Office have almost all the same features minus email, but Thunderbird is great for that and much more expansive than MSOffice Outlook email...




RE: um... what?
By ShieTar on 1/31/2013 7:37:15 AM , Rating: 2
Everything strongly depends on what you are trying to do.

In my line of business, building satellites with international teams of 1000+ people involved, there is no need for hughe eMail-Space. 6 years on my current project have only generated about 3GB of overall eMail data, about 5k mails. The real volume of data is shared through a configuration controled database, because we do not want to loose to much information whenever somebody in the overall team quits, retires or dies.

On the other hand, we would never put our confidential information on a cloud, so I am sure this is aiming more at home and small business users. If you operate a 5-people-shop selling fake moustaches online, 20GB of eMail should last you a few years.

As far as Open Office goes, that again depends on what you need to do. In my personal experience as a scientist and now engineer, Write can do everything I need to do about as good as Word. Impress is actually a little better than PowerPoint due to its capability to handle TeX-Style formula editing. Calc on the other hand fails rather horribly as an Excel-Replacement once you need advanced features like matrix manipulations or computational macros. Also some things which are not available in either tool, like good interpolation of data, is more easily found as a user-created extension for excel than for calc.

And Thunderbird is not a full replacement for Outlook with all its calender-related functionality without a significant amount of extensions. So I think you can make Thunderbird do everything that Outlook does at any given moment, but you are not guaranteed to still have a fully functional system after the next Thunderbird update comes in; some extensions may stop working correctly. Most companies with more than a dozen people will not risk that, since the cost of an MS Office license is equivalent to the cost of only two or three hours of lost work for most tech-jobs.


RE: um... what?
By Da W on 1/31/2013 9:40:14 AM , Rating: 2
This is perfect for small buisness in my view. I can work on my big fat 3-screens desktop at home and when i leave to meet customers i have access to everything on my surface or even phone.
There's a market for it. But i agree, Microsoft is no longer the only name in town.


RE: um... what?
By Wererat on 1/31/2013 12:41:42 PM , Rating: 2
Any company with a bunch of stuff to store had better have a better system than "everyone just save to their local disk."

Shared server raw storage is a very rudimentary step.

MS offers Sharepoint for version and access control, collaboration, workflow processes, and publication. They don't intend businesses will use 20Gb to store their whole company's data. 20Gb is good enough for "those files I need to have with me on my desk, laptop, tablet and/or phone at a moment's notice."


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