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Young Sohn
Samsung exec shows Apple some love

Samsung and Apple definitely have an awkward relationship. Samsung is one of Apple's top suppliers for components in its popular iPad and iPhone mobile devices. However, Apple is currently embroiled in a bitter "thermonuclear war" with Samsung over claims that the South Korean electronics giant has ripped of its patented designs and technology.
 
Despite the fact that Apple is looking to have numerous Samsung products banned from the market, it was revealed that Samsung President and Chief Strategy Officer Young Sohn actually has quite a bit of love for Apple and its products in an interview with MIT Technology Review. Sohn praised Apple tie-ins like iCloud, stating, "If you look at the strengths of Apple, in a way it’s not the product per se. It’s that consumers like their ecosystem such as iCloud. I like that my family 6,000 miles away in Korea is able to see my schedule and see all of my contacts and photos."
 
Sohn went on to state that he not only uses a Mac at home, but he also has an iPhone and an iPad. Being that Sohn is a high-ranking executive at Samsung, he naturally also owns a Samsung Galaxy smartphone (Sohn joined Samsung in August, so we can only assume that he's sporting a Galaxy S III).
 
Puzzled by the admission of a person in his position using Apple products, interviewer Jessica Laber asked for an explanation. Sohn responded:
 
At work I’m using Samsung devices; Apple at home, mainly because all of my systems and files are done that way. That’s sticky, you know? However, I did figure out how to sync all of my contacts and all of my schedules between the two different systems. You can do it. It’s a bit of work, but it is possible.
 
We're sure that the top brass at Samsung aren't exactly thrilled that Sohn is extolling his love for Apple products in an interview, especially considering that the company makes comparable devices to all of the ones that he uses at home. But it's nice to see a high-level exec keeping an open mind about the competition.

Source: MIT Technology Review



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Funny.
By retrospooty on 12/13/2012 11:24:49 AM , Rating: 5
This is all over the internet as if its a big deal that he said something nice about a competitor. Anyone rational could look at both platforms and see that Apples strength is the ecosystem/apps, as well as fast hardware specs. There should be nothing wrong with pointing that out.

Android has its good points as well. To me Androids good points far outweigh Apple's but if I didnt care about larger screens, higher res, SD card, removable battery, etc etc and was into mainly games, Apple would certainly be the best bet.

Sadly, he probably will catch flak for saying that though.




RE: Funny.
By ChronoReverse on 12/13/2012 11:36:39 AM , Rating: 5
If anything it makes Samsung stronger for it to have execs willing to be that broadminded.


RE: Funny.
By Mr Perfect on 12/13/2012 12:44:46 PM , Rating: 4
Exactly. You have to have an intimate understanding of the competitors offerings. I remember a past DT article when Bill Gates made a comment that no Apple device would ever enter his house, no matter that those where the devices his kids wanted. So how has Zune and Windows Phone been doing? Oh, wait...


RE: Funny.
By mlambert890 on 12/15/2012 12:18:48 AM , Rating: 1
First, you can bet your ass that Apple has the same policy and I know for a fact that Google does too. They hand out Android phones to everyone and *strongly* discourage use of the iPhone. So lets not pretend this is some crazy concept or limited to Bill Gates

Second... maybe "knowing your competitors product" so well is what landed Samsung in court to begin with. The whole point of the lawsuit is that they are infringing on Apples design... Now you have a SENIOR EXEC telling MIT "oh yeah, i LOVE IOS!"

The lawyers must want to kill this guy. It was a *Very* bad move for an exec and will hurt him. Many commenters seem to be too naive about how business works to understand it.


RE: Funny.
By maugrimtr on 12/17/2012 10:30:57 AM , Rating: 2
No company has the right to determine what their employees use at home, "strong discouragement" aside (whatever the heck that means - emails from the CEO extolling their products' virtues to employees?).


RE: Funny.
By chang3d on 12/13/2012 5:20:39 PM , Rating: 2
Steve Wozniak loves WP8 too. Why would this be any different?


RE: Funny.
By MartyLK on 12/13/2012 6:08:42 PM , Rating: 1
The Woz is the coolest, kindest, most decent tech geek that ever existed. He's the one that actually created Apple. He was the hardware guru behind Apple's innovation and technology.

Wozniak loves Android also. And WP8, itself, is a sweet system. It's just featureless and associated with idiots who have no clue or don't care what is good or not.

MS, in WinMo, had an excellent Maps & nav app with Bing. I used it well on my WinMo 6.5-equipped HTC HD2. It even impressed my nephew who was riding with me on one occasion of using it. The Bing maps app was every bit as good as Google Maps, at that time.

Then MS launches a whole new system to compete with Apple and everyone is abuzz with ideas of WP7 being the system to have for over-the-top functionality and features. I know I couldn't wait to get my HTC HD7 and enjoy an improved Bing Maps & nav app.

Guess what? Not only did WP7 not have a maps app like WinMo had, but there were very few other features. As the days of using WP7 went on, the dumb-foundedness of disappointment with WP7 didn't end.

And to add insult to injury, MS never stood behind the system. It was widely accepted that MS would *quickly* resolve all of the lacking'ness of WP7. And any updates would happen like the Apple variety do - without interference from the carriers. It was later discovered that MS never intended to bypass the carriers for update process. They were just rumor-milling the idea to try to hype people into adopting WP7.

The Woz may like WP8, but that won't help it. It's a fine system tied to idiots who are more like monkeys humping a football for lack of knowing what else to do with it.


RE: Funny.
By TakinYourPoints on 12/13/2012 7:05:32 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
And to add insult to injury, MS never stood behind the system. It was widely accepted that MS would *quickly* resolve all of the lacking'ness of WP7. And any updates would happen like the Apple variety do - without interference from the carriers. It was later discovered that MS never intended to bypass the carriers for update process. They were just rumor-milling the idea to try to hype people into adopting WP7.

The Woz may like WP8, but that won't help it. It's a fine system tied to idiots who are more like monkeys humping a football for lack of knowing what else to do with it.


I hate that I agree with this so much. :( WP does so many things right, some better than any mobile platform out there, but drops the ball in other very deep and fundamental ways. I've been "wait and see, this is actually awesome!" since WP7 was released but they sure are taking their sweet time...


RE: Funny.
By MartyLK on 12/13/12, Rating: 0
RE: Funny.
By MartyLK on 12/13/2012 6:15:51 PM , Rating: 2
By the way, when I say the Woz actually created Apple, I mean he was the force behind it being Apple. Jobs was the one who technically created the Apple identity and managed the business end of it. But Woz made the hardware and everything Apple was about at the time - which basically was kits and such.


RE: Funny.
By MartyLK on 12/13/2012 4:57:23 PM , Rating: 2
I just don't see the positive eco-system being talked about with Apple. My experience with Android has shown me a system that is perfectly integrated with the most ease and clarity of function.

Having my iPhone, I never really understood what was taking place in order to retrieve all of my contacts and other info. In fact, I recall my iPhone 4 being joined with the current phone I was to get contacts and other data transferred to it. With the Apple system, I didn't know where it was coming from or where it was actually at. With Android, I can clearly and easily understand the process of my info's location and state. A simple login brings it all back to me no matter what Android phone I use. It's all in one, fully apparent location - anything associated with my Google ID.

Apple's system is vague and undefined compared to Android. I think maybe it's not having everything tied to a UID like Android has is what makes it less user-friendly.

Google having Gmail and everything tied to that UID is what makes it so easy. Apple has, what, UID@iCloud.com? What the Hell is that? Is that an email address just as easy and universal to use as Gmail? I never used it that way. I couldn't open a particular app and sign in with my Apple UID and have everything associated with that UID. In Android, I can.


RE: Funny.
By retrospooty on 12/13/2012 5:27:13 PM , Rating: 2
I agree with you, but you and I aren't normal people, we are the type of people that visit tech sites on the internet LOL.

Most people don't want to know what is going on or just dont care. For people that don't know anything about the tech involved, or just don't care the iPhone is a great ecosystem.


RE: Funny.
By TakinYourPoints on 12/13/2012 5:29:57 PM , Rating: 2
It doesn't sound like you're doing it right. Things like contacts and scheduling automatically propagate between my iPhone/iPad/Mac/PC with no problems. There is a centralized UID, iCloud, and it is brain-dead simple to use.

I also use Google's UID for GMail/Drive/Chrome, and it also works great, but I wouldn't say it is either any easier or more difficult to use.


RE: Funny.
By MartyLK on 12/13/2012 5:48:37 PM , Rating: 2
I don't know. Maybe the Apple process got better with iOS6. But I do know it was at best, vague, when I was using my i4.

Okay, thinking a little bit back at the iPhone situation, I have - I think - an example:

My iTunes account is associated with a particular POP email address. And it isn't an "iCloud" address. I could not punch in my iTunes ID, which has all of my purchased apps and music, and have ready access to everything associate with Apple's centralized UID - "iCloud".

In Android, any apps or games or music or anything I've bought is associated with the Gmail UID. The whole universe is associated with the Gmail UID.


RE: Funny.
By mlambert890 on 12/15/2012 12:00:47 AM , Rating: 2
Things changed with iCloud.

Android is fine as long as you want to surrender your entire existence to Google. Yes of course if you use Android (their OS), the Android app store (their app store), Google Music (their music service), GMail (their mail app) and every other thing they do, then yes it works great.

Similarly if you do everything with Apple resources then everything Apple works great too.

The point is that as soon as you don't want to surrender your entire existence to any one of these ecosystems, they *all* break down. You dont feel it because you are happily 100% Google. 100% Apple people dont feel it because they are 100% Apple. There really is no difference beyond the perception of individual "fans".

Its ironic that Google and Apple are busily creating *far* more "lock in" than MSFT ever did and continually get not only a free pass, but really kudos for building such "well integrated environments". The #1 and #2 dominators of the largest growth segment in computing each having total monopoly control of the entire stack really isnt a great thing, but no one seems to care anymore.


RE: Funny.
By mlambert890 on 12/15/2012 12:06:19 AM , Rating: 2
And before anyone splits hairs.. Yes I realize that "Android" isnt "Google" but for all intents and purposes it really is. The hardware OEM partners provide device diversity, and *technically* it is "open" and "open source", but in practice this is Googles playground and, again excepting the device diversity, is just as much of a centrally controlled walled garden as IOS is for the vast majority of users.


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