backtop


Print 48 comment(s) - last by CarbonJoe.. on Dec 5 at 11:39 AM

Rear screen projection TVs are dead

Mitsubishi has announced the end of its rear projection screen TVs. For many years if you had big-screen TV, it was typically a rear projection style unit. As pricing on LCD and plasma TV sets came down and screen sizes increased, consumer interest in rear projection TVs waned.

Mitsubishi was the last manufacturer producing these relics from the past, but the company has informed its authorized service centers 73-inch, 82-inch, and 92-inch DLP projection TVs will be discontinued.

Mitsubishi Electrical Visual Solutions America (MEVSA) president and CEO Junichi Nose stated that the change was part of an "important change in business direction, which will necessitate a corresponding restructuring of the MEVSA organization."

MESVA's Max Wasinger added, "We are in the midst of an orderly exit from the DLP TV business. MEVSA will now focus on B-to-B (projectors, display wall, printers, digital signage, monitors, etc.) and the home theater projector business."

Mitsubishi's line of projection screen TVs were far from inexpensive. The 75-inch LaserVue TV sold for about $4,000 at retail locations around the country. 

Source: CE Pro



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Poor example....
By Schrag4 on 12/3/2012 2:18:18 PM , Rating: 2
I agree completely. I've never understood why rear proj DLPs aren't more popular. Sure, it's practically impossible to hang them on a wall, but a screen 60 inches or larger is probably part of a home theatre, which will have other deep components, like a place to put an A/V receiver, subwoofer, front speakers, etc.

If you don't have those things, or you do but they take up very little room, then I hate to break it to you but you don't have a real home theatre. It might sound good, even great, but I doubt you realize what you're missing. I've always said that for total immersion, a good picture is FAR less important than huge, clear sound.

For the record, I don't currently have a decent sound system either, but I know what one should look and sound like. The blu-ray player with the built-in amp and 5.1 speakers sound pretty good in the small room they're in, but the system is an order of magnitude below what a decent home theatre system should sound like.

All this to say, someday, when I finally put together a real home theatre, my preferred display will be a rear-proj DLP, assuming they're still being made.


RE: Poor example....
By Mint on 12/3/2012 7:53:13 PM , Rating: 2
It's mainly the allure of the flat panel form factor.

But even with picture quality, there are ANSI contrast problems of rear projection due to reflection inside the cabinet of the bright sections. DLP was always the best of rear projections for this, but I've only seen ~400:1 ANSI constrast measured, with ultra high contrast numbers only happening with a black screen. That really take a lot of punch out of the picture compared to 1000:1 contrast LCDs and much better still from plasmas.

Of course, none of this would matter if priced didn't drop for flat panels. It blows my mind that we can create a 60" panel with 6 million subpixels (i.e. filled with ~200 micron features) at a cost that can compete in price with a hollow plastic cabinet using a 1" DLP imaging chip. I saw 60" LCDs going for $700 on Black Friday. That's insane!

To put that in perspective, if the the TV lasts 5 years, it would take only 1% of a minimum wage salary to finance a 60" flat-panel.


RE: Poor example....
By TakinYourPoints on 12/3/2012 9:50:30 PM , Rating: 2
Being able to hang other types of displays have nothing to do with anything. Rear projection DLPs have inferior color accuracy, contrast, rendering of motion, and viewing angles to a plasma, and these are problems that will never be addressed.


“Then they pop up and say ‘Hello, surprise! Give us your money or we will shut you down!' Screw them. Seriously, screw them. You can quote me on that.” -- Newegg Chief Legal Officer Lee Cheng referencing patent trolls











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki