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Print 49 comment(s) - last by retrospooty.. on Dec 17 at 1:55 PM

Victory gives Windows Phone and Android maker bargaining leverage and possibly a damages payout

Apple, Inc. (AAPL) has lost an important, but under publicized patent infringement jury trial regarding its iPhone.  The trial was held in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware, a jurisdiction that is viewed as plaintiff friendly (much like East Texas) and hence tends to attract patent litigation.

The jury in the Wilmington, Delaware court found Apple guilty of willfully infringing on three patents covering camera phones, call handling, and call rejection.  The next phase will be a damages trial with the plaintiff's attorneys already crowing that they expect a "substantial" payout from Apple.

The case was first filed in 2010 by MobileMedia Ideas LLC, and covered 14 patents.  U.S. District Judge Sue L. Robinson was initially reticent to bring the case to trial, but she agreed to this year, when the plaintiffs whittled their list down to the three most important patents.

MobileMedia Chief Executive Officer Larry Horn told Bloomberg after the news was announced, "We’re very pleased.  We think it’s justified.  We’re not in the litigation business [we just want to license]."


Oh, it might be worth mentioning that MobileMedia is co-owned by Android phonemaker Sony Corp. (TYO:6758), Windows Phone maker Nokia Oyj. (HEX:NOK1V) and MPEG LA, a company specializing in licensing video codecs.  In that regard, MobileMedia is what is called a "shell company" -- a company that does not produce anything, but which one or more companies shuffle patents to for the purpose of suing.

The patents used in the case came from Sony and Nokia.

Under current U.S. patent and contract law, often times settlements between two companies don't necessarily apply to their shell firms.  Thus Nokia, for example, can sue Apple via MobileMedia without breaching its settlement from when it directly sued Apple.  In most cases licensing settlements are written such that suing the licensed party breaches the contract.

Also by using shell firms, companies like Sony and Nokia can escape negative publicity of appearing overly litigious.

Steve Bauer, a partner at Proskauer Rose LLP -- the law firm representing the victorious plaintiffs -- wrote in an email to Bloomberg, "This was a very difficult case.  It required us to take the jury back to 1994-1998, when these technologies were first invented."

Apple has been struggling in the patent sphere of late, seeing the "Steve Jobs" multi-touch patent and the key "rubber-band" patent invalidated.  Apple also was found to have infringed on a Swiss company's protected clock design.

Sources: Bloomberg, Business Wire



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RE: All together now:
By Camikazi on 12/15/2012 7:54:49 PM , Rating: 4
Apple is in no way a victim, they like to play the victim but they are as bad and devious as any other. BTW yes, Apple did start this whole "sue for tiny unimportant ideas" game and now others know the rules and are using them against Apple. Can't call foul once others start using the rules you set in the first place.


RE: All together now:
By MartyLK on 12/15/12, Rating: -1
RE: All together now:
By Camikazi on 12/16/2012 8:17:57 AM , Rating: 3
You seem to overlook that as far as this trial is concerned it is Apple who is doing the stealing and to answer your question no I don't hate Apple. Maybe Samsung did steal their ideas at first, I will admit the phones do look similar but just cause they were a victim once does not mean they did not steal ideas and other companies property this time. Like I said they are as bad and devious as any company out there, none of them are innocent angels, they are all out to make money.


RE: All together now:
By theapparition on 12/17/2012 10:59:17 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Typical response. You hate Apple so that makes them guilty of all bad. You deliberately overlook that their Intellectual property was infringed .

Fixed that for you, as it's an important distinction.

It's quite conceivable that two separate people on other sides of the world working on a similar problem would reach the same result. This does not mean something is stolen, as no physical property is taken. The real question is if the invention is unique and non-obvious enough to be warranted patent protection. We are seeing many of their patents being dismissed.

But on this same argument, since you are so quick to believe the Samsung verdict, then be fair and believe the courts also reached a legal verdict and found Apple guilty of infringing as well.

Or in your words, Apple was found guilty for stealing other companies property.


"There's no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share. No chance." -- Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer














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