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Nissan Leaf  (Source: nissanusa.com)
It will produce the Leaf in Tennessee starting Thursday

Nissan didn't manage to meet its goals for 2012, but the auto company is looking forward to a better 2013 by starting Leaf production in the United States.

Nissan announced that it will begin Leaf production at a new plant in Smyrna, Tennessee this Thursday. It will build the Leaf and gasoline vehicles in this plant, while building batteries at a separate plant next door.

The plant is the result of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) loan for $1.4 billion in 2010. According to the DOE, Nissan can build up to 150,000 Leafs and 200,000 batteries annually at the Tennessee plants.

Nissan added that the new plants have created over 300 manufacturing jobs. In 2010, the DOE expected that both projects would create about 1,300 jobs. Nissan said the number of jobs is expected to increase over time.


Nissan's Leaf had a tough time last year as far as sales and performance goes. In July 2012, Leaf owners in Arizona complained that their EVs were losing significant battery capacity in the desert's hot heat. Nissan responded by basically saying that this was normal, and promised more open communication with owners of the Leaf EV.

Later, Nissan had to admit that it wasn't going to hit its sales mark for 2012, which was 20,000 Leafs. However, it only sold 9,819 Leafs for the whole year -- less than half of its goal, and only 1.5 percent higher than the number it sold in 2011.

Nissan had even more ambitious goals back in 2010 when it announced that it would sell 500,000 EVs per year by the end of 2013. However, in October 2012, Nissan saw the reality of its sales and adjusted that number to 1.5 million EVs sold cumulatively by 2016.

Source: The Detroit News



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RE: Good
By conquistadorst on 1/11/2013 9:19:47 AM , Rating: 2
I was just in Hawaii for a few weeks. While I am sure there are some, I did not personally see a single EV my entire vacation. This really surprised me because they had wind generators and solar panels on every home galore. And yes, I drove ~700 miles so I spent a good deal of time on the road and not just in the parks and beaches. After weighing the costs, it really made perfect sense to never see an EV because an increased cost to electricity makes an EV uneconomical from every angle. I agree with CharonPDX, rising electricity costs would completely annihilate the EV market. ***UNLESS*** gas prices also rose proportionally which also cannot be denied as a possibility.

Also, unfortunately, your math may be a little off because it does not include delivery costs from the utility. In some bills, the "delivery charges" can account to nearly half the bill which includes both flat rate and a per KWH costs.


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