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Apple CEO Tim Cook  (Source: siliconbeat.com)
He said it's important to create jobs both abroad and in the U.S.

In an extensive interview with Businessweek, which was released today, Apple CEO Tim Cook confirmed that some Mac production would be moved to the United States in 2013.

Earlier this week, a report from CNN Money revealed an iMac purchase with the label "Computer Assembled in USA" on it. A reader by the name Aaron Gong had bought the 21-inch iMac in a San Jose, California Apple Store just last weekend.

However, another iMac buyer purchased the same unit at the Manhattan Apple Store last week, and it had the expected "Assembled in China" label. Clearly, Apple wasn't moving all Mac production to the U.S., but it sparked some speculation.

Now, Cook said himself that some Mac production will, indeed, make its way to the U.S. next year. He also noted that other parts, such as the iPhone's processor, is from the United States as well (Texas, to be exact).

"It’s not known well that the engine for the iPhone and iPad is made in the U.S., and many of these are also exported—the engine, the processor," said Cook in the interview. "The glass is made in Kentucky. And next year we are going to bring some production to the U.S. on the Mac. We’ve been working on this for a long time, and we were getting closer to it. It will happen in 2013. We’re really proud of it."

Businessweek further asked what it meant for an American company like Apple to be "patriotic." In other words, how important is it to bring production to the U.S. despite it being cheaper overseas?

"I do feel we have a responsibility to create jobs," said Cook. "I don’t think we have a responsibility to create a certain kind of job, but I think we do have a responsibility to create jobs. I think we have a responsibility to give back to the communities, to pick ways that we can do that … and not just in the U.S., but abroad as well.

"I’ve never thought a company’s measurement of job creation should be limited to the number of employees working directly for them. That’s a very old-time way of measuring. Our iOS platform allows developers to work as entrepreneurs and sell their applications to a worldwide market that didn’t exist previously. The mobile software industry was nascent before the iPhone. Now you’ve got hundreds of thousands of developers out there.

"Unlike other companies—at least I know of no other large companies—almost all of our R&D is sitting in California. It’s a part of our model. We do this because it’s important for people to run into each other and discuss ideas and collaborate. We’re building a multibillion-dollar headquarters to house them in what we think will be the center of creativity. We’re building a campus in Austin for people in Texas. We’re building three data centers—adding to the one we have in Maiden [N.C.] and establishing new sites in Oregon and in Nevada."

Source: Businessweek



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RE: Has it come full circle already?
By ClownPuncher on 12/6/2012 1:08:16 PM , Rating: 3
The US has always been a profitable place to manufacture goods. Not always the most profitable, but we do manufacture almost as much stuff as China does.


RE: Has it come full circle already?
By semiconshawn on 12/6/2012 1:10:21 PM , Rating: 3
No way. Maybe as much variety. No where close to volume.


By semiconshawn on 12/6/2012 1:11:35 PM , Rating: 1
nowhere


RE: Has it come full circle already?
By ClownPuncher on 12/6/2012 1:27:35 PM , Rating: 2
The US is the second largest manufacturing country in the world, only a few % behind China. It wasn't until 2008-2009 that China even passed us. They are growing much much more quickly than we are, however.


By Argon18 on 12/6/2012 2:32:32 PM , Rating: 1
The only reason the US and Chinese manufacturing numbers are even close right now, is that if you look at the graph, we're at the intersection point of two lines. And China's line is climbing a whole lot faster than ours. A whole lot.

Communist China is the new world Superpower, and we're the ones who funded their rise. Every time you go down to Wall Mart or Best Buy and load your cart with hundreds of dollars of "Made in China" you are funding the rise of a Communist regime - one that has a military four times the size of ours, and nuclear weapon capability. Think about that for a moment...


RE: Has it come full circle already?
By semiconshawn on 12/6/2012 4:42:53 PM , Rating: 2
Everyone makes everything in Asia. Yes we make more "valuable" stuff so if you make 1 car it counts as 7,000,000 toy skate boards. But in the context of who manufactures "more" stuff it is not close.


By ClownPuncher on 12/6/2012 4:54:40 PM , Rating: 2
You got me, bud. They make more toy skateboards than we do. I'm sure their mother will be very proud.


By semiconshawn on 12/6/2012 4:56:42 PM , Rating: 2
Think China is reporting reliable numbers? Currency value. Military manufacturing volumes and capacities. Which is more 1000 $10mil tanks or 10,000 $1mil tanks? Same manufacturing "value" not the same manufacturing.


By melgross on 12/6/2012 2:26:59 PM , Rating: 2
In terms of dollar value, we're pretty close. It was the recession that allowed China to move to first.


RE: Has it come full circle already?
By bobsmith1492 on 12/6/2012 1:26:04 PM , Rating: 2
We manufacture more capital-intensive, expensive, high-margin stuff. China does more low-margin, labor-intensive manufacturing. I.E. cars in the US, clothes in China.


RE: Has it come full circle already?
By Argon18 on 12/6/2012 2:26:25 PM , Rating: 2
Where did you get that bollocks idea from? Heavy industry and large machinery is where the manufacturing shift to China *began*. We're talking large industrial machines with 6 and 7 and 8 figure price tags. In fact, so much heavy manufacturing capability has moved to China, there are certain things now where China is the *only* source for them. You can't get them from the USA any more, because there is no more capability to make them here.

The Chinese are already driving their own domestic cars. Its only a matter of time before Chinese cars make their way to the US. You will see them on US roads within this decade, and they're going to cost a LOT less than anything else out there.


By StanO360 on 12/6/2012 4:20:51 PM , Rating: 3
Just not true, they may make some of that, but it is not their bread and butter. Chips, machinery, turbines, planes. You are partly right.

Nevertheless, the less labor intensive, or less skilled, the greater advantage China has. China drives their own cars, only because they force it, and many if not most are made by first world companies. Look up the show on the BMW plant in South Carolina (I think), the Chinese will have a difficult time competing with that. Minimum employees, maximum technology and efficiency. Things that are only accomplished in an efficient society, which China is not (it is merely subsidized).


RE: Has it come full circle already?
By Apone on 12/10/2012 1:23:47 PM , Rating: 2
Not sure what business class you ever took but one of a firm's primary objectives in business is to maximize revenue/profit and minimize costs (Business 101). This is why it's been common practice for the longest time for companies to send manufacturing jobs overseas (with the exception of the autmotive industry, etc.) as the reduction in costs (generally) leads to added value back to the company shareholders and owners.

You also have to consider that even though manufucturing is profitable in the United States, American labor is still super expensive which is another reason why manufacturing is done overseas.


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