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  (Source: blogspot.com)
The rearview camera mandate would make it so every vehicle would have a backup camera for seeing behind the vehicle when in reverse

After many delays, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) is ready to begin finalizing regulation for rearview cameras in all vehicles.

DOT Secretary Ray LaHood said he is meeting with White House officials to finalize the regulations by December 31.

We have a meeting with the White House about this in the next few days so I hope that they see the importance of this the way we do," LaHood said.

The rearview camera mandate would make it so every vehicle would have a backup camera for seeing behind the vehicle when in reverse. The idea was triggered by the 300 deaths and 16,000 injuries annually caused by a driver's inability to see behind their vehicle when backing up.

Many of the injuries and death affect young children and senior citizens.

The rearview camera regulations date back to 2007, when Congress initially approved legislation to set these standards by February 28, 2011. This date was delayed to February of this year, and again to December 31.

While DOT and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) are both behind the making of these new standards, others, namely automakers, have worried that the cost of installing these cameras on each vehicle would drive the price up too high.

However, over time, the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers has met with White House officials to discuss costs in the past in order to make it work.

Just last week, the White House finished its review of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) proposal to mandate event data recorders (EDR) in all new vehicles. EDRs, also known as "black boxes," collect driver data such as speed, use of a seatbelt, whether brakes were applied, etc. before and after a vehicle crash. The idea behind them is to deploy better safety measures for vehicles as well as better overall vehicle design.




Source: The Detroit News



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RE: And
By mmp121 on 12/14/2012 9:23:04 AM , Rating: 1
Putting a rear view camera in cars does NOT make cars more secure. In fact it can cause 'tunnel vision'. The driver is only aware of the field of view of the camera. Turning your head will give the driver a much better field of view.

Also, this article mentions nothing about ultra sonic sensors, which actually may work better than the camera.


RE: And
By MadMan007 on 12/14/2012 9:42:14 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah this seems like too much. Not to mention that it requires a screen in every vehicle? Maybe the economy of scale will decrease that cost somewhat but I don't need or want to pay for a screen in my car (even if it's only $500) and all the complexity it adds.

A set of ultrasonic sensors would do just as well to warn of close objects and is much less complex. In some ways it is even better, it can give distances which would be pretty handy in tight maneuvers.


RE: And
By abraxas1 on 12/14/2012 10:00:46 AM , Rating: 2
I agree with the sensors being mandatory. That's got to be a lot more cost effective. Having that system in place would also make it easier to eventually tie it into the auto parking system.

Something should definitely be mandatory on the big SUVs and Trucks. Those things have HUGE blind spots about a foot from the bumper. I've got a 2001 Ford F150 4x4 and I have to be extremely cautious when backing out in the neighborhood when the kids are out or when in a crowded parking lot.

Unfortunately if cameras are the standard they'll probably be paired with those tiny little LCDs in the rear view mirror. I think the cameras are only truly useful if you pair it with a decent sized LCD. Typically the ones you find with the navigation systems.


RE: And
By V-Money on 12/14/2012 4:03:51 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
A set of ultrasonic sensors would do just as well to warn of close objects and is much less complex. In some ways it is even better, it can give distances which would be pretty handy in tight maneuvers.


I agree 100%. On my last car I had a backup camera and the sensors and the sensors are a lot more useful. I've never hit anything but I had come close a couple times when I first tried using the camera (I fogured, might as well use the technology), but when the beeping started (from the sensors) I rechecked the screen and realized that a 2d screen is a horrible idea because without depth you sometimes miss things. Since then I only use the screen as a supplement, its good for seeing things you might not see over your shoulder, but the sensors are much more useful as it doesn't distract you from looking.


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