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Apple CEO Tim Cook  (Source: siliconbeat.com)
He said it's important to create jobs both abroad and in the U.S.

In an extensive interview with Businessweek, which was released today, Apple CEO Tim Cook confirmed that some Mac production would be moved to the United States in 2013.

Earlier this week, a report from CNN Money revealed an iMac purchase with the label "Computer Assembled in USA" on it. A reader by the name Aaron Gong had bought the 21-inch iMac in a San Jose, California Apple Store just last weekend.

However, another iMac buyer purchased the same unit at the Manhattan Apple Store last week, and it had the expected "Assembled in China" label. Clearly, Apple wasn't moving all Mac production to the U.S., but it sparked some speculation.

Now, Cook said himself that some Mac production will, indeed, make its way to the U.S. next year. He also noted that other parts, such as the iPhone's processor, is from the United States as well (Texas, to be exact).

"It’s not known well that the engine for the iPhone and iPad is made in the U.S., and many of these are also exported—the engine, the processor," said Cook in the interview. "The glass is made in Kentucky. And next year we are going to bring some production to the U.S. on the Mac. We’ve been working on this for a long time, and we were getting closer to it. It will happen in 2013. We’re really proud of it."

Businessweek further asked what it meant for an American company like Apple to be "patriotic." In other words, how important is it to bring production to the U.S. despite it being cheaper overseas?

"I do feel we have a responsibility to create jobs," said Cook. "I don’t think we have a responsibility to create a certain kind of job, but I think we do have a responsibility to create jobs. I think we have a responsibility to give back to the communities, to pick ways that we can do that … and not just in the U.S., but abroad as well.

"I’ve never thought a company’s measurement of job creation should be limited to the number of employees working directly for them. That’s a very old-time way of measuring. Our iOS platform allows developers to work as entrepreneurs and sell their applications to a worldwide market that didn’t exist previously. The mobile software industry was nascent before the iPhone. Now you’ve got hundreds of thousands of developers out there.

"Unlike other companies—at least I know of no other large companies—almost all of our R&D is sitting in California. It’s a part of our model. We do this because it’s important for people to run into each other and discuss ideas and collaborate. We’re building a multibillion-dollar headquarters to house them in what we think will be the center of creativity. We’re building a campus in Austin for people in Texas. We’re building three data centers—adding to the one we have in Maiden [N.C.] and establishing new sites in Oregon and in Nevada."

Source: Businessweek



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RE: Apple sucks
By Uncle on 12/6/2012 5:13:17 PM , Rating: 1
"the product line which is most likely to be made in the US will be the new Mac Pro" I say this without malice. It reads like your going to be at the end of that five block line up waiting to get your hands on that USA produced Mac Pro when it comes out.


"Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment -- same piece of hardware -- paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be." -- Steve Ballmer

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