backtop


Print 119 comment(s) - last by rocketbuddha.. on Nov 28 at 6:15 PM

Microsoft wants 20,000 extra green cards per year too

Microsoft is willing to pay the U.S. government for additional H-1B worker visas, saying there aren't enough skilled Americans to fill its available job openings.
 
More specifically, it suggested that the government raise $500 million a year by tacking on an extra $10,000 fee for each newly created H-1B visa or $15,000 for each new green card. This money can then be used to offer better education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) for Americans. Microsoft noted that not enough Americans are skilled in these areas to keep up with demand.

In addition to raising the number of visas offered, Microsoft wants the government to give 20,000 extra green cards per year.

H-1B visas allow foreign workers to come to the U.S. temporarily to work in their field. They can renew their visas every three years. Green cards, on the other hand, allow foreign workers to live in the country permanently. Currently, the government offers 65,000 visas a year, but in the past has seen numbers as high as 195,000.

Microsoft is one of the largest sponsors when it comes to H-1B visas. Ten percent of its 57,400 U.S. workforce are H-1B visa holders. From 2010 to 2011, it applied for about 850 visas annually for new employees on their very first H-1B visa. In 2011, Microsoft sponsored over 4,700 H-1B workers for green cards.

Many worry, however, that Microsoft is just looking for cheap labor. An issue is that Microsoft and other corporations don't need to prove that there aren't skilled Americans to fill these jobs. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) even warned that there are "inadequate safeguards" that protect skilled Americans from being booted out of jobs for cheaper foreign workers.

"The biggest myth people have is that a company like Microsoft somehow looks to foreign workers as an easy supply to displace American workers," said Karen Jones, Microsoft's deputy general counsel for human resources. "We simply cannot find qualified Americans to fill these jobs."

An analysis of Microsoft's green card applications shows that 25 percent were entry-level workers and 61 percent were a step up as software engineers or marketing managers. Most hold technical jobs, but most also make fewer than six figures while many graduates usually demand over $100,000 annual salaries.

Source: The Seattle Times



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

A start
By john80224 on 11/26/2012 5:13:41 PM , Rating: 2


Corrections:
"They can renew their visas every three years" The H-1b visa is three years and can be renewed once, then annually if already applied for a green card.

"Currently, the government offers 65,000 visas a year" There are 85,000 visas per year for corporations--20,000 reserved for graduate degrees--and unlimited for education and government (and some other non-profits, I think).

That out of the way, the basic principle has some merit. Directing the funds toward education is good. A recent study ranked the US education at 31st now. After nearly a quarter century of bringing over a significant chunk of supposedly "best and brightests" as we're so often told, it hasn't seemed to improve. Gee, maybe it is time to focus on building our own skills rather than just importing others'.

The fee itself needs to be at least annual, though. $10K for three years winds up as less than 2% of the total cost of the employee. I'm guessing the range of pay for any one of these positions is broader than $3300. As it stands, though, it's hardly a deterrent to overlooking locals, especially those not fresh out of college.

The last paragraph doesn't speak well of Microsoft's case. Sounds a bit like trying to fill with cheaper, inexperienced labor. It's conspicuous that the 1/4 of GC applications--presumably for employeess who have at least a couple years with MS--are still rated at entry level meaning essentially no prior experience at time of introduction and most of the rest aren't much higher.




"This is about the Internet.  Everything on the Internet is encrypted. This is not a BlackBerry-only issue. If they can't deal with the Internet, they should shut it off." -- RIM co-CEO Michael Lazaridis














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki