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Print 34 comment(s) - last by Alexvrb.. on Dec 19 at 12:46 AM

Low-resolution screen support scraps HTC project

Rumors are circulating that HTC has scrapped a project that would produce a 5” or larger smartphone using the new Windows Phone 8 operating system. Apparently, HTC couldn’t justify going with the larger screen due to Microsoft’s strict screen resolution requirements.

While there are Android smartphones in that pipeline that support resolutions as high as 1080p, Microsoft has limited Windows Phone 8 to a maximum of 720p (for now).
 
According to Bloomberg’s source, HTC was looking to pick a fight with Samsung’s Galaxy Note II smartphone, which features a 720p display. By offering a 1080p competitor, HTC would have some bragging rights against Samsung’s offering. However, display parity wouldn’t do much for HTC, which has been battered in recent months in the smartphone market.

Bloomberg reports that HTC's decision will deliver a blow to Microsoft and its efforts to compete with Android in the smartphone market. Consumers wanting a large-screen smartphone will have no choice but to go with Android offerings if they are shopping from HTC. 

Source: Bloomberg



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RE: First of all...
By nafhan on 12/17/2012 11:09:29 AM , Rating: 4
Some speculation here: the screen resolution limit probably has to do with scaling and asset resolution.

Google has put a LOT of work into getting Android to scale across multiple resolutions and still look nice. I think that MS has not, and instead they are supporting a limited number of fixed resolutions. There are advantages to both approaches.
quote:
1080p on a 5" screen does nothing but ramp up the cost of the device.
The only 1080p phone I know of, the Droid DNA, is the same price as most other high end phones ($200 on contract), and the image quality is noticeably better. Not a big difference, but it's easy to see when you look at it side by side with other phones.


RE: First of all...
By Labotomizer on 12/17/2012 11:13:10 AM , Rating: 2
Next to my 8X I can't really tell the difference, other than the .7" larger. Both are incredibly sharp. Not sure how you could notice the pixels on either one. Magnifying glass?


RE: First of all...
By RufusM on 12/17/2012 12:44:53 PM , Rating: 5
This is just spec-war between the OEM phone makers. HTC wants to be the first to market to give them some differentiation and an advantage.

If Joe Schmo walks into a store it can be sold on quantitative specs: screen size, 1080p, quad-core, etc. Knowing the specs can produce placebo effects for qualitative differences when the customer knows one has inherently "more" or "better".

It can also give phone nerds something more to brag about.


RE: First of all...
By nafhan on 12/17/2012 2:32:55 PM , Rating: 2
Specifically, I was looking at a DNA next to an S3, and I could see a difference. No magnification needed. Definitely cannot see the pixels on the DNA, but depending on what I'm looking at they are sometimes clearly visible on the S3. It's not bad enough to actually bother me.

Also: 8X = 342dpi Super LCD vs. S3 = 306dpi PenTile. So, I would expect the difference between the 8X and the DNA to be less noticeable.


RE: First of all...
By Alexvrb on 12/18/2012 12:51:55 AM , Rating: 2
Of course pixel density is just one factor in how good a display is. What's funny though is that the article says 720p is the limit, but you can get a Lumia 920 with a slightly-higher 768 x 1280 resolution. I think the Ativ Odyssey will use the same resolution. I'm thinking that's the real limit, until they introduce an update and a new Chassis spec.


RE: First of all...
By Alexvrb on 12/19/2012 12:46:47 AM , Rating: 2
But let's not let facts get in the way of a good article. Right Shane? 768? Search engine?


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