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The weekly injection removed 80 percent of senile plaques that cause Alzheimer's

Canadian researchers have come one giant step closer to finding treatment for those with Alzheimer's disease, and even a preventative vaccine.

The team of researchers hail from Université Laval, CHU de Québec, and pharmaceutical firm GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), and was led by Dr. Serge Rivest, professor at Université Laval's Faculty of Medicine and researcher at the CHU de Québec research center.

A key part of Alzheimer's disease is the production of a toxic molecule called amyloid beta. The body's defenders, called microglial cells, cannot eliminate amyloid beta, and that's when senile plaques are formed.

But the new study gives the brain's immune cells a boost through monophosphoryl lipid A, called MPL, which is a vaccine that has already been proven safe through its use with GSK.

After giving mice with Alzheimer's symptoms weekly injections of MPL for 12 weeks, about 80 percent of senile plaques were eliminated. Also, the mice showed improvement in cognitive function.

According to the team, the MPL injection could not only slow the progression of the disease in patients already showing symptoms, but also be used as a preventative vaccine for those at risk.

Last September, the cancer drugs erlotinib (Tarceva) and gefitinib (Iressa) were used to cure Alzheimer's in fruit flies and rats.

Source: Science Daily



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Sign Me Up!
By DaveLessnau on 1/16/2013 10:46:07 AM , Rating: 5
I hope this stuff works out (and quickly). I'm getting tired of walking across the house to do something and having no idea why I'm there when I arrive.




RE: Sign Me Up!
By NanoTube1 on 1/16/2013 10:52:48 AM , Rating: 2
This is not funny my friend, this is dead serious.


RE: Sign Me Up!
By DaveLessnau on 1/16/2013 12:09:05 PM , Rating: 5
I guess my writing was bad. I AM dead serious. I live in mortal fear that my constant, increasingly common, increasingly worse forgetfulness is leading up to full-blown Alzheimers. I can also throw in the fine experiences of being in a conversation with someone and realizing that I've forgotten their name. Or having someone ask me my phone number and realizing that all I've got is a null pointer instead of a number. Ditto for my address. It's a weird experience. It's not like I don't know the thing I'm trying to remember: I can feel it in there somewhere. I just can't find it. If something prompts me with the start of the data, I can reel off the rest immediately. I just lose the pointer.

I've tried various vitamins and supplements to no avail. If this stuff gets through testing and works, it would be a godsend.


RE: Sign Me Up!
By DanNeely on 1/16/2013 1:08:51 PM , Rating: 3
You need to talk about it with your physician soon. While there's nothing that can cure it on the market, there are drugs that will slow it's progress. Since they can't reverse it, you need to start on them as soon as possible to preserve your mind as long as possible.


RE: Sign Me Up!
By cpeter38 on 1/16/2013 3:17:06 PM , Rating: 2
+6!


RE: Sign Me Up!
By mike66 on 1/16/2013 3:45:38 PM , Rating: 2
You are suffering short term memory loss due to having a sizeable brain tumor pushing your brain forward, I know because I have the same symptom from my inoperable golf ball sized brain tumor, you also by your post lack emotional sympathy, another sign because your tumor is causing bipolarism. That does sound a bit alarming does it not? But don't worry you have the option of having a few treatments that will cause greater damaged to the tissue around the tumor so you will not know who the hell you are any more if you don't become a living vegetable. Again don't worry as by the time you finish reading this chances are you will have forgotten this...........
Welcome to my world.


RE: Sign Me Up!
By Samus on 1/16/2013 10:08:38 PM , Rating: 2
need I say....TAKE MY MONEY!?


RE: Sign Me Up!
By owsharp on 1/17/2013 1:22:08 PM , Rating: 2
FYI, forwarded this article to a PhD researcher friend whose focus is on Alzheimers. She says its been fairly exciting news to researchers for awhile, but no one thinks this is likely to actually be a cure. The treatments are effective on a particular model of Alzheimers that some people think isn't very accurate of human Alzheimers. More importantly, the treatment induces an inflammatory reaction that most likely would result in it being too dangerous to ever be approved as a human treatment :(

In my friend's words, though, "But who knows!"


RE: Sign Me Up!
By phxfreddy on 1/16/2013 6:55:52 PM , Rating: 2
Reading what???


RE: Sign Me Up!
By Ytsejamer1 on 1/16/2013 11:00:15 AM , Rating: 1
I agree with your first sentiment 100%...this would be great. I always wonder about when possible "cures" or treatments are mentioned. Drug companies don't want to cure anything, they want to treat symptoms. That's their business. They don't want people getting healthy.

As for the other related wit...kind of funny. I remember telling my aunt a funny joke about the disease. She was taking care of my poor grandmother who was losing it completely. At some point, you have to make a joke and get a smile where you can. It's a horrendous disease to watch develop in a loved one.

The joke is...or paraphrased. Why is Easter an Alzheimer's favorite holiday? Answer: You can hide your own Easter eggs.


RE: Sign Me Up!
By unplug on 1/16/2013 11:31:22 AM , Rating: 2
/crickets


RE: Sign Me Up!
By Ytsejamer1 on 1/16/2013 11:57:55 AM , Rating: 2
fair enough...i thought it was funny when I heard it. Oh well.


RE: Sign Me Up!
By DaveLessnau on 1/16/2013 12:12:40 PM , Rating: 2
I try to put a good spin on it, too. Instead of Easter Eggs, I just tell myself it'll let me save money on books. I can keep re-reading the ones I have instead of buying new ones.

Recently, I re-read a book that I KNOW I've read before. I remembered not one word, not one event, not one plotline (not one jot or tittle) in the whole thing. That's scary.


RE: Sign Me Up!
By Ramstark on 1/16/2013 12:50:13 PM , Rating: 3
Hell it is. This is the most scary thing for me, that one day, I watch my son directly to his eyes and not know who he is or why he is worried.
We humans are all about our minds, if we lose it in a way that you forget everything (the good things and the bad things) then there is no point in living anymore, at least that my opinion. I'd rather die than forget.
I'll be following this "vaccine" close, when it is available, I will take it undoubtedly.


RE: Sign Me Up!
By Nutzo on 1/16/2013 11:39:43 AM , Rating: 2
I think you need to add a little more tin foil to your hat...

Drug companies don't want to cure anything??
I guess all the cures, vacines, etc they have come out with over the past decades must be my imagination.
The basic truth is that the Drug companies want to make money. A "cure" is likely to cost more than an initial treatment, since they have to recoupe the development cost over a much shorter treatment period.


RE: Sign Me Up!
By gamerk2 on 1/16/2013 11:42:04 AM , Rating: 2
To be fair, the Federal government has to reimburse medical companies to create vaccines, because they aren't profitable. As a result, most Vaccine research is done in Medical Labs, not by Medico's.


RE: Sign Me Up!
By Omega215D on 1/16/2013 12:55:17 PM , Rating: 2
People like this are the reason why some illnesses are making a comeback and possibly why this flu season seems to be pretty bad (that and also many city folk are slobs).


RE: Sign Me Up!
By Flunk on 1/16/2013 1:17:28 PM , Rating: 2
Talk to your doctor, you could be paranoid. That's different drugs.


RE: Sign Me Up!
By Wolfpup on 1/16/2013 1:22:54 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah, this is really awesome. Seems too good to be true.

I'm worried too, as I've always been forgetful...

Would be AMAAAAAZING if we could cure and treat this!


RE: Sign Me Up!
By Netscorer on 1/16/2013 1:43:58 PM , Rating: 2
Everyone is forgetful, not everyone have or would ever have an Alzheimer's. Our memory is structured in a way that most of information we process never gets into permanent memory, it sort of being cached for a while and then flushed when new information needs to get processed. Plus, our memory is mostly associative, i.e. you would never remember what you did on January 13th 5 years ago, but when you meet your friend or go to a park, you would remember fleshes of similar events that very well may have happened on that particular day. The drawback of associative memory is that without a proper reference point (or an association) information seems to be lost or forgotten.


RE: Sign Me Up!
By Omega215D on 1/16/2013 2:17:18 PM , Rating: 2
Remember how I took that home wine making course and forgot how to drive?


RE: Sign Me Up!
By michael2k on 1/17/2013 6:24:04 PM , Rating: 2
Have you considered 5 cups of coffee a day?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20182037


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