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Beloved icon of Windows history appears to be in the rear view for good

For those upset about the lack of a start button in Windows 8, prepare yourself for another disappointment -- "Windows Blue", an upcoming short-cycle successor to Windows 8, is not expected to bring the feature back.

The source of this supposed leak is CNBeta, a site with close insider ties at Microsoft Corp. (MSFT), which gained respect by accurately leaking a number of early Windows 8 details.

Other info from the site includes suggests that Microsoft will further flatten the UI on the desktop (think the Metro/Windows 8 UI style), the taskbar/desktop will get tweaks, the price will be low (or free), and the new kernel version number will be v6.3 (corroborated by other independent reports).  The final remnants of the Aero UI, which was a staple of Windows Vista and Windows 7 is also being bid adieu, like the Start button before it.

Windows 7 Start Button
The start button went the way of the Dodo with Windows 8. [Image Source: Jason Mick/DailyTech]

Neowin reports that a summer launch of Windows Blue is expected.  And its contacts close to Microsoft hint that the name will be some sort of riff on Windows 8, not Windows 9, as some suspected.

(For the record you can get a Start Menu-like menu by moving your mouse to the lower left corner of the screen and right-clicking.  Voilà, magic!)

Sources: CNBeta, NeoWin



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RE: Free market
By TakinYourPoints on 12/28/2012 6:10:10 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Uhh --- then why is half the Windows user base still XP?


A large portion of the Windows userbase isn't consumers, it is businesses, things like point-of-sale stations, data entry, call centers, etc etc. Those will stick with what they have for as long as possible. The cost of upgrading tens of thousands of computers that they've had for the last eight years from XP to 7 or 8 is tremendous.

Most companies are slow to upgrade anything, and computers fall under that category. Honestly, upgrades generally don't happen in large numbers until hardware actually starts failing and they are forced to get the newest version of Windows because that is what their Dell or HP econoboxes come with.

Look at it this way, that insecure, non-standards compliant, dog-slow web browser IE6 still has a surprisingly large number of users in business because of some applications that only work with it.

Lots of old tech isn't held because it is better. Vista was actually far superior to XP after patches and drivers caught up several months later. No, it is held because it is "good enough" and the physical and training costs are too high for most to justify.

A rocky start with something like Vista or 8 is certainly less incentive though.


"You can bet that Sony built a long-term business plan about being successful in Japan and that business plan is crumbling." -- Peter Moore, 24 hours before his Microsoft resignation














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