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Senator Patrick Leahy (D, Vt.), seen here in a cameo in The Dark Knight, was "pressured" by National District Attorneys' Association and the National Sheriffs' Association to change the language of the privacy bill  (Source: Warner Bros.)
Bill originally added protection for e-mail

Talk about a bait and switch. CNET is reporting that Senator Patrick Leahy (D, Vt.), who is the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, has revised legislation he proposed previously that originally claimed to protect e-mail privacy of American citizens. That proposal has been rewritten, and now allows for law enforcement officials to read your e-mails without a warrant.

The bill is scheduled for a vote next week and was reworked after the National District Attorneys' Association and the National Sheriffs' Association made it clear that they were concerned about increasing difficulty gaining access to e-mails for criminal investigations. The rewritten bill would give access to e-mail, Google Docs files, Facebook wall posts, and Twitter messages to 22 different government agencies without the need for a search warrant.
 
The rewritten bill would also allow the FBI and Homeland Security additional authority in certain circumstances to access accounts on the internet without notifying the owner or needing approval by a judge.

The original legislation proposed would've required police to obtain a search warrant and have probable cause before they were allowed to read the contents of e-mail or other digital communications.
 
Senator Leahy previously said of his legislation, "[The bill] provides enhanced privacy protections for American consumers by... requiring that the government obtain a search warrant."

Source: CNET



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RE: No
By cubby1223 on 11/20/2012 11:18:07 AM , Rating: 4
And I fully intend to expect my congressman to ignore my concerns...

It's the problem in this country, we tend to elect politicians based not so much on their own stances, rather on how much we personally hate "the other side".

As long as the parties continue to allow the incumbent to run unopposed in the primaries, we will continue to have no choice.


RE: No
By ArcsinZ on 11/20/2012 1:11:19 PM , Rating: 2
Actually congressman are usually very responsive when people write in to inform them how to vote. Sometimes one person may not sway their opinion, but when many people make a point to tell their representative how they feel it is usually effective.

They want to get re-elected. They do that by being good representatives. It's not the same as a national election where you can write off half of the voters. Most local representation understands that the majority of their constituents will vote based on qualifications and less on party.


RE: No
By FITCamaro on 11/20/2012 4:38:47 PM , Rating: 2
Congressman yes. Senators no.


RE: No
By Rukkian on 11/20/2012 4:56:42 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
Actually congressman are usually very responsive when people send money in to inform them how to vote.

Sometimes one dollar may not sway their opinion, but when many dollars make a point to tell their representative how they feel it is usually effective.


There fixed it for ya!


RE: No
By NellyFromMA on 11/20/2012 1:38:13 PM , Rating: 2
The problem isn't as you describe (at least, not entirely). Rather, the problem is constituents tend to think the wa y you describe and choose to accept having 'no voice' and not voice concerns.

If people stopped that and actually made attempts to express dismay at these various things in semi-unison, they would be compelled to re-consider.

The problem is, people by far and large just dont care enoguh to do anything more than sigh and gasp


RE: No
By heffeque on 11/20/2012 5:41:23 PM , Rating: 3
That's the problem with USA's two party system. You can't really choose because it's poo party versus sh¡t party.


"When an individual makes a copy of a song for himself, I suppose we can say he stole a song." -- Sony BMG attorney Jennifer Pariser














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