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  (Source: Associated Press)
Some OEMs, however, still aren't seeing big demand for Microsoft's new touch-centric operating system

Back in November, Microsoft announced that it had sold 40 million Windows 8 licenses, outpacing the sales performance of its predecessor, Windows 7. Today, just over a month later, Microsoft announced that it has sold 60 million Windows 8 licenses (upgrades and licenses sold to OEMs), once again outpacing Windows 7. It took Windows 7 a little over three months to cross the 60 million licenses sold threshold.
 
While the large number of licenses sold is definitely good news, a recent report suggests that actual usage figures for Windows 8 are below that of Windows 7 at the same point in its release cycle and is actually tracking below that of the much-maligned Windows Vista operating system. Simply put, 60 million licenses sold doesn't mean that there are actually 60 million Windows 8 devices out there in the hands of consumers and business.
 
This backs up the assertion from some outlets and OEMs that Windows 8 sales have been rather "meh".
 
“There was not a huge spark in the market," said Emmanuel Fromont, head of Acer's American division. “It’s a slow start, there’s no question.” ASUS CFO David Chang stated, "Demand for Windows 8 is not that good right now." And Fujitsu's President added that Windows 8 demand was "weak".
 
On the app front, Microsoft announced that customers have downloaded over 100 million apps from the Windows Store.

Sources: Microsoft, AllThingsD



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You all are killing me...
By 3DPro on 1/9/2013 1:53:28 PM , Rating: 2
After spending an hour consuming every post in this thread thus far, I must admit, I am somewhat shocked that both supporters and haters seem to be missing the ultimate point of Windows 8.

UI Innovation.

Let me explain. Ever since moving from CLI based paradigms to the GUI paradigm (the genesis of which was predicated on how children learn – hand-eye coordination, rather than command languages via CLI interfaces) in the early 70s (although first introduced in the mid-60s), GUIs have remained, for all intents and purposes, virtually identical to their original feature/usage offerings.

Think about that for a moment… the computer industry has not truly innovated in the UI/UX interface space, to any significant degree beyond the original GUI premise, in over 50 years! That is staggering when one considers the advancements in CPUs, GPUs, RAM, VRAM, motherboard bandwidth, hard drive capacity/spindle performance, SSDs and display resolution/bit-depth/scanning frequencies. Everything I just mentioned has gone through unbelievable advancements, however advancements within the UI/UX have remained virtually stagnant.

Windows 8 is all about the paradigm shift that is currently taking place in the UI/UX field, specifically, the introduction of Natural User Interfaces (NUIs). In other words, think UIs/UXs introduced via science fiction movies (such as Minority Report (2002) and The Matrix Reloaded (2003) – are the first that come to mind).

Can you, for a moment, imagine Tom Cruise’s character squinting to look for the “X” close button interface element, or looking for that 50x50 pixel static icon to launch another program? It is borderline hilarious to even imagine in one’s imagination how incredibly “disappointing” (for lack of better vernacular) that would have been! No, he did not do that at all, he simply “swiped away” the information/program he was finished consuming… naturally.

Think of the traffic controller at Zion, in the docking sequence, as she directed the crew of the Nebuchadnezzar; she was using columns and rows of little 50x50 pixel, static icons? Nay… oh, then she was using a mouse? Nay… her UI/UX was completely NUI based.

With those two examples in your mind, imagine, if you can, a current Google/Android UI/UX… or a current iPhone/iPad/iOS UI/UX… do any of those remotely resemble the UI/UX depicted in the above two examples?

Now consider the UI/UX of Windows Phone 8/Windows RT/Windows 8/XBOX 360… do any of those resemble the UI/UX depicted in the above two examples?

I petition that, for the first time in Microsoft’s history, they are actually innovating; not advancing via acquisition of other companies or copying/mimicking other competitors offerings. The pathetic rows and columns of static, lifeless (dumb) icons contained within Android/iOS UIs/UXs are as dated as the UIs/UXs of the 50s, equally laughable and pathetic when comparing them to the unified UI/UX of the Microsoft stack.

Consider for a moment that Microsoft is so far out in front of the next evolution of human to computer interfaces offered via the next wave of NUI paradigms, that, Google/Apple will be playing catch-up for at least the next 3 to 4 years; especially with an offering that is unified across the entire spectrum of computing devices.

In other words, step back for a moment and breathe… I for one am so ready to interface with my computing devices in a way previously only offered in film. It is just my .02 worth (and I am confident many of you will believe that is all it is worth *Grin*), but I believe Microsoft is far closer to offering such a NUI paradigm, as evidenced by their complete OS stack, than anyone else in the world currently are.

Baby steps, Padawans… baby steps (if Android/iOS have anything to say about it). Perhaps it is, “One giant step for mankind”, if Microsoft have anything to say about it…




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