backtop


Print 6 comment(s) - last by Lord_Conrad.. on Jan 3 at 5:04 AM


  (Source: flyingsuicide.net)
HP's filing said it may “dispose of a business at a price or on terms that are less desirable than we had anticipated”

Hewlett-Packard (HP) has been in a tough spot for some time now, and to hopefully improve that position a bit, the company recently said it's considering disposing of businesses that aren't meeting goals.

HP's December 10-K filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission stated that the company is currently evaluating "the potential disposition of assets and businesses" that are no longer helping them meet objectives.

“When we decide to sell assets or a business, we may encounter difficulty in finding buyers or alternative exit strategies on acceptable terms in a timely manner, which could delay the achievement of our strategic objectives,” said Hewlett-Packard.

The filing also said that HP may “dispose of a business at a price or on terms that are less desirable than we had anticipated” and “the impact of the divestiture on our revenue growth may be larger than projected."

HP has endured a bumpy ride over the past years, mainly due to former CEO Leo Apotheker. Back in August 2011, HP announced that it was abandoning its webOS platform and TouchPad tablets for good. It had acquired the webOS platform from Palm for $1.2 billion USD only a year previous. 

That same month, HP planned to sell off its Personal Systems Group (PSG), which is responsible for consumer and business PCs. Later, it was announced that HP was leaning more toward a spin-off PC business than a sale.

When current CEO Meg Whitman stepped up to the plate shortly after those baffling announcements, HP ended up not selling its PC unit or having a spin-off. Whitman kept the PC business in-house.

More recently, HP alleged that HP subsidiary Autonomy's former owners committed approximately $5B USD in accounting "improprieties", which they suggest amount to fraud.

In November 2012, it was reported that HP would take an $
8.8 billion hit due to "accounting improprieties." 

Source: Bloomberg



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Worst company in the world
By augiem on 1/2/2013 2:38:55 PM , Rating: 2
I will never buy another HP product again after the Palm/Touchpad fiasco (no OpenWebOS support!?). And lets not even mention all the countless problems with every single HP product that everyone I know has bought in the past 10 years. HP belongs on the dung heap of history. They've coasted off their reputation pre-1990's too long. End the suffering already.




RE: Worst company in the world
By SAN-Man on 1/2/2013 6:38:46 PM , Rating: 2
The last HP product I personally used was an HP-Compaq NC6000 notebook from 2005. I used it through 2008 with no issues. This is a business class product though. HP's retail products have always been trash but so have Dell's, Acer's, IBM's, etc.

I was in Costco the other day and looked at an HP notebook. It was total garbage (but so were the Asus, Dell and Lenovo they had too). It felt like it wouldn't like two weeks, super thin plastics. Of course, for $499 what do you want?


RE: Worst company in the world
By arthur449 on 1/3/2013 4:26:16 AM , Rating: 2
It depends on the product. I have an old convertible notebook/tablet (TX2000) from 2008 that has been an invaluable convenience with its wacom digitizer. Also, we got an HP dm1z notebook in 2011 that we use as an HTPC. Then there's the OfficeJet Pro 7600 and its successor the 8500 that handle all the network scanning/printing that the household requires.

It's important to manage expectations of a product. Admittedly, any of the above inexpensive consumer HP products would probably not last long in all-day everyday (business) use, but they work fine if they're only stressed occasionally.


By Lord_Conrad on 1/3/2013 5:04:37 AM , Rating: 2
I disagree. I have a 2009 HP DV6 laptop that continues to work perfectly. It's even faster now than it was when I bought it (thanks to a SSD install). When I bought it I wiped the hard drive and did a fresh windows install to get rid of the bloatware, but you have to do that on pretty much any laptop nowadays.


"You can bet that Sony built a long-term business plan about being successful in Japan and that business plan is crumbling." -- Peter Moore, 24 hours before his Microsoft resignation














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki