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  (Source: newenglandpost.com)
The Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) is expected to be the most advanced energy storage research program in the U.S.

Argonne National Lab is jump-starting a new Batteries and Energy Storage Hub that is expected to significantly advance battery technology for vehicles and the grid. 

The Batteries and Energy Storage Hub, which will be known as the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR), is expected to be the most advanced energy storage research program in the U.S. It will offer the data needed for scientists to make huge strides in the energy sector. 

JCESR, which is ran by Argonne National Lab Senior Scientist George W. Crabtree, was chosen for a $120 million award over a five-year period. With this money, it'll bring together the efforts of other independent research programs for new battery advances.

More specifically, the advancements will focus on transportation and the grid. As far as transportation goes, research and development will work on increasing the electric range for vehicle batteries. On the grid side, increasing storage capabilities for energy-producing mediums like wind, solar and hydropower will improve efficiency and flexibility. 

This new hub falls in line with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) plan to focus 2013 spending on electric vehicles and grid modernization.

Source: Energy.gov



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RE: Better late than never
By Mint on 12/6/2012 10:35:49 AM , Rating: 2
As I already explained, the market needs are quite different. For car batteries, the main figure of merit is (cycles * kWh)/price. The better that is, the more mileage there will be over which to amortize its cost. Initial cost alone is only relevant to short sighted consumers. Lease rates take into account the higher residual value of a car with a good battery.

For cell phones, energy density is king. Once you hit 1000 cycles, there's no market incentive to do better.


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