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Microsoft wants 20,000 extra green cards per year too

Microsoft is willing to pay the U.S. government for additional H-1B worker visas, saying there aren't enough skilled Americans to fill its available job openings.
 
More specifically, it suggested that the government raise $500 million a year by tacking on an extra $10,000 fee for each newly created H-1B visa or $15,000 for each new green card. This money can then be used to offer better education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) for Americans. Microsoft noted that not enough Americans are skilled in these areas to keep up with demand.

In addition to raising the number of visas offered, Microsoft wants the government to give 20,000 extra green cards per year.

H-1B visas allow foreign workers to come to the U.S. temporarily to work in their field. They can renew their visas every three years. Green cards, on the other hand, allow foreign workers to live in the country permanently. Currently, the government offers 65,000 visas a year, but in the past has seen numbers as high as 195,000.

Microsoft is one of the largest sponsors when it comes to H-1B visas. Ten percent of its 57,400 U.S. workforce are H-1B visa holders. From 2010 to 2011, it applied for about 850 visas annually for new employees on their very first H-1B visa. In 2011, Microsoft sponsored over 4,700 H-1B workers for green cards.

Many worry, however, that Microsoft is just looking for cheap labor. An issue is that Microsoft and other corporations don't need to prove that there aren't skilled Americans to fill these jobs. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) even warned that there are "inadequate safeguards" that protect skilled Americans from being booted out of jobs for cheaper foreign workers.

"The biggest myth people have is that a company like Microsoft somehow looks to foreign workers as an easy supply to displace American workers," said Karen Jones, Microsoft's deputy general counsel for human resources. "We simply cannot find qualified Americans to fill these jobs."

An analysis of Microsoft's green card applications shows that 25 percent were entry-level workers and 61 percent were a step up as software engineers or marketing managers. Most hold technical jobs, but most also make fewer than six figures while many graduates usually demand over $100,000 annual salaries.

Source: The Seattle Times



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RE: Seems legit..
By deksman2 on 11/27/2012 7:28:11 AM , Rating: 2
The problem indeed lies in the education system, but that's not the only issue.
We live in a world where most of the science/engineering type jobs are looked at as something 'hard'.

People's interests and desires are shaped by the culture/environment they live in.

On top of that, the educational system itself is idiotic.
Its based on repetition, competition and classes are NOT engaging to students in any capacity.
It doesn't expose children and grown-ups alike to relevant general education.
It doesn't encourage problem solving or critical thinking.

Education is industrialized, meaning that they are testing how good you are at following orders and then specifically train you to do a job and 'be productive for the purpose of economy and keeping the flow of money'.

It is accurate to say that you cannot force kids to become engineers, scientists and mathematicians...
BUT, we don't live in an environment/society that makes such classes interesting in the first place, or desirable.

People learn best when they have an active interest in something, but even that won't do you any good if you create an environment that SUCKS out all the joy out of doing it and forces you to look at it as a job.

First off, monetary incentive and competition fail miserably to entice creativity and problem solving (this much is evident from science alone).

We live in a day and age where we had for decades the ability to automate 75% of the global workforce.

We long surpassed the level of technology (over 100 years ago) where the mentality that 'you need to work in order to live or do anything else' applies.
We have had (and still do) ample supply of resources on landfills that could have been converted into SUPERIOR synthetic materials in such an abundance to provide the necessary needs and numerous wants, several times over for each person on the planet and industry at large (since the late 19th century no less).

Relevant general education.
Its practically non-existent. Because if people were exposed to this at a very young age, they would have general information at their fingertips in practically all subjects relating to man, and they would be able to govern themselves (no need for governments, politicians or people in positions of power) and they would be much less prone to being manipulated and used by others.

There is a method called 'gamification of life' which essentially entails learning through game like capacity.
Khan Academy is actually very similar to this.
No grades, no competition, etc.

There are plenty of taboos surrounding what children should be exposed to at a certain age for fear of them being damaged by it.
Its a load of bull.
Children are like adults.
In order to know something, they need to learn about it, or experience it.
Children are also better at learning new things because their brains are at a formative stage where information is absorbed better.
In adults, similar results occur when high levels of interests into something comes into play.

We can have a global population of renaissance men and women.
There are no intricately 'stupid people.
The difference is merely in the amount of information they were exposed to, and how well they assimilated that information (and I need not tell you that each person learns in their own way).


"It's okay. The scenarios aren't that clear. But it's good looking. [Steve Jobs] does good design, and [the iPad] is absolutely a good example of that." -- Bill Gates on the Apple iPad














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