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Print 68 comment(s) - last by hifloor.. on Nov 22 at 3:50 AM

Stupid is as stupid does...

A large number of deaths are attributed each year to distracted driving in the United States. Many drivers are too busy texting, making phone calls, or reading (among other things) while driving their cars. If you listen to some people in Washington, the answer to fixing such driving stupidity are even more safety mandates.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) wants collision-avoidance technology such as forward-collision and lane-departure warning systems, adaptive cruise control, and automatic braking on every car sold in the U.S. These technologies are already available as options on many luxury cars currently on the market.

The problem on the consumer end of things is that these safety features are included in options packages that add $1,000 or more to the price of the vehicle. Automotive manufacturers oppose the NTSB because the added costs would spread to even the most basic automobiles on the market instead of being relegated to more expensive vehicles where buyers are more willing to fork over the money.
 
However, the NTSB believes that this sort of technology can help drivers improve reaction times and avoid crashes.

According to the NHTSA, systems such as the ones it's recommending would make a significant impact on reducing the number of accidents caused by distracted drivers. Accidents caused by distracted drivers account for 60% of highway fatalities.

"We have a chance to take a big bite into that figure," NTSB board member Robert Sumwalt said.

Source: Detroit News



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Making drivers dumber?
By Schrag4 on 11/16/2012 8:34:55 AM , Rating: 2
Am I the only one that thinks a barrage of warnings about potential collisions, lane departure, and the like might condition new drivers to rely on those warnings? That they might actually be much, much worse at detecting these problems on their own without the warnings once they get used to them?

I don't see this as a good thing. I think it will make drivers more dependent on some system that can fail rather than encouraging drivers to sharpen their driving skills. That and people will be sue-happy when these systems fail (or if they ignore the warnings, crash, then claim they failed) - in other words these systems work against personal resopnsibility on multiple fronts.




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