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Details on the next generation Tegra 4 processor, codenamed "Wayne", leak

NVIDIA has done pretty well on the mobile market with its Tegra 3 processor, and it should be of no surprise to anyone that NVIDIA has been working on the next generation Tegra processor. The company even provided some rough details early last year.
 
However, some detailed information on the next-generation 28nm Tegra 4 leaked today, and it promises six times the power of Tegra 3. Tegra 4 appears to be, according to a leaked slide, a 4+1 quad-core design similar to that of the current Tegra 3. The Cortex-A15-based Tegra 4 has 72 graphics cores and supports dual channel memory. Tegra 4 will also support resolutions of 2560 x 1440 for encode and decode and promises very low power consumption.

Other supported features will include the USB 3.0, making this the first NVIDIA chipset to support the new and faster USB standard.

With CES 2013 kicking off in mere weeks, we should have significantly more details coming in the not-too-distant future. 

Source: Engadget



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RE: Still 32-bit
By ssnova703 on 12/18/2012 12:37:55 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Desktops/Windows won't go anywhere.
You have decades worth of software/games backwards compatibility and it's also the cutting edge in terms of graphics that SoC's can't ever touch.


As the use of the "PC" becomes more defined, ARM cores shine. IE: the vast majority of people used their PC's to facebook/email/check the weather/read news.... instead of using nearly 200watts to do that, you could easily and efficiently do that with less than 10watts.

This is a big reason why the PC is rapidly declining. The saying goes, "anything you can do, I can do it better.", and that is quickly becoming the case with ARM vs X86, there are still hurdles to overcome in certain areas, but they are quickly being worked on.

Perhaps two strong arguments for the PC(among others) is legacy productivity software(engineering, rendering, photo editing, etc.) and hardcore gaming.

Yet, both are being challenged everyday as software makers make the move to ARM.


RE: Still 32-bit
By Helbore on 12/18/2012 12:59:25 PM , Rating: 3
Its happening on the other side, too, though. Intel have demonstrated Haswell ULV processors running at 8W. Intel are also moving their ATom line to the same tick-tock cycle as their mainstream processors.

I think too many people are looking at ARM and seeing it eclipsing x86. I see it going the same way as when people thought AMD was about to take Intel's crown. It looked like that until Intel hit back.

Never underestimate what Intel can do once they set their minds (and wallets) to it. The myth of "x86 can't be as power-efficient as RISC" has been dispelled. ARM is clambering up below a descending boot.


RE: Still 32-bit
By Ammohunt on 12/18/2012 1:42:39 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
instead of using nearly 200watts to do that, you could easily and efficiently do that with less than 10watts.


Think of the power savings a company with 1000's of desktop PC's could save by running something like an ARM android based Mini-PC(like a MK802 iii) for daily work coupled with Citrix or VDI for legacy applications. All in a thumb drive sized device that users could drop in their pocket to use at home on their monitor with an HDMI port beats the hell out of a laptop any day.


RE: Still 32-bit
By drewsup on 12/18/2012 2:17:18 PM , Rating: 2
most Citrix based companies already use this, little 350 Mhz terminals that the clients have buried on their desks under piles of paperwork. Not fabulous, but they get the job done.


RE: Still 32-bit
By Ammohunt on 12/19/2012 12:34:32 AM , Rating: 2
Not a fan of the graphical terminals they work but having a fully functional PC is still preferable.


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