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Print 5 comment(s) - last by gladiatorua.. on Jan 8 at 5:12 PM

AMD also talked up partnerships with ASUS, HP, and Vizio

AMD held a small press conference today at CES in which it unveiled a few new computing products meant to take aim at the mobile sector. AMD often seems to play second fiddle to Intel when it comes to mind/market share, and the Sunnyvale, CA-based company took many opportunities to tout its superiority over Intel in a few select benchmarks this afternoon.
 
AMD showed off prototypes running its new system on chip (SoC) APUs: Temash and Kabini. While both are quad-core x86 APUs, Kabini is targeted at ultrathin notebooks and small form factor PCs, while Temash is targeting tablets and hybrid notebooks. Temash offers twice the graphics performance of its predecessor, Hondo. Kabini, on the other hand, provides a 50 percent boost over Brazos 2.0.

[Image Source: Brandon Hill/DailyTech]
 
AMD also showcased Richland, which will offer a 20 to 40 percent boost in performance over previous generation A-Series APUs and is aimed at "thin and light machines". The follow-up to Richland, Kaveri, will ship in the latter half of 2013.
 
But if you’ve been following AMD roadmaps at all, most of this information shouldn’t be new to you. We already gave you an overview of what AMD had in store for 2013 back in February 2012.

[Image Source: Brandon Hill/DailyTech]
 
However, the big thing will be AMD executing on its roadmap and getting design wins for its APUs. HP has been a big supporter of AMD in years past and announced new products using AMD chips today. Likewise, Vizio is also onboard with an all-in-one desktop, notebooks, and tablets using AMD processors.

[Image Source: Brandon Hill/DailyTech]

AMD today stressed that tablets are the future, and made the distinction between consumption devices (ARM-based tablets) and workhorse tablets (featuring what AMD calls notebooks chip crammed into tablets resulting in poor battery life). AMD wants to play right down the middle and offer a nice balance of battery life and performance for consumers. AMD may be late to the tablet game, but hopefully what they bring to the table is enough to make OEMs and consumers stand up and take notice.

Source: AMD



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I'd double check that core count..
By Alexvrb on 1/8/2013 12:20:46 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
AMD showed off prototypes running its new system on chip (SoC) APUs: Temash and Kabini. While both are quad-core x86 APUs, Kabini is targeted at ultrathin notebooks and small form factor PCs, while Temash is targeting tablets and hybrid notebooks.
Temash is going to be 2 core, just like Hondo before it. The entire Temash SoC will use less power than just the Hondo APU, while delivering more performance (especially graphics performance doubling as the article noted, Temash will be an interesting competitor on those grounds alone).

Kabini will most likely come in both 2 and 4 core variants, covering a wider range of power/thermal targets. The jump in GPU performance over Brazos 2.0 is almost as impressive at 50% considering power is supposed to drop too. Combined with decently clocked Jaguar cores, the x86 performance will also see a substantial boost. Kabini might actually make for a halfway decent cheap ultrathin or hybrid, in addition to the normal ultrabudget machines.




RE: I'd double check that core count..
By Alexvrb on 1/8/2013 12:25:16 AM , Rating: 2
Ack. I'm getting tired. Temash in TABLETS is going to be two core. But will also be available in 4 core for more power hungry devices. But they're still both not exclusively quad cores, especially in tablets.


By Assimilator87 on 1/8/2013 11:21:04 AM , Rating: 3
AMD needs to push hard to get these parts into tablets because until Atom gets its 22nm refresh, it's garbage compared to the APUs.


The future of what?
By bug77 on 1/8/2013 6:59:14 AM , Rating: 3
"AMD today stressed that tablets are the future"

Sure, people want as much power as possible in as little space as possible. It is only natural.
But it will be a sad day when software developers will be forced to use something like today's tablets because there is no PC anymore.




RE: The future of what?
By gladiatorua on 1/8/2013 5:12:12 PM , Rating: 2
I doubt things will end up like this.
The problem is, Intel is doing nothing(?) visible to compete with ARM. And by compete I mean bring something x86 to $300 niche. The can produce almost all components for a tablet. But it's somewhat understandable because.
On the other hand MS overzealously embraced tablet UI(even limitations) even on PC where there is almost no place for it, ignoring the fact that WinNT 6.X is somewhat overbloated for a tablet. So you can't expect a $300 tablet to run Windows8 x86.... Even with it's nice-ish UI... FOR A TABLET, NOT DESKTOP OR MOST LAPTOPS!


"Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment -- same piece of hardware -- paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be." -- Steve Ballmer














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