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Print 42 comment(s) - last by hughlle.. on Dec 24 at 7:12 AM


  (Source: geek.com)
For those who want to participate in the Steam for Linux beta program, download the most recent Steam Linux client or upgrade

Valve Corporation has announced that the Steam for Linux beta program is now open to the public.

Up until this point, the Steam for Linux beta program was closed to the public, but making it available itsn't the only Steam-related news. Steam for Linux beta client bugs will be tracked through GitHub, which is a change from the use of forums in the closed version. Anyone can access the Steam for Linux repository with a free GitHub account in order to create, edit and track new issues as well as search others in the database.

There are a few other changes as well, such as the Steam installer package repository, and fixes to excessive CPU usage by the Steam client during Team Fortress 2 as well as overlay crash in Cubemen and better back navigation behavior/added discount behaviors in Big Picture.

For those who want to participate in the Steam for Linux beta program, download the most recent Steam Linux client or upgrade your current client to the latest version.

Back in October, Valve announced that it was allowing users to apply for the Steam for Linux beta. Valve said it was specifically looking for experienced users familiar with Linux and are running Ubuntu 12.04 or above. There were only 1,000 spots available in the registry.

Source: Steam



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RE: Whos still using Linux?
By drycrust3 on 12/21/2012 3:06:56 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Unity can multitask at least as well as OS X, it handles running apps in a pretty OS X-ish way.

It does multitask really well? I'm afraid I've no idea what you mean by "OS X-ish" because its so long since I've used a Mac. Does Unity let you see which apps are running, and then you can change from the one you're working on to another by simply clicking a mouse? And say you get some new email, does it alert you to this? If it does then the Unity desktop must have improved immensely since I last tried it. Can you please put a video of it doing all these things so efficiently on Youtube and then post the link here?
quote:
but you do have to step way out of your comfort zone for more than 5 minutes and get used to something different which is what a lot of people isn't willing to do.

So ... maybe it doesn't do all the multitasking stuff one normally expects of a desktop ... can you clarify what this "something different" is? Could it be, for example, that you have to actually TYPE in words to find the program you want to run? Or "Alt-TAB" to switch programs (which is how I got RSI)? If that is so ... wouldn't that sort of sound like an inferior type of desktop compared to most modern desktops, like Gnome 2, KDE, Cinamon, Gnome 3, Gnome 3 classic, etc?
quote:
The serious problem with Unity IMO is that it's bloated, and I mean BLOATED. If it was faster I'd totally use it though.

Oh ... I see ... so when the guy asked for people to recommend a Linux Distribution people could use ... you would recommend Ubuntu even though it is "BLOATED", not user friendly (well isn't that what "get used to something different which is what a lot of people isn't willing to do" means?), get people using bad keyboard habits, and that you yourself don't use it? Well that is very helpful.


RE: Whos still using Linux?
By BrotherPointy on 12/21/2012 5:44:37 PM , Rating: 2
1. I won't post a link that's your homework, but yes, Unity at least since 12.04 does all of those.

2. It does do the multitasking stuff one normally expects of a desktop, what I mean by "something different" is the Dash. It does't *make* you type to get to a program, you can do that with the mouse just fine but unlike a menu the Dash does more than launching programs so you can't compare them. Look up Unity Lenses.

You don't have to Alt+Tab to get to another running program.

3. The bloat doesn't matter if you have a needlesly powerful computer which a lot of people today does, it just so happens I don't.

If your definition of "user friendly" is "exactly what I'm used to" then no it isn't user friendly, but my definition of user friendly is "helps the user perform his tasks without asking too much from him" and Ubuntu does that for many use cases, that most people have to get used to it first has nothing to do with it. Otherwise we can just as well say that OS X is not user friendly because it would also ask people like you to step out of the comfort zone.

I do not use Unity day to day but my use case doesn't reflect that of many other people and there is a HUGE gap between not using something and claiming it is "one of the worst desktops I have ever encountered".

I do use Unity recreatively when I have the time.

"Well that is very helpful."

More than your comments, yes.


RE: Whos still using Linux?
By drycrust3 on 12/22/2012 8:52:29 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I won't post a link that's your homework, but yes, Unity at least since 12.04 does all of those.

The videos I looked at did not show any examples of multitasking, nor did they show any evidence you could see what programs were concurrently running.


RE: Whos still using Linux?
By hughlle on 12/24/2012 7:12:38 AM , Rating: 2
Seems to me you ought to try the thing so you can at least base your argument from experience ;)


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