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Print 76 comment(s) - last by Insurgence.. on Dec 14 at 8:07 PM

Notorious spammer claims net neutrality applies to spam

Jason Flanary (R), chief operating officer at ccAdvertising -- a company specializing in political text message spam – turned heads during the last presidential election by sending unsolicited messages to smartphones with statements like, "Obama believes killing children is a right until the umbilical cord is cut."

While Mr. Flanary was disappointed to lose his own election bid for the Virginia state senate [source] amid the controversy that ensued, he's now pushing ahead on an even more ambitious effort.  He's asked the U.S. Federal Communications Commission to either whitelist political spam (or "political messages" as he views it) or to declare spam in general protected free speech.

Either way, he argues, it should be illegal for private businesses to block or discriminate against using filters traffic they consider "spam".

In the wake of the ccAdvertising text campaign many carriers began to block his company's messages, recognizing that their customers did not want the unsolicited and often times unwelcome texts.  But in doing so Mr. Flanary claims they broke the law.

Jason Flanary
Jason Flanary is among the Republicans breaking with part ranks to voice support for net neutrality, arguing it should be expanded to protect political spam.
[Image Source: FairFax Patch]

His stand is unusual as in the past most federal Republicans contended that net neutrality was an abusive expansion of federal power and intrusion on free market.  Now it appears that at least some Republicans may be changing their mind, looking to leverage the FCC policy to their advantage.

If you want to respond to Mr. Flanary's claim that political text message spam is protected free speech, the FCC welcomes public comments here.  Be aware, you must give your real name and address.

Sources: FCC [filing], [comments], DailyKos



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RE: But technically, isn't he right?
By Nutzo on 12/13/2012 12:05:50 AM , Rating: 3
Agreed.

Until a few month ago I didn't have a text plan, and would get charged for this unwanted spam. My only recourse was to block ALL messages, which ment I couldn't get the few messages I actually wanted.

This is no different that Faxes, where it costs the receiver money to receive a fax (paper/ink).

Unsolicited SMS messages should be illegal, with $$ penalties applied to people who send them.


By Insurgence on 12/14/2012 8:07:16 PM , Rating: 2
It's not only effecting cost by SMS texts, but also by impact on network bandwidth/usage and time. As a result many companies have to spend money on additional equipment to compensate for that bandwidth loss, and to filter out the spam to reduce the impact.

All while the only thing the spammer pays is his internet bill.


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