backtop


Print 27 comment(s) - last by TDMoses.. on Dec 21 at 12:12 PM


NHTSA's David Strickland   (Source: John F. Martin/Chevrolet)
David Strickland told The Detroit News that EDRs are "essential" for the safety of drivers

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is siding strongly with the implementation of event data recorders (EDRs) in all vehicles built after 2014, but others are still worried about the privacy of drivers.

NHTSA Administrator David Strickland told The Detroit News that EDRs are "essential" for the safety of drivers, and that he opposed the idea of having a switch that would turn the black boxes off.

"The EDR information tells us so much about what's going on with a vehicle," said Strickland. "[It will] allow us to figure out what went wrong so we can fix it or we can ask the manufacturers to fix it."

EDRs, or black boxes, collect driver data such as speed, use of a seatbelt, whether brakes were applied, etc. before and after a vehicle crash. The idea behind them is to deploy better safety measures for vehicles as well as better overall vehicle design.

While EDRs could be helpful in the case of an auto accident, some believe that driver privacy is at stake. For instance, auto insurance company AAA voiced concerns about privacy recently.


"Congress needs to ensure motorist rights are protected by passing legislation that prohibits access to data without permission from the owner or from a court order, unless the data is used for research purposes and cannot be tracked to a single vehicle," said Robert Darbelnet, president and CEO of AAA.

Strickland responded to such claims, saying the EDRs "don't track people" and "don't record (at all times)."

Earlier this month, the White House Office of Management Budget finally completed its review of the NHTSA's EDR proposal to boost the number of new vehicles with EDRs from 91.6 percent today to 100 percent of light-duty cars and trucks. The White House delayed its review for over a year.

Some automakers already place EDRs in all of their vehicles, such as Ford, General Motors Mazda and Toyota.

Source: The Detroit News



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Yeah, Right
By mgilbert on 12/21/2012 8:05:24 AM , Rating: 2
To all you brain dead sheep that don't see a problem with this, and are saying not to break the law and you won't have a problem...

So, you NEVER exceed the posted speed limit by even one MPH? Yeah, right. And you always come to a complete stop at stop signs and before turning right on red? Yeah, I believe you, sure. And you never, ever misjudge and clip a yellow light? And you never, ever follow just a bit more closely than two seconds? Oh, and I bet you always turn you headlights on exactly thirty minutes before sunset as the law requires? Give me a break. What a bunch of self-righteous, lying a**holes! And you'll be the first ones bitching when police start monitoring your EDR, and issuing you annual or monthly speeding tickets for every second you exceed the speed limit by even one MPH.

What a bunch or arrogant, self-righteous lying pricks! STFU, or start screaming about the government abuse sure to follow the EDR mandate! You people are a bunch of totally naive idiots if you think this won't be abused by the government, and by insurance companies.




RE: Yeah, Right
By TDMoses on 12/21/2012 12:12:33 PM , Rating: 2
None of us are saying we haven't sped, we are just being adults and accept the responsibilities for whatever action we take. Grow up.


"This is about the Internet.  Everything on the Internet is encrypted. This is not a BlackBerry-only issue. If they can't deal with the Internet, they should shut it off." -- RIM co-CEO Michael Lazaridis














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki