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Project at transmission plant will be completed this year

Japanese automaker Honda Motor Comp., Ltd. (TYO:7267) is outfitting its Russell's Point, Ohio transmissions plant with a fancy new pair of "utility-scale" wind turbines.

Exactly how big is "utility-scale"?  The new turbines will tower 260 feet in the air and come equipped with 160 feet (97 m) blades.  The installation, integrated by Juhl Energy Inc. (PINK:JUHL), will likely use Suzlon Energy, Ltd.'s (BOM:532667) largest turbine package, the S97.  Capable of producing 2.1 megawatts of power, the turbine is ideally suited for slower wind speeds.  The lower rotation speed also reduces risk to airborne wildlife.

The turbines are expected to pump out 10 percent of the total electricity the plant needs to operate.

Honda has pledged to cut its products' CO2 emissions by 30 percent by 2020 and promised "significant" cuts at its plants, as well.  While Juhl has suffered some financial setbacks in recent years, it does have a lot of experience in the industry, having supervised over 237 megawatts of wind energy deployment.

Suzlon S97
The Suzlon S97

The plant in Russell's Point makes transmissions for most Honda vehicles manufactured at plants in the U.S.  Cars.com ranked the 2013 Honda Accord, produced at the company's nearby Marysville, Ohio plant, the third "Most American" car on the market (as ranked by number of domestically manufactured parts).

Ford Motor Comp. (F) and Volkswagen AG (ETR:VOWhave announced solar power installation projects at their U.S. manufacturing plants.

Source: Juhl Wind



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Battery Synergy for Car Makers
By Shig on 1/29/2013 7:02:51 PM , Rating: 2
Electrified cars' batteries are only under warranty for so long and only hold a certain charge for so long until they are no longer suitable for automotive applications. However after their useful automotive life they can still be incredibly effective in utility grid applications, i.e. storing renewable energy. Typically a battery that's been 'used up' by a car will still have around 40-50% of it's capacity left.

A few of the major car makers have already done demonstration projects, Nissan and GM I believe.




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