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Hiroshi Sakamoto  (Source: at7addak.com)
Sony VP mentioned an E3 announcement, but said a surprise may come in the next few months

After releasing the PlayStation 3 console just over six years ago, it looks like Sony is ready to launch its successor as early as this spring.

Hiroshi Sakamoto, Sony's vice president of home entertainment, recently gave some vague details about when we'll finally see the PlayStation 4 in an interview with Chilean site Emol. According to Sakamoto, the PS4 could make an appearance as early as May of this year.

However, Sony's VP was asked whether the new console could make an earlier entrance within the next few months.

"That's still a big secret, but our friends are preparing Sony PlayStation," said Sakamoto in the interview. "I can only say that we are focused on the E3 gaming event, scheduled for June. [An] announcement may be [made] in that minute or even earlier in May."

It is rumored that the PS 4 will have a custom chip based on AMD's A8-3850 with a quad-core 2.9GHz processor and a 1GHz graphics card with 1GB memory.

Source: CNET



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benjamin button
By Nortel on 1/16/2013 1:43:07 PM , Rating: 0
quote:
It is rumored that the PS 4 will have a custom chip based on AMD's A8-3850 with a quad-core 2.9GHz processor and a 1GHz graphics card with 1GB memory.


If one was looking to purchase a PC on a budget, I'd still recommend a system with higher specs than this. Can we really expect this console to last 6 years?

A PC with these specs could barely play Crysis... and that's a 5 year old game.




RE: benjamin button
By Pirks on 1/16/2013 1:49:36 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
that's a 5 year old game
that still has no real competition and probably won't have any in the next 5 years too (metro 2033 is the only rare exception so doesn't count)


RE: benjamin button
By OnyxNite on 1/16/2013 2:06:33 PM , Rating: 3
And why is that?
Because developers primarily target consoles and then port to the PC. So if the next gen consoles are weaker then current budget PCs then there is going to be no real advance in PC gaming tech for the foreseeable future.


RE: benjamin button
By Pirks on 1/16/2013 2:10:53 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
there is going to be no real advance in PC gaming tech for the foreseeable future
Crytek is laughing hard at you dude. Have you ever heard about something called Crysis 3?


RE: benjamin button
By OnyxNite on 1/16/2013 2:25:14 PM , Rating: 1
Last I checked Crysis 3 runs on the PS3 and Xbox 360 with their dated graphics capabilities. Ever since the first one CryEngine development has focused on bringing the features down as best they could to weaker hardware (and simplifying development) not raising the bar on graphical capabilities. Support for features that REQUIRE a directX version greater than 9.x is just tacked on at the end as an afterthought. Real advances will only come when they start developing things from the ground up to use these capabilities which means they won't be able to run on modern day consoles. Consoles are where the money is, a fact Crytek learned with Crysis, and so now they develop for the limited console specs as well.


RE: benjamin button
By Nortel on 1/16/2013 2:30:58 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
Last I checked Crysis 3 runs on the PS3 and Xbox 360


Take a look at comparison screenshots of PC running "high quality" vs PS3/Xbox. They cut down on the quality substantially, and I mean substantially .


RE: benjamin button
By OnyxNite on 1/16/2013 2:45:28 PM , Rating: 3
But the core graphics pipeline remains DirectX 9. There was a substantial changes in the core capabilities between DX 9 and 10 alone which modern consoles are unable to handle. Crysis 3 is still fundamentally a DirectX 9 game with optional more modern DirectX enhancements. Sure those enhancements can make a substantial visual difference but the game is still fundamentally a DirectX 9 game. I'd really like to eventually see DirectX 11+ games get made but if consoles don't push the boundries developers are going to keep targeting older versions because consoles are where the money is.


RE: benjamin button
By geekman1024 on 1/16/2013 9:40:04 PM , Rating: 5
fundamentally, this is a fundamental comment on fundamentality.


RE: benjamin button
By maugrimtr on 1/17/2013 11:32:00 AM , Rating: 2
When I read those rumoured specs I almost fainted.

But seriously, this is below-budget PC territory - about to be advertised and marketed as the greatest advance in Human history. Worse, people will buy into it and spend a small fortune buying overpriced games. Launch price for the PS3 was $500 I think...


RE: benjamin button
By Pirks on 1/17/2013 11:43:10 AM , Rating: 3
Yeah, people pay quite a lot for convenience and comfort, Apple has proven it a long ago.


RE: benjamin button
By SPOOFE on 1/16/2013 2:36:23 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
here is going to be no real advance in PC gaming tech for the foreseeable future.

PC graphics tech. We've had more than enough computational horsepower to make amazing games for decades now. T3h Gr@f1xXx W@nk needs to end.


RE: benjamin button
By OnyxNite on 1/16/2013 2:59:48 PM , Rating: 2
Well heck then, why even release new consoles. If we've had enough computational horsepower to make amazing games for decades now then why even bother with the PS3 let alone the PS4. We should all be happy with the decades old PS2 still. Creative developers can make amazing games on almost any hardware but each new generation of Playstation has traditionally push the boundries of what hardware was capable of doing at it's launch. The rumored PS4 does not. So what is going to make people throw out their existing console with their existing library of games to buy something that isn't backwards compatible and doesn't push the boundries beyond what a budget PC can already do. Just keep your old console or buy a budget PC.


RE: benjamin button
By Pirks on 1/16/2013 3:47:04 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
keep your old console or buy a budget PC
Most people are tech illiterate and don't know how to turn on a PC, so they'll keep buying new consoles since these are so much simpler to operate


RE: benjamin button
By ianweck on 1/16/2013 5:55:36 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
isn't backwards compatible


Do you know this to be true?

quote:
doesn't push the boundries beyond what a budget PC can already do.


Doesn't matter, people buying a PS4 probably don't care much about what a budget PC can do, only how the PS4 compares to the PS3. I'm assuming.


RE: benjamin button
By ianweck on 1/16/2013 6:07:47 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
isn't backwards compatible


Nevermind, I see why you said this now.


RE: benjamin button
By artemicion on 1/16/2013 6:36:24 PM , Rating: 2
You're being facetious, but ironically you make a point that a lot of consumers agree with. Personally, I'm dreading the release of the PS4/Xbox720 because it means money spent upgrading to a newer platform for features I don't want. Current gen graphics are fine by my standards and I'd rather not face the prospect of dropping $300-$400 to upgrade or being left in the dust.


RE: benjamin button
By epobirs on 1/17/2013 1:34:24 AM , Rating: 4
Don't be a slave to what other people are doing and you can save a lot of money. I waited nearly two years on both the Xbox 360 and PS3. I had a huge amount of games on older machine still waiting to be played and by the time I got the newer consoles they were in their second or third hardware revision and had substantial libraries of heavily discounted games.

There is no shame in having lesser funds for luxuries like gaming but spending beyond your means just because others are is something deserving of ridicule.


RE: benjamin button
By xti on 1/17/2013 5:51:31 PM , Rating: 2
he said you poor!


RE: benjamin button
By SPOOFE on 1/17/2013 3:53:49 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
Well heck then, why even release new consoles.

Because things like "recouping investment" exist in the real world.

Answer me this: Why is it so bad that Crysis (or arguably Metro 2033) stays the top graphics dog for five years? Five years is not a very long time. What sort of rush are you in? Think there's not going to be any more games in five years? The hell is wrong with you, you panicky Chicken Littles?

quote:
The rumored PS4 does not.

I have no idea what the PS4 will or won't do, and neither do you, you windbag.

The notion that we have to constantly push the GRAPHICS envelope is what cripple PC gaming in the late '90s. I think more and more gamers are accepting that design and gameplay are more important that MOAR SHADURRZZZ. It's sad that people criticize consoles for holding "game development" (read: fancy eye candy), because the truth is they're being done a service with an environment where the technological leaps are more granulated.

Take a deep breath, kids. It's not like technology doesn't advance. It's just not advancing at the rate of new GPU releases, and frankly, GOOD. In an industry where it could take years to make an excellent, polished, AAA game, I'd hate to think how much it would screw with things if developers had to constantly shift their target hardware reqs. Oh wait, I SAW THAT, it was called the friggin' '90s, and it sucked.

Goodbye, bad old days.


RE: benjamin button
By mcnabney on 1/17/2013 9:54:04 AM , Rating: 2
I agree with most of your post, but it is notable that a game remains at the top for half of a decade in an industry that grows as rapidly as CPU and GPU technology. Crysis has stayed on top not because it was so gosh-darn good, but because the entire industry decided to stay within the technological confines of a console generation. While that is all fine and good for the console industry - it is really a slap in the face to the PC industry because the software developers are effectively saying - you don't matter at all and we will continue to release games to you as a side-note.


RE: benjamin button
By OnyxNite on 1/17/2013 10:31:47 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Answer me this: Why is it so bad that Crysis (or arguably Metro 2033) stays the top graphics dog for five years? Five years is not a very long time. What sort of rush are you in? Think there's not going to be any more games in five years? The hell is wrong with you, you panicky Chicken Littles?

I'm not in a rush and there is nothing wrong with a great game remaining popular for any number of years but if instead of a game being good or not your metric is "top graphics" then a game remaining at the top of a technical metric such as that for 5 years is a bad sign for the industry that metric represents (in this case the graphics industry). Competition leads to innovation and if only player stays on top for a long time it is a sign there is little to no innovation and the industry stagnates.

quote:
I have no idea what the PS4 will or won't do, and neither do you, you windbag.


Do you know what "rumored" means? What part of me saying "The RUMORED PS4 does not." lead you to believe I was in any way saying I knew what the PS4 will or won't do?

The PC gaming industry was far stronger in the 90's when you argue the graphics race was crippling it than it is now when the developers instead are targeting the much weaker consoles and then just tweaking games for PCs. I'll take the graphics race over what we have today any day but really with things like Kickstarter and GoG now you'll get the interesting new gameplay innovations from the crowd sourced and indy areas that weren't as viable in the 90s at the same time you have the big boys pushing the graphically demanding AAA titles so things could potentially there could be a better balance. Just because you CAN have some games pushing the graphics envelope doesn't mean you can only get games that do. While I may buy Minecraft or back indy Kickstarter projects I'd also like to get a game here and there that really pushes the boundries of what modern hardware can do.


RE: benjamin button
By RufusM on 1/16/2013 2:13:09 PM , Rating: 1
yes, it wouldn't make a very fast gaming PC because of the overhead required by Windows and the various abstraction layers.

Consoles have consistent hardware so coding can get down to a much lower level offering higher performance for the specifications. Also, consoles only need to push pixels for 1080p (2K) resolution unless they're targeting 4K displays.

For example, Crysis was published for the Xbox 360 and it looks pretty good. It's not super high res but it's all there and it has better lighting than the original since it runs on CryEngine 3, also used by Crisis 2.


RE: benjamin button
By Nortel on 1/16/2013 2:37:21 PM , Rating: 2
All modern consoles run on an operating system... that is always running even when gaming. These console OS' have the very same abstraction layers, typically a lightweight linux kernel.

Many current Xbox games like battlefield only run at 30fps and at 720p(!). When you display 1080p, the 720p rendered image is upscalled to 1080p but it still only renders the screen at 720p and still only pushes 30fps.


RE: benjamin button
By Argon18 on 1/16/2013 3:30:11 PM , Rating: 1
LMAO, nobody is claiming a console doesn't have an OS. The assertion, which is true, is that a console doesn't have a bloated multi-purpose desktop OS like Windows. It has a very lean lightweight embedded OS, and that allows for better application performance on the same hardware.


RE: benjamin button
By mckirkus on 1/16/2013 2:38:13 PM , Rating: 2
Next gen consoles are reportedly going to remain capped at 30FPS. This is also vastly better than current generation consoles which some would argue are sufficient. Keep in mind that this will likely cost much less at launch than the PS3/XBox 360 which were released in a better economy.


RE: benjamin button
By Nortel on 1/16/2013 2:49:13 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Next gen consoles are reportedly going to remain capped at 30FPS.

The industry showing a big middle finger to the customer... I play borderlands 2 (on PC) at over 100fps on a 22" 120hz Samsung. In the year 2019 Sony expects customers to be happy with worse graphics than we had 5 years ago for the PC and only running at 30fps? Are people actually going to buy this trash and still pony up $60 for a game?


RE: benjamin button
By Pirks on 1/16/2013 3:32:55 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Are people actually going to buy this trash and still pony up $60 for a game?
Most people are tech illiterate and don't know how to turn on a PC so yes, they are.


RE: benjamin button
By piroroadkill on 1/17/2013 4:05:44 AM , Rating: 2
Well, exactly. That's you get with consoles these days.
You used to get something premium that was not really comparable to the PC, but now you just get poorly rendered versions of stuff you could be using your PC for.


RE: benjamin button
By ianweck on 1/16/2013 6:01:07 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The industry showing a big middle finger to the customer...


To the customer, or you?

quote:
Are people actually going to buy this trash and still pony up $60 for a game?


Probably be closer to $65 by then.


RE: benjamin button
By TakinYourPoints on 1/16/2013 4:40:23 PM , Rating: 2
That isn't how developing for a fixed platform works. Developers can milk that sort of thing for far longer because they learn to optimize for hardware over long periods of time. This is very different from optimizing for a platform with higher overhead like the PC that is a moving target.

Compare a release title for the PS3 like The Bouncer with a later release like God Of War 2. GOW2 looked so good that it stood toe to toe with XBox 360 games that were coming out at the same time. They were squeezing every last drop of blood from that ancient PS2 hardware, but they did it. The same thing is happening now, compare Halo 3 with the newest one, GTA 4 with the expansions, and GTA4 with the release films of GTA5. This is all on ancient hardware with only 512MB of RAM.

I'm mainly a PC guy when it comes to games, haven't fired up my 360 in weeks and I mainly use my PS3 for Blu Rays. That said, looking at raw hardware specs hasn't worked with consoles before and it won't work now. Optimizing for a static platform is a much different game than what happens on PCs.


RE: benjamin button
By epobirs on 1/17/2013 1:45:44 AM , Rating: 2
There is a long history to this. You'll see the best of a platform when it has to compete with much more powerful new platforms. What they squeezed out of the Commodore 64 in its last years as the Amiga became the top gaming platform was pretty amazing.

I'd argue that for someone who hasn't had a console for a long time and wants to get back into it, now is a great time to buy a PS3 or Xbox 360. Huge libraries at low prices. Especially on the PS3 side where they've been taking advantage of the Blu-ray format to release collections of HD remakes of PS2 classics on a single disc. I just started playing the Jak & Daxter collection last night. Polygon counts onthe models were pretty low but in general it looked great and the gameplay was still excellent after all these years. Not bad for a title that can be easily found for $20 or less.

Wait for the new machines to mature, getting decent libraries and reduced prices on the early titles. Then consider whether the price is right.


RE: benjamin button
By TakinYourPoints on 1/17/2013 7:21:19 PM , Rating: 2
The C64 example is a great example, the differences between a C64 game from 1982 and 1988 was huuuuuuge.

Rattling off raw specs doesn't make much sense with static platforms, the whole point is that developers get better and better out of optimizing specifically for them. By the end of its lifecycle it starts to overlap with the initial wave of next-gen titles.

Good call on picking up an old system as well, all three have such amazing libraries that can be had for cheap these days.


"You can bet that Sony built a long-term business plan about being successful in Japan and that business plan is crumbling." -- Peter Moore, 24 hours before his Microsoft resignation














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