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Print 68 comment(s) - last by alcalde.. on Dec 8 at 1:17 AM

A "Computer Assembled in USA" sticker made its way onto an iMac purchased this weekend

Apple may be assembling certain hardware in the United States instead of China, according to a recent CNN Money report. 

The report referred to a reader, Aaron Gong, that purchased a new 21-inch iMac at an Apple Store in San Jose, California last weekend. When he opened the box, the label said "Computer Assembled in USA" rather than China, which is normally the case. 

This is a bit of an odd case, though, since the iMac was an in-stock, entry-level model that had no custom specifications at all. In the past, only "made-to-order" iMacs were assembled in the U.S. 

This doesn't mean that Apple is moving all of its hardware -- or even just iMac -- manufacturing the U.S. Another 21-inch iMac buyer purchased his product at the Manhattan Apple Store last week and had an "Assembled in China" label on it. 

It's not clear what's going on with Apple's assembly locations, but Gong's Saturday iMac purchase has certainly raised a few questions. 

Apple's gadgets are mainly manufactured and assembled at its Foxconn plants in China, but these plants have had several issues this year ranging from poor working conditions to employee abuse in the way of excessive overtime, crowded dorms, and low pay. 

Source: CNN



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Gotta love the way with words...
By quiksilvr on 12/3/2012 2:48:46 PM , Rating: 3
Assembled in, manufactured in, designed in, conceptualized in. We have so many fun and unique ways to hide the fact that 80% (if not more) of the device was made overseas.




RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By Nortel on 12/3/2012 3:42:49 PM , Rating: 3
The devices themselves are 100% designed in the USA. Foxconn has to throw some chips together, mill some cases and essentially follow the design provided by Apple. If Apple is providing final assembly in the USA, why bash them for creating jobs in the USA? Damned if you do, damned if you don't.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By JediJeb on 12/3/2012 4:04:06 PM , Rating: 5
I remember a story about Toyota shipping over Camry's that were missing only a couple pieces(like wipers or trim) and calling them "automotive parts" then sending them to a plant in the US where the missing part was installed and then the car was labeled as "Assembled in USA".

Just one of the ways large companies avoid paying taxes and tariffs, and if fixed could probably bring in more revenue to the government than we could ever raise by making the rich "pay their fair share."


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By Flunk on 12/4/2012 12:25:43 AM , Rating: 2
No, it wouldn't bring in any where near as much as making the rich pay at even the same percentage as everyone else. Tarifs are just a tiny drop in the bucket compared to the huge cash cow that income taxes are.

You are right about the Toyota scam though, they did do that. Although they have changed and a lot of their cars are actually assembled in the USA and quite a few parts are made there too. That's why I drive a Mazda.


By someguy123 on 12/4/2012 1:39:18 AM , Rating: 2
The hell are you talking about? Personal income taxes for those legally living in the US is much higher as you go up the income bracket. top 10% pay 70% of all taxes, and the top 50% pay nearly all taxes according to the IRS at 97.75%.


By Just Tom on 12/4/2012 10:25:43 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
I remember a story about Toyota shipping over Camry's that were missing only a couple pieces(like wipers or trim) and calling them "automotive parts" then sending them to a plant in the US where the missing part was installed and then the car was labeled as "Assembled in USA".


Except that would be illegal. The law is pretty clear, from the BCP "A product that includes foreign components may be called "Assembled in USA" without qualification when its principal assembly takes place in the U.S. and the assembly is substantial. For the "assembly" claim to be valid, the product’s last "substantial transformation" also should have occurred in the U.S. That’s why a "screwdriver" assembly in the U.S. of foreign components into a final product at the end of the manufacturing process doesn’t usually qualify for the "Assembled in USA" claim.
"

A car coming over from Japan with just its wipers or trim missing is still a car. Labelling it "Assembled in USA" would violate the law.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By Argon18 on 12/3/12, Rating: -1
RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By Tony Swash on 12/3/12, Rating: -1
RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By retrospooty on 12/3/2012 7:32:14 PM , Rating: 3
Or maybe, just maybe one should entertain the possibility that they are being voted down for the obvious bias and/or ridiculous comments made.

Note, the original comment by Nortel (below) wasnt voted down, as it didn't contain any idiocy or falsities. In fact it was voted up to 3 as of the time I post this. Maybe it isnt an anti-apple thing, its just an Anti-ridiculous thing. See how Nortel was voted up and Argon and you were both voted down? Now re-read all 3 and see of you can figure it out. =)

"The devices themselves are 100% designed in the USA. Foxconn has to throw some chips together, mill some cases and essentially follow the design provided by Apple. If Apple is providing final assembly in the USA, why bash them for creating jobs in the USA? Damned if you do, damned if you don't."


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By RetroLooser on 12/3/2012 9:22:31 PM , Rating: 1
Seriously, please put down the joystick and go play with that Justin Bieber blow-up doll you have.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By shanomacadaemia on 12/4/2012 5:46:19 AM , Rating: 2
"RetroLooser" <-- love this. It sounds like a pair of trendy jeans from 1999. And they say there's an education crisis...

"go play with that Justin Bieber blow-up doll you have"
Does he happen to be made of straw?


By Cheesew1z69 on 12/4/2012 3:14:00 PM , Rating: 2
Don't feed the Pirks troll...


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By Tony Swash on 12/3/12, Rating: -1
RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By V-Money on 12/3/2012 9:17:57 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
.... or get voted down for observing that you get voted down for mentioning voting down :o


I think you must have missed the memo T.S., the system automatically gives you a -1 rating for inappropriate or meaningless posts like swearing in your post or posting as Tony Swash. You aren't getting voted down, technology is just catching up.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By ihateu3 on 12/4/2012 1:27:54 AM , Rating: 1
Tony, realistically... You come to a website that brings news and developments to a tech oriented crowd, that is yearning for cutting edge technology, and somehow you find it surprising that Apple gets voted down? This is not a fanboy statement, its just realistic. Apple is great at marketing and business, but as far as the tech world goes, theres really nothing to see. Had we wanted to learn about running a successful business and the tricks and dirt involved, we would not be visiting dailytech. I am actually surprised that you do, this sight is for new technologies foremost.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By Tony Swash on 12/4/12, Rating: -1
By ihateu3 on 12/5/2012 2:15:29 AM , Rating: 2
Right... just because I actually find it worth my time to actually reply when I am drunk...

So, back to the point, you understood what I was getting at, but came back with insults rather than arguments. What I originally said was not answered, but sidestepped in effort to ignore the original post. GD, are you not only an Apple fanboy but also a politician?

For arguments sake, Steve Job was a scary dirty hippie, that almost had the cops called on him when he applied at Atari. So why would a few grammar mistakes even be of any relevance to what I stated?

I guess I could be the next genius right?


By mcnabney on 12/4/2012 9:43:51 AM , Rating: 2
I'm not a fan of Apple in any way, but they have been pushing the densities of displays up for quite some time. The industry didn't move that way, Apple forced the issue.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By dark matter on 12/3/2012 6:24:02 PM , Rating: 2
Apple designed ALL of their chips, and ALL of their circuit boards??? I don't think so.

Pretty sure the Memory chips are Samsung designed.

Pretty sure that the screens were also designed outside the USA.

But hey, why let facts spoil your 100%.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By Nortel on 12/3/12, Rating: -1
By menting on 12/3/2012 9:42:26 PM , Rating: 2
i'm pretty sure Samsung designed the resisters and capacitors.
They didn't invent resisters and capacitors, but they certainly designed how it was to be sized and laid out in the layout of the die.


By menting on 12/3/2012 9:45:45 PM , Rating: 2
forgot to add that Apple can claim to have designed the phone and maybe the PCB design (and now also the CPU), but they can't claim to have designed all the components.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By RetroLooser on 12/3/12, Rating: 0
By Cheesew1z69 on 12/5/2012 11:47:09 AM , Rating: 2
You, Pirks, create new names to mock people, yet have the audacity to tell others to get a girlfriend.

And to sit here and claim it's not you, people aren't stupid. Everyone knows it's you. You are the ONLY one who mocks people by using names that resemble the person you are mocking.

And that DT continues to allow this, is pretty pathetic as well.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By StevoLincolnite on 12/3/2012 8:19:30 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The devices themselves are 100% designed in the USA.


Not exactly, Apple doesn't design allot of chips or screens. That's all done overseas.


By messele on 12/4/2012 2:15:47 AM , Rating: 3
But then neither the Chinese or South Koreans invented the technology that goes into the components. You have to look to Japan, the US and the UK where these things were invented.

I hear people bleat on about Samsung but their major skills are in fabrication and cheap mass production and that's where their r&d is focussed.


By Noonecares on 12/4/2012 8:41:20 PM , Rating: 2
The parts are designed in America, and that's it. They are made elsewhere. I wonder who makes the chips... or the lcd panel. Hrmm.. would you rather have an item assembled overseas for 1.50 an hour? Or have it assembled in the U.S. for whatever the minimum wage is?

I love Apple's marketing and advertising team. You have to admit they do a damn good job.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By Jeffk464 on 12/3/2012 4:16:29 PM , Rating: 2
There is pretty much only one component in a computer that's made in the USA and that's your intel cpu. Everything else comes from Japan, China, and S Korea. Interesting I was listening to an expert on China on NPR. He was saying that if a computer costs $1000 probably only $100 goes to china, the rest goes to the more expensive parts from Japan, Korea, Intel, and of course profit for the likes of Apple.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By Nortel on 12/3/2012 4:30:54 PM , Rating: 3
Advertising, shipping, taxes, physical stores, cloud/appstore/web servers, R&D, employees, etc...

Japan, Korea, USA all make quality components. What does China make exactly? All of the assembly machines in china to mill aluminum, robotic arms, glass polishing, automated QA are all made in countries like Germany (Herzog) or the US (Denso). Apple does all the grunt work by importing all these machines, setting up the assembly lines and training Foxconn on how to train their workers. China supplies the grunt labor to follow the carefully laid plans, that's all they are good for.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By retrospooty on 12/3/12, Rating: 0
By messele on 12/4/2012 2:09:36 AM , Rating: 3
Yeah, but then it doesn't say either "made in China" or "made in the USA" on it.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By Just Tom on 12/4/2012 10:30:12 AM , Rating: 1
It says Assembled in USA. Which is legally different than Made in USA.


By retrospooty on 12/4/2012 4:14:54 PM , Rating: 2
lovely...


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By boobo on 12/3/2012 9:07:58 PM , Rating: 2
Aren't Intel CPUs also made in Israel, Ireland, and Costa Rica?


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By Jeffk464 on 12/4/2012 12:38:40 AM , Rating: 2
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_manufa...

If you look at the factory and fab process it looks like Haswell will be manufactured only in Arizona and Oregon.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By The Jedi on 12/4/2012 2:13:58 PM , Rating: 2
That's cool, I did not know that. From the Intel PDF linked at that site:
quote:
Wafer fabrication or manufacturing of Intel’s microprocessors and chip sets is conducted in the U.S. (Arizona, New Mexico, Oregon and Massachusetts). China, Ireland and Israel. Following manufacturing the majority of our components are then assembled and tested at facilities in Malaysia, China, Costa Rica and Vietnam.

I thought they were completely made in like Malaysia. Apparently they are like the newest Samsung chips for Apple: made in the USA and shipped to an overseas factory for the final assembly into the chip package.

I was already well aware that the AMD chips are made in Dresden, Germany and sent to Asia (forget where Malaysia?) for assembly. AMD has that fab going on in New York state, I guess that will supplement Germany.


By radializer on 12/5/2012 10:17:16 PM , Rating: 2
The actual fabrication process cannot be done in a country that does not have the correct export controls in place. Hence most of the current generation and n-1 generation stuff cannot run in China as the US Customs export regulations forbid it, and F68 in Dalian manufactures 65nm (non High-K flow). Israel and Ireland however have a different relationship with the US compared to China and are permitted to manufacture 45nm, 32nm and 22nm technologies.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By name99 on 12/3/2012 4:32:25 PM , Rating: 2
OR these terms indicate that the concept "made in" is meaningless.

Do you demand that the aluminum for the cases come from the US? That the oil used to transport them come from the US? That the machine tools used to assemble them come from the US? etc etc etc

What these many terms show is that "made in" is a concept that can be de-aggregated in a hundred different ways. Don't use a term that is meaningless. Figure out what it is you are trying to achieve with the term and then use an appropriate term.
Are you trying to highlight where MACs are DESIGNED?
Are you trying to highlight where the CHIPs that Macs use are DESIGNED?
Are you trying to highlight where the RAW MATERIALs that Macs use are mined?
Are you trying to highlight where the various pieces are PUT TOGETHER? (but why assume that this assembly only occurs once, in one location?)
etc etc etc


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By retrospooty on 12/3/2012 5:37:42 PM , Rating: 1
I believe people are trying to "highlight" the fact that Apple is being deceptive. The label says made the the USA and that is false. Not like it matters, what computers are? None that I am aware of, but the fact that Apple feels the need to lie raises eyebrows on the company that is well known for it's lying, cheating and stealing.


RE: Gotta love the way with words...
By Fritzr on 12/4/2012 1:49:23 AM , Rating: 4
The label says "Assembled in USA". Under FTC rules it does not matter where the parts are manufactured as long as the final "substantial transformation" occurs in USA. Assembly of a product from a parts inventory qualifies as "Assembled in USA". It is not deceptive, but the buyer may not be aware of the FTC rules on labeling.
http://business.ftc.gov/documents/bus03-complying-...


By Just Tom on 12/4/2012 10:32:24 AM , Rating: 1
The consumer may not. But the pedestrian definition of assembled should make it clear that the parts might not have been made in the USA.


By alcalde on 12/8/2012 1:17:54 AM , Rating: 2
Not just us. China named a town "Usa" so companies could put "Made in Usa" on labels.

When I worked for a freight brokerage I learned that Wal-mart was buying its bleach from a company called KIK in Canada. Canadian truckers would drive it across the border into a warehouse owned by a dummy corporation. The Canadian trucks would be unloaded, the pallets would be reloaded onto American trucks, paperwork would be signed and - voila!- it was now American bleach as it left and rolled towards Wal-Mart's warehouses, and it was marketed as American bleach in their stores.


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