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NHTSA's David Strickland   (Source: John F. Martin/Chevrolet)
David Strickland told The Detroit News that EDRs are "essential" for the safety of drivers

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is siding strongly with the implementation of event data recorders (EDRs) in all vehicles built after 2014, but others are still worried about the privacy of drivers.

NHTSA Administrator David Strickland told The Detroit News that EDRs are "essential" for the safety of drivers, and that he opposed the idea of having a switch that would turn the black boxes off.

"The EDR information tells us so much about what's going on with a vehicle," said Strickland. "[It will] allow us to figure out what went wrong so we can fix it or we can ask the manufacturers to fix it."

EDRs, or black boxes, collect driver data such as speed, use of a seatbelt, whether brakes were applied, etc. before and after a vehicle crash. The idea behind them is to deploy better safety measures for vehicles as well as better overall vehicle design.

While EDRs could be helpful in the case of an auto accident, some believe that driver privacy is at stake. For instance, auto insurance company AAA voiced concerns about privacy recently.


"Congress needs to ensure motorist rights are protected by passing legislation that prohibits access to data without permission from the owner or from a court order, unless the data is used for research purposes and cannot be tracked to a single vehicle," said Robert Darbelnet, president and CEO of AAA.

Strickland responded to such claims, saying the EDRs "don't track people" and "don't record (at all times)."

Earlier this month, the White House Office of Management Budget finally completed its review of the NHTSA's EDR proposal to boost the number of new vehicles with EDRs from 91.6 percent today to 100 percent of light-duty cars and trucks. The White House delayed its review for over a year.

Some automakers already place EDRs in all of their vehicles, such as Ford, General Motors Mazda and Toyota.

Source: The Detroit News



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RE: Idiots
By TDMoses on 12/20/2012 2:48:21 PM , Rating: 2
All you are saying is that you are being a child and won't take responsibility for your actions. If you speed and cause an accident, that's your fault. Suck it up.


RE: Idiots
By 91TTZ on 12/20/2012 3:27:16 PM , Rating: 2
He's saying that the insurance companies will use the data from the recorders to try to get out of paying for an accident. In his example he's going 3 over the speed limit but the speed isn't what caused the crash, the ice did. He's saying that the insurance company will ask for the telemetry data, see that he was going 3 mph over the speed limit, and then try to use that as their excuse not to pay when really it wasn't the cause of the accident.


RE: Idiots
By TDMoses on 12/20/2012 4:58:59 PM , Rating: 2
Then drive responsibly and legally, and you won't have a problem. Why do you argue? Do you feel entitled to speed? Are you above the law? If you are doing something illegal when something else goes wrong, you should be liable.

Let me pull an example from the movie Liar, Liar. Man is breaking into a house and falls on a knife. He then sues the homeowner for falling on that knife. Reality or not, I think it is a good point.

Or here is an example quite similar that I have heard cases about. A family owns a house with a pool or trampoline in their backyard, someone trespasses onto their property and gets injured and sues the family. Is that fair?


RE: Idiots
By Schrag4 on 12/21/2012 6:44:50 AM , Rating: 2
Agree 100%. Also, people seem to be missing 2 other points. The first one is that insurance companies are in the business of making money, just like everybody else. I asked it before, would you want to insure someone who speeds when there's ice on the road? If you reject my first point, you might just be thinking of yourself, and that's fine because the second point is about you. If you're insured, in the event of an accident your chances of receiving a fair payout suffers when insurance companies have to pay out to people who cause their own accidents through negligence. There's only so many insurance premium dollars to go around, it's not rocket science.


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