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Print 129 comment(s) - last by acturbo.. on Jan 13 at 1:51 PM

Windows 7 had more than 10 times the usage at this point in its lifecycle

Three weeks after its 2009 launch, Windows 7 had seized 4 percent of the operating system (OS) market, and would go on to become the fastest selling OS in Microsoft Corp.'s (MSFT) history.  Three years later and Microsoft has another release -- Windows 8.  But some signs point to the operating system as being a sales bust, early on.

Microsoft had bragged weeks ago that it had sold 40 million licenses, a number that it said surpassed sales of Windows 7 for an equivalent period in 2009.  But some complained that license sales were not actual device sales; they cite reports of Windows 8 computers languishing on store shelves.

Now the critics have ammo to back those claims. Market research group Net Applications, a research service that tracks traffic across 8,000 affiliates' sites and 3 million registered users, reports that Windows 8 at the end of December accounted for a mere 1.72 percent of traffic.  

In other words, after two months Windows 8 appears to have about a third of market share Windows 7 garnered in less than one month.  By two months into its lifecycle, Windows 7 has soared to 21 percent of the market's traffic (Windows 7 is now the top PC OS with 45 percent of traffic).
 
Windows 8 Surface
Windows 8's adoption pace appears to be more sluggish than Windows Vista's.
[Image Source: Microsoft]

Windows 8's numbers look more like those of Windows Vista -- but even a bit worse.  Vista posted about 2.2 percent of the total traffic at the same 2-month point, about a third more than Windows 8's percentage [source].

Merle McIntosh, a product manager SVP at top online computer retailer Newegg, was cautious in his criticism, confirming that Windows 8 "did not explode" onto the market. But he remains hopeful, noting that sales have been slowly creeping upward.

Windows 8 is an incredibly bold redesign on the part on Microsoft.  While, the move to a more touch-friendlygraphically rich operating system certainly mirrors the general direction of the device market, but that has done little to shield Microsoft from loads of criticism. Many have wondered whether it went too far with the graphical gloss, whether it was disrespecting developers with its shift to a walled-garden "Windows Store" app distribution model, and whether it was forsaking traditional desktop power users.

So will Windows 8 be the next Vista sales wise?  The critics certainly would say so.  But at this point it's kind of early to say; about all that's safe to say is that the picture might not be as rosy as Microsoft wanted you to believe.

Sources: Net Applications, ComputerWorld, ReadWriteWeb



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RE: The only thing that interests me in Windows 8
By althaz on 1/5/2013 5:30:51 AM , Rating: 0
Boot to Desktop SHOULD be an option, I agree, but there's no reason to turn metro off (in fact that doesn't even make sense) and the normal start menu is crap and nobody used it (everything you used the start menu for the start screen is a lot better at, except for there being no way to set the default search to "Search Everything").


RE: The only thing that interests me in Windows 8
By boobo on 1/6/2013 8:25:30 PM , Rating: 3
Some things I used the Start menu for, Metro COULD have been a lot better at, but they chose not to.

I used the Start menu to bring up the taskbar during driver (and other installshield) installations. The installers decided that they should have the right to cover the entire screen and make the taskbar inaccessible. With the Start button, I just had to press the Windows key and the taskbar was instantly in the foreground.

Windows 8 could have given me this too, if they had kept the taskbar visible in Metro. It seems so easy and logical! Why would you want to stop multitasking when using apps? They took my Windows-key taskbar popping function and on top of that, they also hide the taskbar while Start-menuing.

Something else I did with the Start menu was organize things.

In the Start Menu's "Programs" I just had 5 folders: Drivers, Office, Programming, Art, and Games. Subfolders guided me to where I wanted to go.
Art->Static->2D->Natural->Corel->P ainter:bunch of icons
Games->Adventure->Point and Click->Detective->GOG->Tex Murphy->2: bunch of icons

The Start menu also let me easily put shortcuts to the same game somewhere inside "Detectives" and also somewhere inside "SciFI".

Windows 8 could have given me this too with something as common and simple as collapsible tiles. Every node based application has had them for years! Not only did they decide that groups could not be collapsed; they also decided to flatten the hierarchy so that now you can't even have 1 subgroup level! The top level groups are the only level of organization and they all have to be visible at once.

I have over 200 games from GOG alone, each with its uninstaller and link to the manual and map, etc. Finding the correct icon in that sea of hundreds of tiles with only one level of organization is not in the same Galaxy as where the Start menu was. I don't even have any Steam games in Start anymore because then it would be thousands, all uncategorized.

So now, unless I remember the name of the executable, I have to search for a game in the Start Screen, in the Steam interface, the Gamefly interface and the Gamestop interface until I find it.

Categorization and a multi-tasking Start Screen that includes the taskbar. Two vital features of the old Start menu that I have trouble living without.


RE: The only thing that interests me in Windows 8
By rsmech on 1/6/2013 11:16:41 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Windows 8 could have given me this too, if they had kept the taskbar visible in Metro. It seems so easy and logical!


Try moving you mouse to the upper left corner in metro and you have open programs. they gave it to you and better. you just missed it.


By boobo on 1/7/2013 4:51:24 PM , Rating: 2
Thank you for your help, friend, but my OS must be broken somehow. I have 5 programs open: Chrome, JimmyRig, Zbrush, Lightwave, and PhotoPaint. In the start screen, I go to the upper left corner and there is only one block that pops up (which looks like a snapshot of my desktop). That is not comparable to the taskbar that has an individual button for every single open program/document (I've set it to "never combine"), so mine must be different from yours or I'm just not getting it.


RE: The only thing that interests me in Windows 8
By rsmech on 1/6/2013 11:19:59 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
In the Start Menu's "Programs" I just had 5 folders: Drivers, Office, Programming, Art, and Games. Subfolders guided me to where I wanted to go.


I'm staring at a file explorer icon lower left windows 8. click it you could have been staring at something very similar to what your talking about. you missed it. I've only had windows 8 for 5 days.


By boobo on 1/7/2013 4:59:58 PM , Rating: 2
Thank you for your valuable advice! However, I never tried to imply that Windows 8 did not have the tools to categorize that way. The post I was replying to said that the >Start Screen< could do everything that the Star menu could (and better). So I tried to limit myself to the problems of the Start Screen itself. Since the file explorer is not technically part of the Start screen, we're actually substituting the Start Screen with something more akin to the old Start menu, when we use the file explorer. The original post said that it was crazy to substitute it with anything. So, I think we agree 100%.


By rsmech on 1/6/2013 11:27:07 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
I have over 200 games from GOG alone, each with its uninstaller and link to the manual and map, etc. Finding the correct icon in that sea of hundreds of tiles with only one level of organization is not in the same Galaxy as where the Start menu was. I don't even have any Steam games in Start anymore because then it would be thousands, all uncategorized.


there is a neat little tile on metro that takes you to desktop. once done there is a nice little file explorer lower left you can set up with any files and sub folders you wish. you can make it as easy or as complex as you want. Metro isn't the best option for every action you want to take, it's just many short cuts in one place. you don't have all your hundreds of games on your windows 7 desktop why would you even complain you can't in Metro. Kind of silly argument. your windows 7 desktop couldn't even hold them.


By rsmech on 1/6/2013 11:30:09 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Categorization and a multi-tasking Start Screen that includes the taskbar. Two vital features of the old Start menu that I have trouble living without.


You can do on desktop file explorer 1 click. you have to organize them just as you organized windows 7 start programs.
Multi-tasking start screen, Metro ui move your mouse to upper left corner.
You don't have to live with out.


By Sta5h on 1/7/2013 7:23:36 AM , Rating: 2
Not being funny, but since you already have Steam installed, why wouldn't you use it for all your games, keeping them entirely out of the start menu?

Uninstalling? Personally, again, I just use the built in Windows uninstaller for that (and Steam for actual Steam games obviously).

The manuals… I guess some games you're going to read them more often (personally I just about never do), but if you *do* already have the shortcuts in your start screen/menu, can't you just start typing the name of the game and you'll see it? I honestly don't see the problem people have with doing this since you must know the name of the app/game you're trying to launch (you don't need to remember the name of the executable if there's a shortcut in the start screen/menu)? I'd honestly like it explained to me.

Don't get me started on Gamestop/Origin (grrr). Honestly, until something else better comes along, and since most of my games are already in there, I just add any non-Steam games right into the Steam interface when I buy them, and then I just go to Steam whenever I want to play a game.


By Wererat on 1/9/2013 5:00:10 PM , Rating: 2
"Art->Static->2D->Natural->Corel->P ainter:bunch of icons
Games->Adventure->Point and Click->Detective->GOG->Tex Murphy->2: bunch of icons"

Really? You moused through six levels of start menu to do ANYthing? This is the justification for why you want to keep a start menu?

Personally I HATE the start menu for just this reason. If I want anything that complex, I'll just bring up the file manager/explorer and go find it already. In addition, MS never mandated an organizational structure for installers, so some programs will try and add a simple "<Name of Program>" shortcut or folder, and others are in love with their company name and will bury the only executable under "<company>/<suite of programs>/<program>" (including Office) so you're several clicks in to just start working.

Sure you CAN reorganize it as you've done in Win95/98/XP/Vista/7, but I could also spend that time finding spare socks, too.

Crud, go build a directory structure like this with all the pointers(shortcuts) at their roots (which is all the vaunted 'start menu' is anyway) and map a tile to its head.


"Young lady, in this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics!" -- Homer Simpson














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