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Print 18 comment(s) - last by Mint.. on Jan 21 at 11:35 AM

Nokia now has a 3-D printing development kit for the Lumia 820

One of the most promising technologies that has developed (and been cost reduced) over the last several years in the tech word has to be 3-D printing. 3-D printing allows manufacturers to quickly prototype products using varying materials, and Nokia is now talking about its efforts in the field with the Lumia 820 3-D printing community project.

The key to the 3-D printing community project has to do with the creation and release of the number of 3-D templates, case specifications, recommended materials, and best practices. The idea is to allow the community to 3-D print their own shell for Lumia 820 smartphone. The removable shell of the phone is one of the most interesting design features of this Windows Phone 8 device.

Nokia says that it is offering the required files and documents for 3-D printing your own shell for the smartphone as the 3-D printing Development Kit or 3DK.

Nokia Community & Developer Marketing Manager John Kneeland said of 3-D printing, "In the future, I envision wildly more modular and customizable phones. Perhaps in addition to our own beautifully-designed phones, we could sell some kind of phone template, and entrepreneurs the world over could build a local business on building phones precisely tailored to the needs of his or her local community. You want a waterproof, glow-in-the-dark phone with a bottle-opener and a solar charger? Someone can build it for you—or you can print it yourself!"

Being able to 3-D printed custom cases for Nokia smartphones is an interesting feature. While most consumers don't have access to a 3-D printer (although Staples is looking to change this), the Nokia 3DK does open the door for 3-D printing companies to start producing all sorts of interesting accessories for the Lumia 820

Source: Nokia



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Nokia lumia 820 new shape and 920 no amoled
By DarkUltra on 1/18/2013 9:23:20 AM , Rating: 0
I kinda miss the oval shape of the lumia 800, and the AMOLED+ screen on the lumia 900. The Lumia 820 feels cheap and a bit loose, I think it would be much better if they only fixed some bugs and increased the battery.

The Lumia 920 does not longer have a amoled display so its background does not blend with the rest of the screen. This was so beautiful on the 800 and 900, especially with the ClearBlack tech.

I have a few issues with my Lumia 800 (battery life, compass, auto brightness ++) but I won't upgrade this time around. I had hope Nokia would do more like Apple, to only do improvements to this great phone that are truly better and not take one step forward, then one step back.




RE: Nokia lumia 820 new shape and 920 no amoled
By arthur449 on 1/18/2013 9:32:35 AM , Rating: 4
quote:
... more like like Apple, to only do improvements ...
Let's not forget that the initial retina iPad 3 was thicker and heavier than the iPad 2 that it replaced. Thickness and weight were widely advertised as key improvements to the iPad 2 when it was released.


RE: Nokia lumia 820 new shape and 920 no amoled
By jimbojimbo on 1/18/2013 11:18:51 AM , Rating: 3
In Apple's world whatever features their new product has is the best even if it got worse from previous versions just like the weight and thickness. Take the mini, they say it's the best but the pixel density is pretty horrible by today's standards yet an Apple fan, who have gone on and on about how pixel density is the most important, now say it's not so important.
It's quite sad how brainwashed people are.


By TakinYourPoints on 1/19/2013 7:15:21 AM , Rating: 4
I know loads of iDevice users who passed on the iPad mini because of pixel density. Other people don't mind the pixel density at the expense of the display, but that's their choice. I'm not a fan of the mini, but whatever. My biggest complaint with the iPad 3 is also the increase in weight over the 2. The iPad 2 feels nearly perfect in comparison, but the laws of physics prevent driving the display of a newer iPad with a lighter device for the time being.

Again, whatever, everything is all about compromises. Everyone deals with that, even people really who love a certain company's products understand tradeoffs. These are far smaller issues people accept like the failure rate of the XBox 360 (I had three replacements) or the sheer quantity of cheap/bad Android phones and tablets that some people deal with.


RE: Nokia lumia 820 new shape and 920 no amoled
By Mint on 1/19/2013 8:16:30 AM , Rating: 2
Yes, life is indeed about compromises and choice. That's why we love open ecosystems that lets manufacturers serve every niche. We can get AMOLED, a stylus, big screens, small screens with lower prices, unibody case, non-unibody with replaceable memory/battery, etc. No compromise is universally optimal.

As for poor products, why are you calling them bad Android phones instead of just bad phones? Samsung and HTC have solid customer satisfaction, and there's no need to associate their products with those of a poor manufacturer just because they're all in the Android category. I see you don't associate Apple with a low quality manufacturer just because they're both in the smartphone category.


By TakinYourPoints on 1/19/2013 9:10:45 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
As for poor products, why are you calling them bad Android phones instead of just bad phones? Samsung and HTC have solid customer satisfaction, and there's no need to associate their products with those of a poor manufacturer just because they're all in the Android category.


The huge Android marketshare that people like to brag about is almost all in low end devices. If we're talking high end then it still belongs to Apple based on the fact that an old device like the 4S outsold the GS2, GS3, and GN2 combined, over half of mobile traffic and app downloads are iOS, Google still makes more money serving ads from iOS than Android, etc etc.

If people want to keep talking about huge Android marketshare then those low end devices are completely fair to talk about in context.

quote:
Yes, life is indeed about compromises and choice. That's why we love open ecosystems that lets manufacturers serve every niche. We can get AMOLED, a stylus, big screens, small screens with lower prices, unibody case, non-unibody with replaceable memory/battery, etc. No compromise is universally optimal.


I completely agree and I've brought your points up numerous times. For other people, having the compromises that come along with better apps and developer support, faster and more optimized hardware, and great vendor support are worth it.

There's no such thing as a perfect ecosystem, just pick the best one for you. Or in my case, buy a bunch of things from different ecosystems. :)


By Mint on 1/21/2013 10:35:43 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
The huge Android marketshare that people like to brag about is almost all in low end devices.
But we're not talking about that. Nobody mentioned it but you. We were talking about features, tradeoffs, etc, and for no reason you mentioned "bad Android phones".


RE: Nokia lumia 820 new shape and 920 no amoled
By Manch on 1/18/2013 10:14:39 AM , Rating: 2
I have an 800 and yeah I love how black the screen is and how you can barely tell where the border is. I bought a 920 yesterday on contract here in Norway. Cheaper than pay as you go.

I didn't notice till I was home that the screen isn't as nice. I do like the larger screen bc its easier to type on with my gorilla paws but I did like the shape of the 800 better. It was almost seamless.

I never had any issues with my 800, and I'm not getting rid of it. It's now my work phone. Replaced my crappy dumbphone with it.


RE: Nokia lumia 820 new shape and 920 no amoled
By BZDTemp on 1/18/2013 11:21:34 AM , Rating: 1
The 920 screen is nice and I for one prefer it over AMOLED. Yes, the black is not that black but colours in pictures and video are much more real and less cartoon like.

I bet you'll find yourself won over before long.


RE: Nokia lumia 820 new shape and 920 no amoled
By Mint on 1/19/2013 8:51:59 AM , Rating: 2
AMOLED is only cartoon-like if a maker wants it to be. My Note II has options to reduce the gamut to be more accurate, if I like (and I usually choose a medium setting). CNET tested it. Looking at reviews, the Lumia 900 doesn't oversaturate.

Few people can tell if a display has a little color inaccuracy or not without a colorimeter or reference image. Cameras have that much variation anyway. Black, however, is absolute. At least 50% of the time there's something in my field of view that tells me an LCD is not reproducing black correctly. The only thing LCD is superior at is brightness, which is an insignificant factor for me since 99% of the time I won't have my AMOLED at max brightness.

So no, I'll never be won over by today's LCD tech after living with AMOLED. I'd have to get a $200 discount or a must-have feature to buy an LCD phone again. AMOLED is that good.


By TakinYourPoints on 1/19/2013 8:52:04 PM , Rating: 2
There is still a tendency to go with oversaturation and too much contrast with AMOLED, but you're right, it is the fault of the companies and not the hardware itself. Blame the bad rap on Samsung doing a terrible job with the GS3 color profiles.

Display technologies like plasma and CRT with far deeper black levels and dynamic range can display sRGB just fine with some color calibration. Apple and now HTC with the Droid DNA are the only companies doing a consistent job with their color profiles, and it all comes down to cost. According to a comment by one of the Anandtech authors (I think it was Jarred), it costs about $5 per display to calibrate properly.

That's a huge chunk of the BOM for something that isn't a material piece of hardware.


By Mint on 1/21/2013 11:35:42 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Blame the bad rap on Samsung doing a terrible job with the GS3 color profiles.
The GS3 is doing damn well in sales and AMOLED is probably the most notable difference between it and similar competitors for typical customers. Samsung is doing what the market wants.

However, you should note that outside the US, even the GS3 allows you to change the color settings to be more accurate if you don't like the eye-catching wide gamut. There's four settings: Movie, Natural, Standard, and Dynamic.

Standard is the default, Movie is the most accurate.
http://reviews.cnet.com/2300-6452_7-10014320-2.htm...
I'll take 20x the contrast over an imperceptible advantage in accuracy any day.

Also note that the GS3 was launched when the iPhone4/4S ruled the world, and it was very inaccurate and undersaturated:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/6334/iphone-5-screen...

Finally, going back to the topic at and, Darkultra misses AMOLED that he has in the Lumia 800, which, AFAIK, did not exaggerate primaries.


By Manch on 1/20/2013 2:51:41 PM , Rating: 2
I'm not saying screen is bad.Far from it. The bump in resolution and brightness is nice. I never found the colors to be cartoonish on the 800.


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